Meeting Time Changes

After the poll, several rounds of conversations in meetings, and individual comments and conversations, it seems like a good idea to try adding an alternating meeting time.

Let’s go ahead and adjust the existing meeting time due to the DST changes as usual, to 1700 UTC on Wednesday. This will be the next meeting.

After that, let’s try alternating to Mondays at 1400 UTC every other week for a month and reconnect here on the hosting Make site to see how it things went. Then, we can decide if we want to give it some more time, or things need to change.

I’m excited to make the meeting accessible to double the folks (per the poll) than it was before, and am looking forward to chatting with you all!

Having the second meeting time means that those of us who were leading meetings or making notes before might be split between the meetings. If you’re interested in leading either meeting, or helping write or proof notes, please leave a comment on this post!

For clarity’s sake, here are the next few meeting times:

See you there!

#hosting-community

Hosting Meeting Notes: March 27, 2019

Here’s the summary of our meeting in #hosting-community on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 at 1800 UTC (Slack archive).

Attendees: @jadonn @brechtryckaert @brettface @kamala @dhsean @earnjam @desrosj @andrewtaylor-1 @redituk @RonG @xkon

New Meeting Time – Continued Discussion

Thank you for participating in last week’s poll!

Per @mikeschroder the poll results highlighted two main times when two different sets of 10 people can attend a meeting.

The proposed new times are: Wednesdays at 1800 UTC and Monday at 1400 UTC.

Meeting notes will be used for more asynchronous communication.

Options proposed by folks attending the chat were:
1) Alternate two meeting times/dates.
2) Change the meeting time to 1600 or 1700 UTC.
3) Hold two separate weekly meetings at two separate times.
4) Keep the current meeting time.

WordPress 5.2 Beta Release Rescheduled for March 27th

WordPress 5.2 Highlights

WordPress 5.2 supports PHP 5.6.20+

Introducing the new Site Health module!

Hosts – Please test it out and provide any feedback in the ticket here:

https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/46573

Hosts may be interested in the ability to extend the health tool by adding tests to the Status page, or additional information to the Debug tab.

@earnjam is working on coordinating dev notes for WordPress 5.2 with more info on the Health Check tool.

Feedback

Miss this week’s meeting and want to know more about anything above? Spend some time in the comments and share your thoughts! OR….Come join us!

Next Meeting

The next meeting will be in #hosting-community on Wednesday, April 10th, 2019 at 1800 UTC. Hope to see you then!

+make.wordpress.org/updates

#hosting-community

Proposal For New Introduction To Hosting Community Team Meetings

The #hosting-community team will soon start regular Slack-based meetings with an introduction stating the team’s overall purpose. The aim is to inform new meeting attendees of what the team is about, who the team’s participants are, state what to expect during the meeting, and to specifically welcome new team members.

The team had consensus in Slack on the following introduction statement:

If you’re new here, welcome! Feel free to introduce yourself if you like!

This is the weekly meeting for the Hosting community team, and we work together to help make user experience with WordPress better at hosts. Many folks on the team are from hosts, but there are also some learning to host WordPress themselves, or that work in the community with hosts, like plugin and theme authors, or folks that work in support.

This meeting is usually used to connect about WordPress happenings throughout the week connected with hosting and to catch up on the status of the team’s ongoing projects. Usually we’ll step through a few scheduled items, then open up the floor at the end for any additional topics to be discussed. Notes are taken during the chat for posting on [https://make.wordpress.org/hosting/].

The #hosting-community team would like to welcome anyone with feedback about this introduction or having an introduction to post a comment on this blog post. If there are no further changes or adjustments to be made at this time, the #hosting-community team will adopt the introduction statement. The introduction can be changed in the future, but it will be adopted by the next team Slack meeting in #hosting-community on Wednesday, February 6th, 2019 at 1800 UTC. Hope to see you then!

Finally, thank you @mikeschroder for writing the introduction statement above and @francina for suggesting the team develops an introduction statement!

Video Chats and Herding Cats

Hi!

One idea to come out of last month’s WordCamp US was the understanding that the Hosting group could be so much more active, if only we could boost our participation numbers.

The Hosting group is full of smart, well-connected people that either work at web hosts, or work closely with them in various capacities. And, despite nearly 600 members in the #hosting-community Slack channel, check-ins at our weekly meetings (Wednesdays at 1800 UTC) rarely top more than a half dozen active participants.

WordCamp Energy!

