I Edit

i18n, internationalization i18n, internationalization

Abbreviation for internationalization.

It’s OK to abbreviate internationalization as i18n. Spell out on the first mention.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information about writing for a global audience, see What is internationalization, localization, and translation?.

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icon icon

Use only to describe a graphic that represents another item or object such as a folder, document, or app.

Use bold formatting for the icon name. For more information, see UI elements and interaction.

Don’t use icon to describe options that appear on toolbars, menus, or other UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. elements in a window. For options that have graphics rather than text labels, use the most descriptive term available, such as button, box, or checkbox.

If a graphic is enclosed in a rectangular border, then refer to it as a button. If it is not enclosed in a rectangular border, and doesn’t initiate an action when clicked, then refer to it as an icon.

If an icon doesn’t have any label or name, and you have to use a descriptor, use a contextually relevant term. Describe the icon’s appearance or function and include an inline graphic of the icon. Don’t enclose the icon in parentheses. Use lowercase. It’s OK to use the word icon in discussions about the icon itself.

See also button, symbol.

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ID ID

Initialism for identification or identifier. Use uppercase.

It’s OK to use lowercase in developer documentation, such as protocols or commands.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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IDE IDE

Initialism for Integrated Development Environment. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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i.e. i.e.

Don’t use. Instead, use that is.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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if, whether if, whether

Use if to indicate a condition. Use whether to indicate when two outcomes are possible.

If you can affix the words or not in a clause, use whether rather than if.

Examples

Warning: Not recommended: The is_plugin_active() function determines if a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is active.


Tip: Recommended: The is_plugin_active() function determines whether a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is active (or not).

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illegal illegal

Don’t use to mean not valid or invalid.

See also invalid.

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image image

See photo.

For more information, see Images, illustrations, and graphics.

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imbed imbed

Don’t use. Instead, use embed.

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img file img file

Don’t use a filename extension to refer to a type of file. For example, use disc image file or bitmap image file rather than .img file.

For more information, see Referring to file types.

See also image.

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impact impact

Use only as a noun. As a verb, use affect or a contextually similar verb.

Examples

Warning: Not recommended: This technique impacts application startup.


Tip: Acceptable: This technique has an impact on application startup.


Tip: Recommended: This technique affects application startup.

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inactive inactive

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

See also dimmed, disable, disabled, shaded, unavailable.

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index, indexes, indices index, indexes, indices

Use indexes as the plural form of index. Use indices only in the context of mathematical expressions.

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info info

It’s OK to use info as a shortened term for information in an informal context.

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initialize initialize

Don’t use to mean start a program or application, or turn on a device.

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

See also start, restart, turn on, turn off.

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initiate initiate

Don’t use to mean start a program or application.

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inline inline

One word. Not in line or in-line.

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in order to in order to

Avoid using. Instead, use use to.

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input input

Don’t use as a verb. Instead, use a contextually appropriate verb such as enter, type.

In user documentation and for a general audience, don’t use as a noun to mean data or value entered.

For more information, see Interaction verbs.

See also enter, type.

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inside inside

Not inside of.

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install install

Use as a verb to describe the action of adding programs, apps, other software, and hardware to a device.

Don’t use install as a noun. Instead, use installation.

See also download, load, upload,

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instantiate instantiate

Don’t use. Instead, use an instance of (a class).

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interface interface

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

Don’t use as a verb. Instead, use interact or communicate.

See also UI.

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internet internet

Use to refer to the collection of networks such as the World Wide Web or a generic network.

Use lowercase. Capitalize only in proper names, such as Internet Protocol.

See also web.

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interrupt interrupt

OK to use as a noun in developer documentation and for a technical audience.

See also close, end, exit, stop.

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into, in to into, in to

Use in to when in is part of the verb. Use into to refer to a movement or action taking place inside something, or expressing a change of state.

Examples

Warning: Not recommended: Log into your computer.


Tip: Recommended: Log in to your computer.


Tip: Recommended: You can import content into your site from another WordPress site using the WordPress Import tool.


Tip: Recommended: Split the columns into one-thirds using the column blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience..

See also onto, on to.

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invalid invalid

OK to use. When possible, use more specific and accurate terms depending on the context.

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invoke invoke

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

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I/O I/O

Initialism for Input/Output. Use uppercase and note the punctuation.

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Always spell out on the first mention. It’s OK to abbreviate as I/O for subsequent instances.

Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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iOS iOS

Use uppercase for OS in iOS.

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iPad iPad

Capitalize P in iPad.

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iPhone iPhone

Capitalize P in iPhone.

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IP IP

Initialism for intellectual property or Internet Protocol. Use uppercase.

As an initialism for Internet Protocol, it’s OK to use lowercase in developer documentation, such as protocols or commands.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

See also IP address.

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IP address IP address

Initialism for Internet Protocol address. Note capitalization.

It’s OK to use lowercase in developer documentation, such as protocols or commands.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

See also IP.

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IRC IRC

Initialism for Internet Relay Chat. Note capitalization.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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ISAPI ISAPI

Initialism for Internet Server Application Programming Interface. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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issue issue

Don’t use as a verb. Avoid using as a synonym for problem.

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italic, italics italic, italics

Use italic for the adjective form and the plural italics as a noun form.

For more information, see Formatting common text elements.

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it’s, its it’s, its

Be wary of common mistakes such as confusing its with it’s.

The possessive of it is its and doesn’t have an apostrophe. Whereas it’s is a contraction for it is.

For more information, see Contractions and Possessives.

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