Shiny Updates Chat

While 4.5 came a little too early for Shiny Updates v2, I think it would be worthwhile to try getting the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party and theme management changes into WordPress 4.6. Regular chats have been dormant for a while, but I’d like to continue them starting Tuesday April 26 at 19:00 UTC in the #feature-shinyupdates SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel.

Topics for this first chat will include remaining work, the need for more user tests, how to proceed with update-core.php changes, and a schedule for 4.6 inclusion of shiny theme/plugin installs/updates/deletes.

There are still plenty of opportunities to get involved and help bring this iteration over the finish line. Please come join us next week and contribute to the abolishment of The Bleak Screen of Sadness™.

#4-6, #shiny-updates, #upgrade-install

Shiny Updates v2

Shiny Updates v2

What is Shiny Updates?

With the stated goal of “Hiding the The Bleak Screen of Sadness”, the shiny updates team is working on bringing a smoother experience for managing plugins and themes to WordPress.

Shiny Updates v2 is an effort to continue the shiny updates effort from WordPress 4.2. The original shiny update feature only includes shiny pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party updates. The new version aims to extend this to all aspects of updates, installs, and deletes for plugins, themes in WordPress.

There are numerous screens in the Adminadmin (and super admin) that allow you to install, update, and delete themes, plugins and WordPress itself. Shiny updates is exploring ways to improve their design and especially to offer a better user experience by improving perceived performance and limiting confusing notifications.

What does it do?

The shiny updates plugin currently enables the following features:

  • Deleting single plugins, bulk updating and bulk deleting plugins from the plugin page.
  • Shiny plugin installs from the plugin install screen: multiple actions can be queued up.
  • Shiny theme installs, updates, and deletes, multiple queue-able, including multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site.

What is still being worked on?

Currently the team is brainstorming a complete rethink of the coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. updates page (update-core.php), working to improve clarity and enable easier Update All functionality. Work on that is happening here: https://github.com/obenland/shiny-updates/issues/5

How can I help?

Anyone can help by testing the plugin! Download and install the plugin, then test out all the shiny features: try installing, updating, and deleting plug7ins and themes, including bulk actions, on both single and multisite. Does everything work as expected? Are there any jarring flows? Missing notifications?

Please report any issues on the Github repository, or drop in the #feature-shinyupdates channel in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. to ask questions or give feedback. It’s also where we have our weekly chats, on Tuesdays 19:00 UTC. Thank you!

P.S. Props @adamsilverstein for ghost-writing this post.

#feature-plugins, #needs-testing, #shiny-updates, #upgrade-install

Ideas for plugin/theme install/update UIs

In the last few releases, the theme and pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party installers received new UIUI User interface. But the actual procedure of installing a plugin or theme is still old-school: a JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/. alert confirms you actually did want to install something, then you get taken an ugly screen that prints out sentences of “Downloading package,” etc. If there is an error, everything stops. If it succeeds, you can activate what you just installed or go back to where you came from.

To say this is not the best experience is an understatement. We can streamline this entire flow while also adding some new functionality. Here’s the goal: Installing or updating a plugin or theme should not blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. you from continuing what you were doing. Secondarily: unnecessary and sub-par user interfaces should be eliminated.

Some ideas:

  • You should be able to install a plugin/theme without leaving the installer screens.
  • You should be able to continue searching and browsing for other plugins (or themes).
  • Multiple plugins/themes should be able to be queued for installation at once.
  • Progress is shown directly inside the installer. Details are only shown if there is an error.

How are we going to do this?

  • Once an install starts for an item, we can “lock” that item to the top left of the results, even if the user keeps browsing or searching for other things.
  • The plugin installer is not yet dynamic, so we’ll need to add infinite scroll and such to allow for continuous browsing (something we avoided doing in 4.0 due to time constraints).
  • We’ll need to come up with a UI for installing a plugin, such as a card-flip, a subtle progress bar, or button changes (“Install” “Installing…” “Installed!”).
  • Updating plugins, themes, and coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. (from the Dashboard → Updates, Plugins, and Themes screens) should be seamless and happen inline, which will be a completely different UI from installing.
  • We must make sure a user abort (leaving the page) is prevented and/or doesn’t stop the update. We must probably make sure that updates are queued (only one actually happening at once), as we have to take into account maintenance mode, conflicts, I/O operations, and such.
  • If the user is forced to enter FTPFTP FTP is an acronym for File Transfer Protocol which is a way of moving computer files from one computer to another via the Internet. You can use software, known as a FTP client, to upload files to a server for a WordPress website. https://codex.wordpress.org/FTP_Clients. credentials, we can request it once in a modal, then send it with each Ajax request — much nicer experience.

The tracking ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. is #29820. Thoughts, ideas, challenges, suggestions, questions welcome.

#plugins, #themes, #upgrade-install

Introducing plugin icons in the plugin installer

WordPress 4.0 comes with a redesigned pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party installer. Just now we’ve added one of the finishing touches to this project — plugin icons.

Plugin authors, If your plugin is compatible with WordPress 4.0, it only takes a few moments to change a readme “Tested up to:” value to 4.0. Compatibility information is prominently shown in the new plugin installer, so you’ll definitely want to update this value. For your plugin to stand out, you’ll also want to give your plugin an icon. Read on…

Akismet

Beautiful, auto-generated icons

Default icons are generated using the GeoPattern library by Jason Long of GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. If you have a banner image, it is automatically sampled to determine the primary color for the pattern, using Tonesque from @matveb. (Cool, huh?)

mosiac-2

Making your own icon

Plugin icons are 128 pixels square. HiDPI (retina) icons are supported at 256 pixels square. Like banners, these go into your /assets directory and can be either a PNG or JPG. So just create assets/icon-128x128.(png|jpg) and/or assets/icon-256x256.(png|jpg) and you have an icon.

You also have another option: SVG. Vectors are perfect for icons like this, as they can be scaled to any size and the file itself is small. For an SVG file, you simply need an assets/icon.svg file.

We may implement SVG-to-images fallbacks in coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. for browsers that don’t support them, so if you go the SVG route, I’d suggest also turning your SVG into a PNG. (SVG takes precedence.)

Jetpack uses an SVG icon:

Some tips when designing an icon

  • Keep it simple! The Android and iOS Human Interface Guidelines both have some fantastic design tips.
  • Avoid text, especially since these may be seen at smaller sizes in other contexts (and in languages other than English). And because this is an icon, not an ad.
  • Use the right image format for what you’re doing. Don’t use JPGs for simple designs; don’t use PNGs for photos.
  • Optimize your images! Use something like ImageOptim or your favorite web app, CLICLI Command Line Interface. Terminal (Bash) in Mac, Command Prompt in Windows, or WP-CLI for WordPress. tool, etc.
  • Please no WordPress logos. Come up with your own brand. (If you already have a banner image, you likely already have a head start here.)
  • If you haven’t worked with SVGs before, they’re pretty cool. Here’s a tutorial from Chris Coyier.
  • Keep in mind this is an icon for your plugin, not a display ad.

Some examples

Akismet, Jetpack, and Hello Dolly already have icons. You can see their assets directories herehere, and here.

Thanks to the hard work of Alex Shiels (@tellyworth) for implementing this!

#4-0, #dev-notes, #plugins, #upgrade-install