Call for design: Site Health Check project

What is it?

Some of you may have heard of the Health Check plugin – It’s a very useful tool that shows people how their website is doing technically. It displays all the relevant technical information about a WordPress installation and offers tips on what to improve.

What’s the current status?

The intention is to evolve this pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party into something really awesome where (parts of) it can be merged into coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. The main issue is that it needs a UXUX UX is an acronym for User Experience - the way the user uses the UI. Think ‘what they are doing’ and less about how they do it. and UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. overhaul. Right now the plugin mostly consists of grey pages with lots of words and numbers on them, some of which are SO long that I had to crop the screenshot by half to get it to upload:

(Click to enlarge)

What do we want to improve?

There are lots of good tools there, but we need to make sure people know how to use them, and why they should. So even before making any designs, we should think about the UX of the plugin as a whole. Questions like:

  • Does its structure make sense?
  • What should the onboarding be like?
  • How can we make it fun to interact with this thing?

What’s the plan?

The improved Site Health Check is aiming to be ready for WordPress 5.2, which is roughly estimated to come out in Q2 of 2019. That’s not loads of time, and we are a very small team at the moment (@clorith, @miss_jwo and myself), so we’re looking for any input on the above questions.

I’ve started a central issue on the plugin’s GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ repo to discuss the UX, any contributions are welcome there: https://github.com/WordPress/health-check/issues/227

I’m hoping to work out new layouts and flows in the next few weeks, and then start designing the final look at the end of February at the latest. That’s around the same time 5.1 is slated to come out, and should give us enough time to implement everything.

Worth noting is that we want to try to apply the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ style to this. It would be a nice test case of what WordPress’ intended new design direction will look like outside of the editor, and it matches nicely with previous design work done around this project.

How can I help?

Like I said, feel free to drop by the Github issue to help us come up with a great user flow. We have an opportunity to reshape the UX of this thing, so I want to get as many eyes on it as are willing and able. Sketches, thoughts, reference material to look at, it’s all good. I’ll be dropping more sketches there in the coming days, any feedback is welcomed.

You can download the current stable version of the plugin to try on your own WordPress site from here: https://wordpress.org/plugins/health-check. Note that that doesn’t include the new actionable traffic-light-based site status section you can see in the screenshots above. Of course, if you know what you’re doing you can compile a build from the develop branch on the repo to see the latest progress.

There is also a section in the Handbook that describes how to use the Site Health Check Plugin: https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/appendix/troubleshooting-using-the-health-check/

And at the link below you can find a comprehensive post about the research @miss_jwo did that led to this point, and the broader context of this plugin in the Site Health project:

I’ll try to keep you updated on our progress roughly every week here on the design blog.

#design, #plugins, #site-health-check, #ux