C Edit

cache, cached, caching

Use cache as a noun or verb. Use cached as a verb or adjective. Use caching without an e as a noun or verb.

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calendar

Don’t use as a verb. Instead, use schedule, list, or a contextually appropriate verb.

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call back, callback

Use two words as a verb. Use one word as an adjective or noun.

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call out, callout

Use two words as a verb. Use one word as an adjective or noun.

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can

Use can to convey permission, to refer to an optional action, or to refer to a possible outcome.

Examples

Tip: Recommended: You can also use the slash command to insert a blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience..


Tip: Recommended: The process can take up to 15 minutes.

See also may.

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cancel, canceled, canceling, cancellation

Use one l for the verb cancel and its other forms such as canceled and canceling.

Use two ls for cancellation.

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capability

Avoid using in the context of features or functionalities of software or hardware. Instead, rewrite the sentence without using the term.

Examples

Warning: Not recommended: GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ has the capability of blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editing.


Tip: Recommended: You can edit blocks with GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/.

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carry out

Don’t use as a synonym for run or execute.

See also run.

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catalog

Use instead of catalogue.

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cell phone, cellular phone

Don’t use. Instead, use mobile or mobile phone, or if you’re talking about more than phones, then use mobile device. It’s OK to just use phone by itself when the context is clear.

See also mobile, mobile device, mobile phone.

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cellular data

Don’t use. Instead, use mobile data.

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cellular network

Don’t use. Instead, use mobile network.

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CGI

Initialism for Common Gateway Interface. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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chapter

Don’t use when referring to documentation that isn’t in the form of a book. Instead, refer to documents, pages, or sections.

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character

Use in reference to what a key on a keyboard stands for.

See also symbol.

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chart

Don’t use as a verb when referring to entering data for a chart. Instead, use plot.

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chat

Use as a noun only after identifying the context such as audio chat or video chat to avoid ambiguity.

It’s OK to use chat as an adjective or verb.

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check

Don’t use as a verb to refer to marking a checkbox. Instead, use select.

See also checkbox, clear, select.

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checkbox

One word. Not check box or check-box.

In general, emphasize on the task to be accomplished, rather than how the user should interact with the UI element. If you have to use a descriptor, use checkbox.

For more information, see Checkbox.

See also check.

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checksum

One word. Not check sum or check-sum.

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child folder

Don’t use. Use subfolder, subdirectory, folder, or the name of the folder.

See also folder.

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chip

Don’t use to mean microprocessor.

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chmod

Contraction for change mode. Use lowercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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choose

Use choose when referring to the action of the user making a choice from multiple options, a list of items, or numerical values.

For more information, see Choose.

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clear

Use clear as a verb when referring to the action of clearing a selection, usually from a checkbox.

Use instead of unselect, deselect, or uncheck.

For more information, see Clear.

See also delete, remove.

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CLI

Initialism for command line interface. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information, see Command-line syntax.

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click

When the environment is presumably a desktop with a mouse, use click to describe the act of selecting most targets such as buttons, links, list items, and radio buttons or initiating an action by briefly pressing and releasing the mouse.

For more information, see Click.

See also double click, double-click, double tap, double-tap, press, press and hold, select, tap, double-tap.

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client

Don’t use to refer to a person. Instead, use customer.

See also client/server.

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client/server

Use a slash. Capitalize both words if the context requires client to be capitalized.

See also client.

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close

Use as a verb to describe closing applications, programs, files, documents, alerts, and other UI elements.

For more information, see Close.

See also open, end, exit, interrupt, stop.

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cloud

Don’t capitalize. In most cases, use cloud as an adjective. Avoid using as a noun, as in the cloud.

Don’t use cloud interchangeably with internet or web.

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CMS

Initialism for content management system. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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co-

In general, don’t hyphenate words beginning with co- such as coordinate, cooperate, and coexist, unless co- is followed by a proper noun or it is absolutely necessary to avoid confusion.

For more information, see Hyphens.

For word usage of specific terms, see The American Heritage Dictionary.

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codebase

One word. Not code base or code-base.

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combo box

Two words. It’s OK to use combo box in developer documentation and for a technical audience to describe a box in which the user can enter or select a value.