As anyone who has attended a WordCamp can tell you, the value of face-to-face interactions is immeasurable. Many people will become much more engaged in a topic when discussing it in real-time, in the real world. Of course, the reverse is true as well – many people feel more comfortable communicating online. That’s fine, too!

One of the things the Hosting group discussed at WordCamp US’ Contributor Day was a desire to capture that high enthusiasm level that exists at WordCamp events and…bottle it! We wanted to bring it online in a way that Slack, for whatever reason, isn’t always able to fully replicate.

What’s next?

The idea we came up with wasn’t particularly revolutionary: video chats.

We would like to experiment with augmenting our regular, standing Slack meetings with group video chats. Our Slack meetings will never go away. Our video chats might. 🙂 This is really just a test to see if we can boost engagement among our group members.

The goal is purely to give this group another outlet for communication in a method that may be more comfortable for some participants to engage in, at a time that’s a bit separated from the Slack meetings.

We’re still working out the technical aspects of it all, but either recordings, transcripts, or meeting notes would be made available shortly after the video meetings. @francina has kindly offered up the use of a Zoom account for us to use while we give this a shot.

Let’s Do It!

I’d like to propose a meeting time of 2100 UTC on Tuesdays with our first trial call on February 5, 2019 2100 UTC.

We will share links to the meeting in #hosting-community as we get closer to the date.

With all that said, we’d really love to see you there! This could be great! Or super lame! I guess we’ll find out!

On chats, video chats, recaps and decisions

During the last chat we discussed a number of possible changes to the group chats.
Here is my experience from the Community Chats over the past few years

Chats

Sometimes not a lot of people show up, but consistency is key.

Another tip: we shouldn’t assume everyone is familiar with what we do in any team so we start by making a short intro.
This is what we post, it fits what we do and how we do it.

Hello hello

We’re starting our bi-monthly Community Team chat now – react to this message with your flags so we can see where you’re all from!

For anyone who is joining for the first time (whether active or observing), this is a meeting where community deputies discuss issues that have come up, WordCamps/meetups they are working on, and generally keeping up to date on what is going on in this corner of the WordPress project.

Most contributors on this team are volunteers, but we do have a handful of people who are sponsored to do this work. Ask questions as you have them, but remember we are family-friendly around here.

We might discuss issues when meeting in person, but we make decisions on the community blog :slightly_smiling_face:

Video Chats

It was discussed to add a video call to the regular weekly chat.
The main doubt seems to be how to make the content of those chats available for posterity: Zoom has the option to record video calls and they can be posted on YouTube or WordPress.tv.
I will check if the Community Team has a paid account and will report back.

Chat recaps

Team reps should post chat recaps in the Updates blog.
For the Community Team I post them there (Admittedly quite late) and then post the link to the Updates post in the agenda post in the team blog. See example.
Another solution is cross posting.
Whatever we pick, it would be great to see the hosting-community chat recaps show up in Updates 🙂

Discussions and decisions

The Community Team is operating in full transparency, which means that we discuss in our blog all the issues that come to mind.

We are refining the procedure, also by trying to use titles that make it clear from the start what you are about to read. If it’s a proposal the title will be “Proposal: …”, if it’s an announcement “Announcement:…”, if we need to put a team together for a specific purpose or need help with a task “Volunteers needed:…”, you get the gist.

If action is needed, we set a deadline at the end of the post and mark it as “To Do” through the native O2 functionality. See example.

Finally, when you want to wrap things up – even to say “We couldn’t come to a conclusion but we exhausted the conversation – you can use the “Top Comment” function.
When you click to edit a comment you will see “Edit, Delete, Top Comment”.
This last item will

  • Color the background of the comment in green
  • Show it as a sticky comment on top of the others

This is a great visual way to see where you’re at, when scrolling through the blog. You can also mark the post as “Done” if you want to make super-mega sure that everyone sees it 🙂 See example.
If you don’t see this in the blog, you need to ask Meta to activate it.

Bring your Ideas and Projects to the October 24th Hosting Community Meeting

The #hosting-community team is looking for new opportunities to enhance the WordPress experience for WordPress users! Hosts and others in the WordPress community are welcome to join the team at the October 24th meeting Wednesday, October 24th, 2018 at 1700 UTC. The team would also like to ask regular contributors and team members to outline 2-3 ideas for new initiatives for the team to work on.

The #hosting-community wants to hear all ideas, big or small, especially for projects related to or for improving WordPress hosting. Some of the team’s previous projects include:

New ideas and initiatives do not have to be limited to these kinds of projects. Contributors and newcomers alike are welcome to suggest any new initiatives or efforts that could improve the hosting experience for WordPress users in general.

