Summary, Dev Chat, April 17, 2024

Start of the meeting in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., facilitated by @joemcgill.

Announcements

The WordPress 6.5 retrospective post has been published, please fill in the survey if you would like to leave feedback or suggestions for improvements to the release process.

Forthcoming Releases

Next major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.: 6.6

We are currently in the WordPress 6.6 release cycle. The deadline for leaving feedback on this Planning Proposal post has ended, and we expect a release squad to be announced soon. Please leave a comment if you have any updates to share about this.

Next maintenance release: 6.5.3

WordPress 6.5.3 will be the next maintenance release. @jorbin published this post outlining the schedule.

@jorbin shared:

Work on WordPress 6.5.3 is progressing. The target for release is 7 May and there are bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrubs happening twice a week.

Of the tickets I’ve reviewed so far, https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/60992 feels like the highest priority. It has a patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. on it that could use some extra testing.

For the full schedule of scrubs or if you aren’t a bug gardener and want to suggest a ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. for the milestone, see
https://make.wordpress.org/core/2024/04/15/wordpress-6-5-3-an-upcoming-maintenance-release/

As with all minor releases, any and all help is appreciated.

Slack reference

@afragen confirmed that the expected behaviour of the patch for #60992 is: The patch for 60992 allows the redirect after the Activate button on the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party card in plugin-install.php. There continues to be no redirect for the Activate button in any modal, ie “More Details” or “View details” modals.

@costdev confirmed that they’re confident we can land the resolution for 6.5.3.

Next GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ release: 18.2

Gutenberg 18.2 is scheduled for April 24 and will include these issues.

Discussion

There were several proposed discussion topics for today:

  • How can we get PHP8 support completed and out of “compatible with exceptions”: suggested by @jorbin
  • Aligning the coding standards for CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and Gutenberg so that both can use the same tooling: also suggested by @jorbin
  • Revisit syncing editor packages early and throughout the release cycle: suggested by @jeffpaul

How can we get PHP8 support completed and out of “compatible with exceptions”

On the first topic, @jorbin noted that: PHP8 support feels to me like one of those things that is kind of stagnent and I would love to see some movement towards full and complete support for all PHP8 versions. I wanted to bring it up as a topic to see if others agree or if people think the current core stance is good.

There is not currently an active effort to reach full support for PHP8.

@jeffpaul noted that: PHP Compatibility and WordPress Versions handbook page that shows PHP8 support (betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. support, compatible with exceptions).

@oglekler mentioned that: I am mostly working with 7.4 and from times to times have surprises like this: #46338.

There are 42.5% of WordPress sites using PHP8+ according to https://wordpress.org/about/stats/.

@ironprogrammer mentioned this related proposal: Proposal: Criteria for Removing “Beta Support” from Each PHP 8+ Version.

@joemcgill suggested this may be a conversation that needs to start in #core-php to see if there is already an active effort in place to continue making progress, and if not, try to kickstart the process.

@jorbin noted that the outline the criteria and process for reviewing each "beta support" PHP version with each WordPress major release  item is what is needed to get completed to move this forward. And then clearing out the php-compatability focus.

@joemcgill added that it seems like one of the biggest risks currently is that WP continues to show only beta support for supported PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 or higher versions once 8.4 is released later this year, so it would be nice to make progress on this.

@costdev highlighted that this effort should be led by a sponsored contributor, due to the amount of work involved. @jorbin mentioned that if there is a host who wants to sponsor this, please get in touch via a DM or a comment on this post.

Aligning the coding standards for Core and Gutenberg so that both can use the same tooling

@jorbin kicked off this topic with:

This is inspired by two things:

  1. The lack of prettier / mismatched tooling for JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. between the two repos
  2. The conversation/PR a few months back to remove the WordPress-Docs ruleset from Gutenberg

It’s also something I was just raising for visibility.

Slack reference

@joemcgill noted that: As I recall, this has been mentioned as one of the main challenges to more frequent syncing of GB packages to Core, as well. (e.g., https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/discussions/59786#discussioncomment-8784550)

It looks like @get_dave was planning on writing a Make Core post following the above discussion on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. In that discussion, @antonvlasenko summarised two issues relating to the PHP side:

  1. Developing the missing linters to enforce WordPress Core standards.
  2. Fixing an issue with synchronizing the rulesets between Gutenberg and WordPress to ensure a unified set of linters.

@jorbin mentioned that for the JS side, there likely is going to need to be a mass reformatting commit or two (if it’s similar to the experience from when jshint was first put into place).

Highlighted posts

The full list of posts from the last week in Core can be read on the agenda at this link.

Open floor

@presskopp mentioned: From time to time I like to remind ourselves of the following, never giving up hope to be heard https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/C02RQBWTW/p1627500098438000

@afragen mentioned: Just an FYI. We are working on the merge proposal for Rollback Auto-Update and would like to put it on the agenda for next week.