Avoid using in user documentation and for a general audience. Instead, refer to it as a box.

For more information, see Dropdown list, combo box, and spin box.

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command

In general, emphasize on the task to be accomplished, rather than how the user should interact with the UI element. If you have to use a descriptor, use command.

It’s OK to use item or option in the context of commands.

For more information, see Command-line syntax.

See also command line, command-line, command prompt.

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command line, command-line

Use two words as a noun. Hyphenate as an adjective.

Describe entering commands at a command prompt not on a command line.

See also command, command prompt.

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command prompt

Don’t use command-line prompt, C prompt, or system prompt.

Describe entering commands at a command prompt not on a command line.

For more information, see Command prompt.

See also command, command line, command-line.

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compile

It’s OK to use compile as an adjective, as in compile-time, or as a verb. Don’t use as a noun.

See also compile time, compile-time.

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compile time, compile-time

Use two words as a noun. Hyphenate as an adjective.

See also compile.

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comprise

Don’t use. Instead, use is composed of, consists of, contains, includes, or a contextually appropriate term.

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computer

Use to describe a computing device other than a mobile device.

Don’t use mobile computer, portable computer, machine, or unit.

See also device, PC.

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config

Avoid using whenever possible. Instead, spell out the entire word in a non-code context such as configuration or configuring. It’s OK to use config when referring to, for example, a data structure or a file with that name.

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connect

Don’t use connect when you mean plug in.

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cons

Don’t use. Instead, use disadvatanges, drawbacks, or a contextually relevant term.

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control

In general, emphasize on the task to be accomplished, rather than how the user should interact with the UI element.

In user documentation, don’t use control when you need to describe the UI element used to set a value on a continuous range of possible values, such as screen brightness or volume. Instead, use slider.

In other contexts, it’s OK to use control.

For more information, see UI elements.

See also slider.

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copy

Use instead of cut as a verb to describe temporarily moving text to the clipboard.

You copy a file to a disk, not on a disk or onto a disk.

See alos cut, cut-and-paste, move.

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corrupted

Avoid using. Instead, rewrite the sentence to include a more empathetic and inclusive statement. Offer help in fixing the problem if possible.

Don’t use corrupt.

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country, country or region

Avoid using country when referring to a geographical area. Instead, use country or region or just region.

Don’t use geography or geo as a synonym for country or region.

It’s OK to use country/region where space is limited.

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cPanel

Use lowercase c and capitalize P.

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CPU

Initialism for central processing unit. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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crash

Don’t use. Instead, use fail for disks or other hardware, or stop responding for programs or operating systems.

See also fail, stop, stop responding.

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CRUD

Acronym for create, read, update, delete. Use uppercase.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

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CSS

Initialism for Cascading Style Sheets. Use uppercase.

Don’t use a filename extension to refer to a type of file. For example, use CCS file file rather than .css file.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information, see Referring to file types.

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CSV

Initialism for comma-separated values. Use uppercase.

Don’t use a filename extension to refer to a type of file. For example, use CSV file file rather than .csv file.

For more information about spelling out abbreviations, see Abbreviations.

For more information, see Referring to file types.

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Ctrl

Abbreviation for Control. Capitalize.

Use Ctrl only in UI, tables, or headings where space is limited. Otherwise, use Control as in Control key or Control+C.

Don’t use CTRL or ctrl.

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currently

Don’t use currently to imply that a feature or functionality might become available in the future.

Example

Warning: Not recommended: Full site editor is currently not supported on this theme.

For more information, see Documenting future features.

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cut, cut-and-paste

It’s OK to use cut-and-paste as an adjective.

Don’t use cut-and-paste or cut-and-replace as a noun or verb. Instead, use delete. It’s OK to use paste by itself.

Don’t use cut as a verb to describe removing or deleting something. Instead, use delete.

Don’t use cut as a verb to describe temporarily moving text to the clipboard. Instead, use move or copy.

See also copy, delete, move.

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cyber-

In general, don’t hyphenate words beginning with cyber- such as cybersecurity, cyberspace, and cyberattack, unless cyber- is followed by a proper noun or it is absolutely necessary to avoid confusion.

For more information, see Hyphens.

For word usage of specific terms, see The American Heritage Dictionary.

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