Send Your Delegates to the July 11th Hosting Community Meeting

The WordPress.org Hosting Community (#hosting-community) wants to help prepare hosting support teams for the launch of Gutenberg by producing documentation and resources hosting companies can use to prepare their support teams to best assist their users with Gutenberg before Gutenberg launches.

Anyone interested in preparing for the launch of Try Gutenberg and the launch of Gutenberg in general is welcome to attend the meeting of the Hosting Community team at Wednesday, July 11th, 2018 at 1700 UTC. This will be an opportunity for everyone to meet, establish key milestones, and figure out how to collaborate. Feel free to join #hosting-community in the WordPress.org Slack before then if you have any questions, etc.

At a high level, our goals are to help hosting support teams:

  1. Understand what Gutenberg is and how it works.
  2. Be confident in diagnosing support requests / bug reports / plugin conflicts.
  3. Know how to act on the result of their diagnosis (let it be opening a new Gutenberg issue, reporting the conflict to the plugin author, etc.).

Gutenberg is the redesigned WordPress editor launching later this year with WordPress 5.0. It marks a relatively significant change to WordPress’s editor interface, and the WordPress.org Hosting Community team wants to support a smooth transition to Gutenberg for hosting companies’ customers.

WordPress users will also soon receive an invitation in their WordPress admin dashboard to Try Gutenberg. Users who opt in to Try Gutenberg will have the Gutenberg plugin installed to their WordPress websites. We expect that WordPress users will go to their hosting providers’ support teams first for help with Gutenberg.

We are developing documentation that outlines the best practices for assisting customers with Gutenberg and where support teams can find additional help. The documentation currently lives in a shared Google Document. It contains information about Gutenberg, including:

  1. What is Gutenberg
  2. How to try Gutenberg before it launches
  3. Common support questions
  4. Common bugs
  5. How to file a bug template
  6. Suggested steps for troubleshooting Gutenberg-related issues
  7. Guidance on looking for plugin conflicts with Gutenberg

We want to work directly with hosting companies to cultivate Gutenberg Subject Matter Experts who can take the lead in coordinating with their hosting team and the WordPress.org Hosting Community team to prepare for Gutenberg. Hosting companies interested in collaborating on plans for preparing their teams for Gutenberg should send a representative to the Wednesday, July 11th, 2018 at 1700 UTC. We will discuss the launch of Try Gutenberg and Gutenberg in more detail at that meeting.

We aim to partner with hosting companies to capture user feedback about Gutenberg in order to help drive improvements in Gutenberg. Hosting companies are well-positioned to best assists WordPress users with the move to Gutenberg and to communicate to the Gutenberg team the problems their users are experiencing with Gutenberg. Hosting support teams can contribute to Gutenberg directly through submitting bug reports and providing feedback to the Gutenberg team and the Hosting Community team on how Gutenberg can be made better for WordPress users.

We look forward to seeing you on July 11th!

Hosting Meeting Notes: May 9nd, 2018

Here’s the summary of our meeting #hosting-community on Wednesday, May 9nd, 2018 at 1700 UTC (Slack archive).

Attendees:
@mikeschroder @andrewtaylor-1 @jadonn @dhsean @pdclark @danielbachhuber

Hosting Best Practices Documentation

Gutenberg

Feedback

Miss this week’s meeting and want to discuss the initiatives above? Spend some time in the comments and share your thoughts!

Next Meeting

The next meeting will be in #hosting-community on Wednesday, May 16th, 2018, 1700 UTC. Hope to see you then!

Hosting Meeting Notes: April 25th, 2018

Here’s the summary of our meeting #hosting-community on Wednesday, April 25th, 2018 at 1700 UTC (Slack archive).

Attendees:
@mikeschroder @danielbachhuber @andrewtaylor-1 @jadonn @aaroncampbell @josh2k5 @antpb @brettface @desrosj

Team Organization

  • WordPress.org contributor and team badges were given out.
    • Contributor badges are for concrete contributions, such as making a contribution to one of the team’s active projects.
    • Team badges are for team members who show a combination of contributions, participation, and helping with planning and execution of team projects.
    • If you did not receive a badge, and you feel like you should have, please message @mikeschroder on Slack.
  • The Contributor Drive documentation was passed back to community team for inclusion in future contributor drives.
    • Thank you everyone who added to this documentation!

