H Edit

half- half-

Use a hyphen in compound adjectives beginning with half-.

Examples

  • half-capacity
  • high-length
  • half-duplex

For more information, see Hyphens.

For word usage of specific terms, see The American Heritage Dictionary.

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hang hang

Don’t use to refer to a device, computer, or system that isn’t responding. Instead, use stop responding to describe a program or application which encounters a problem, isn’t responding, and cannot close itself.

Use close to describe the action a program takes to close itself when it has encountered a problem and can’t continue.

See also close, stop, stop responding.

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hardcode hardcode

OK to use in developer documentation and for a technical audience. Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience.

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hard disk hard disk

Use to refer to a magnetic disk.

Use storage device instead of disk or drive to refer generally to external drives such as hard drives, solid-state drives, flash storage, and other types of storage hardware.

See also hard drive, memory, storage.

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hard drive hard drive

Use to refer to the drive on a computer used for storage purposes.

Use storage device instead of disk or drive to refer generally to external drives such as hard drives, solid-state drives, flash storage, and other types of storage hardware.

See also hard disk, memory, storage.

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HD HD

Initialism for high definition (as a verb) and high-definition (as an adjective). Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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Don’t use as a synonym for heading.

Don’t use running head instead of header in the context of content publishing, word-processing, and websites.

It’s OK to use header as a shortened term for file header in developer documentation and for a technical audience.

Don’t use header as an abbreviated term for header file at the beginning of the file which refers to the data libraries, or definitions of variables and data types used by a program.

See also footer.

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heading heading

Use instead of head or header to refer to the heading of an article or a section.

For more information, see Headings and titles.

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healthy healthy

Don’t use to describe the condition of any device or application.

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he/she he/she

Don’t use.

For more information, see Pronouns and genders.

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help help

Don’t use as a noun to refer to user or support documentation, manuals, guides, or tutorials.

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high- high-

Use a hyphen in compound adjectives beginning with high-.

Examples

  • high-quality
  • high-bandwidth
  • high-resolution
  • high-intensity

For more information, see Hyphens.

For word usage of specific terms, see The American Heritage Dictionary.

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higher higher

Don’t use as a synonym for later to refer to subsequent versions of a product or software. Instead, use later.

See also earlier, later.

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highlight highlight

Don’t use to mean select.

For more information, see Interaction verbs.

See also select.

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high-quality high-quality

Don’t use quality by itself as an adjective. Instead, use high-quality. Hyphenate.

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high-resolution high-resolution

Hyphenate. Don’t abbreviate as hi-res or high-res.

See also resolution.

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hint hint

Don’t use as a heading or title for a type of note. Instead, use Note, Info, or Tip.

For more information, see Notices.

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hit hit

Don’t use to refer to pressing a key or to mean click or type. Instead, use select.

For more information, see Interaction verbs.

See also select.

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hold, hold the pointer over hold, hold the pointer over

When the environment is presumably a touch device, use hold and hold the pointer over in a desktop environment, when referring to the action of the user holding or hovering the pointer over a UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. element, but not clicking the element.

For more information, see Hold, hold the pointer over.

See also point to.

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home, homepage home, homepage

Use home to refer to the main page of a website that is displayed upon opening by default. Don’t use landing page.

It’s OK to use homepage instead of home for further clarity in some contexts.

Don’t use home or homepage to refer to an entire website.

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home directory home directory

Don’t use.

Instead, use root or root directory in developer documentation and for a technical audience.

See also root, root directory.

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hostname hostname

One word. Not host name or host-name.

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hot key hot key

Don’t use to describe a combination of keystrokes used to perform an action.

For more information, see Pressing and typing keyboard keys.

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Don’t use to refer to a link.

For more information, see the Linking section.

See also link.

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hover, hover over hover, hover over

Don’t use. Instead, use hold or hold the pointer over.

See also hold, hold the pointer over, point to.

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HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. HTML

Initialism for Hypertext Markup Language. Use uppercase.

Don’t use a filename extension to refer to a type of file. For example, use HTML file file rather than .html file.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information, see Referring to file types.

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HTTPHTTP HTTP is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol. HTTP is the underlying protocol used by the World Wide Web and this protocol defines how messages are formatted and transmitted, and what actions Web servers and browsers should take in response to various commands., HTTPSHTTPS HTTPS is an acronym for Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure. HTTPS is the secure version of HTTP, the protocol over which data is sent between your browser and the website that you are connected to. The 'S' at the end of HTTPS stands for 'Secure'. It means all communications between your browser and the website are encrypted. This is especially helpful for protecting sensitive data like banking information. HTTP, HTTPS

Initialism for Hypertext Transfer Protocol and Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure. Use uppercase.

It’s OK to use lowercase in developer documentation, such as protocols or commands.

In general, omit http:// and https:// from URLs. If you need to include http:// or *https://*, use lowercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information, see the Linking section.

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It’s OK to use hyperlink instead of link to describe text, graphic, button, or another element that users can select to go to another document, another place within the same document, or to a webpage.

For more information, see Interaction verbs and the Linking section.

See also link.

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