Hosting Best Practices Documentation

Gutenberg

  • @danielbachhuber had three updates
    • Plugin compatibility test results:
      • Plugin compatibility database, announced March 1st, 2018, has had 70 testers who have tested 861 out of 5000 total plugins.
      • Of 861 tested plugins:
        • 219 (25.44%) are compatible.
        • 518 (60.16%) are likely compatible.
        • 25 (2.9%) are likely not compatible.
        • 39 (4.53%) are not compatible.
        • 60 (6.97%) are in “testing” (i.e. someone started a test and did not complete the test)
    • @danielbachhuber would like to focus on acquiring more data, with Try Gutenberg being a big opportunity.
    • @danielbachhuber proposed having the plugin compatibility database be moved into WordPress.org, which would be a large amount of work, but worthwhile if it brings in a lot of useful data.
  • Try Gutenberg is currently scheduled to launch in WordPress 4.9.6, which is scheduled for release on May 15th scheduled to launch in WordPress 4.9.7 as of May 2nd, 2018 (thanks to @aaronrutley for pointing out this was changed).
    • @danielbachhuber asked if team members’ support teams were ready to address Gutenberg support requests
      • @jadonn and @josh2k5 responded they would have to check with their support team for readiness.
      • @jadonn and @josh2k5 asked for official documentation that could be provided to support teams to help prepare support teams
        • @danielbachhuber recommended drawing up an outline of information that their supports teams would like like to have

Feedback

Miss this week’s meeting and want to discuss the initiatives above? Spend some time in the comments and share your thoughts!

Next Meeting

The next meeting will be in #hosting-community on Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018, 1700 UTC. Hope to see you then!

Hosting Meeting Notes: March 28, 2018

Here’s a summary of our meeting in #hosting-community on Wednesday, March 28, 2018, 1:00 PM CST

(Slack archive).

Contribution Documentation

  • @mikeschroder mentioned that Angela Jin is helping document contributor groups and drives, including info on how to contribute and projects available for contribution. An open call was made for Hosting Community contributors to help write up and proof documentation. @antpb and @ataylorme expressed interest in helping proof and write up info. If anyone else would like to help on this front, please ping @mikeschroder on slack.
  • Two initiatives need attention — @danielbachhuber’s Gutenberg testing, and Hosting Best Practice docs, which @ataylorme has been leading. They’re both in need of significant help.
  • In the last meeting folks mentioned that it might be a good idea to pick a day or days to work together on docs, because pre-scheduled time might help. It was determined that Friday 4/6 at 1700 UTC we will meet to discuss documentation. Please come join us! When the event starts, instructions will be posted in the channel for optionally joining a hangout while working.

Hosting Community Discussion

  • @mikeschroder expressed a need to bring in more representatives for the Hosting Community group. There is open call for nominations (self or otherwise) to help the group with things like organizing meetings, notes, or getting things together for camps and contributor days.

Gutenberg Testing

  • @jadonn mentioned the need for Gutenberg Testing outreach and @miker has joined the group to help in those efforts (Welcome!). A resource was shared by @pdclark on Gutenberg testing: https://github.com/danielbachhuber/gutenberg-plugin-compatibility/issues/4
  • The signup process in the testing site was mentioned to be a bit of a hassle/blocker in contributions to testing. Some discussion was had around sharing authentication via WordPress.org users. @danielbachhuber mentioned that considering things like automation the level of effort to link the two may be overkill. 
  • @danielbachhuber mentioned that we don't take ownership of updating the plugins ourselves, but instead focus on making the compatibility data available/accurate, and then assist the plugin author with guidance on how to make their plugin Gutenberg compatible. Our main focus is just getting data around what is/isn't compatible. 
  • On the topic of automation @danielbachuber warned "The challenge with the existing implementation is that some plugins require configuration before they expose editor UI. Simply taking screenshots of a fresh WordPress install with the plugin activated in some automated manner isn't sufficient. However, if a hosting company were open to it, we could grab customer databases with the plugins already activated, spin them up in some isolated environment, and do our screenshot analysis."
  • @danielbachuber also mentioned "We could potentially generate a ton of plugin incompatibility data by screening the WordPress.org support forums"
  • @danielbachuber also shared a comment that outlines some great steps for testing compatibility: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/4072#issuecomment-356136576

Feedback

Miss this week’s meeting and want to know more about anything above? Spend some time in the comments and share your thoughts! OR….Come join us!

Have some questions on how you can get involved? Join #hosting-community and feel free to ask at any time.

Next Meeting

The next meeting will be in #hosting-community on Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 1:00 PM CST. Hope to see you then!

#hosting-community#weekly-hosting-chat