Props to @joemcgill for reviewing.

#6-6, #dev-chat, #summary

Summary, Dev Chat, April 10, 2024

Start of the meeting in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., facilitated by @mikachan.

Announcements

WordPress 6.5.2 Maintenance and Security Release was released on Tuesday, April 9. WordPress version 6.5.1 could not be released due to a packaging error.

Forthcoming Releases

Next major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.: 6.6

We are officially in the WordPress 6.6 release cycle.

@priethor published this WordPress 6.6 Planning Proposal & Call for Volunteers post recently, and is currently collecting the names of squad and cohort volunteers to share with leadership.

@jeffpaul commented that “at least finalizing the CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. & Editor tech leads and an RCrelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta). would go a long way towards formally kicking off.”

@jorbin said, “I’ve also seen a couple questions about default themes and getting that kicked off during this release, I think getting an answer there would be helpful”

@joemcgill asked, “…what the focuses of this release would be. @chanthaboune originally proposed that 6.6 be held as a maintenance and polish release in this post, but I’m unsure if that’s still the plan.” And later, “To be clear, I’m not necessarily advocating for 6.6 to be mainly a polish release, I just see the need to be intentional in release planning if we want to actually execute that objective.”

Next maintenance release: 6.5.3

There are currently 13 open tickets in the 6.5.3 release milestone.

Later in the meeting @jorbin shared an initial proposed schedule for 6.5.3.

The first minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality. for 6.5 is out, though it was a quick turnaround security release. For a proper minor release, I would like to gather thoughts on the following plan:

  1. @grantmkin has volunteered to help on the editor side (Thank you!)
  2. I would like to suggest a target of 7 May for 6.5.3 with an RC on 2 May. This will allow for about 4 weeks to identify and fix any bugs. I think Tuesday’s have served us fairly well.
  3. To assist in this, I would like to start bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrubs. I’m thinking twice weekly with one focused on tracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. and one on githubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ until we get closer to the release with the last few looking at both bug trackers
Slack reference

Next GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ release: 18.2

Gutenberg 18.1 was released on April 10 and included these issues. 18.2 is scheduled for April 24 and will include these issues.

Discussion

During discussion we checked in on the progress that the 6.5 release coordinators are making on organizing a release retro post (see this thread). @marybaum confirmed that @priethor, @marybaum, and @akshayar are working on this and will update the #6-5-release-leads channel soon.

It was confirmed that retros have been a part of our release process for several previous releases. Many of them can be found by lookin at the retrospective tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.) on this site.

Highlighted posts

The full list of posts from the last week in Core can be read on the agenda at this link.

Open floor

Tony Gravagno proposed that retrospectives could be used for marketing. “People need an occasional reminder and reinforcement that their platform of choice is aggressively maintained, despite occasional press about pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party vulnerabilities … which is all most people see about WP.” He then suggested that this might be better discussed in the #marketing channel.

Damon Cook shared that he has recently added details to the Project Updates and Details area in key Gutenberg GitHub Project boards (example: WordPress 6.6 Editor Tasks). Damon is planning on trying to keep those up to date throughout the cycle.

Screenshot of the status updates screen from GitHub project boards.


This prompted @jeffpaul to ask whether these updates could be provided on make/core to capture a broader audience.

“My lens is for someone who’s not in lots of GitHub issues, PRs, or boards and finds it hard to stay current on what’s transpiring there and thus not as able to contribute without that context.  Trying to find ways to bring some of that scattered context back to make/core for broader consumption and contextual understanding.”

Damon was open to experimenting on how to best cross-share info in both places. “…for now, I just wanted to make folks aware that I’ve started utilizing the feature and can even deactivate or remove it if it is confusing.”

The full conversation about these status updates starts here.

@dmsnell wanted to remind folks about his proposal to remove support for HTML4 and XHTML. “Doing this is mostly ceremonial, since those formats aren’t supported in reality. Removing them officially though gives us liberty to modernize existing code and improve WordPress’ HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers.-handling reliability. More info in the linked ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker.#59883“.

Props to @mikachan for reviewing.

#6-6, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

Summary, Dev Chat, April 3, 2024

Start of the meeting in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., facilitated by @joemcgill.

Announcements

WordPress 6.5 “Regina” was released yesterday! Thank you to everyone who worked on, tested, and supported this release 🎉

Forthcoming Releases

Next major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.: 6.6

We are officially in the WordPress 6.6 release cycle. @priethor published this WordPress 6.6 Planning Proposal & Call for Volunteers post last week. Please take note of the following callouts on that post:

  • Please leave your feedback about the schedule and release squad size in the comments by April 7th.
  • If you are interested in participating in WordPress 6.6’s release squad as a lead or as a cohort, please show interest in the comments, specifying the role and the type of involvement (lead/cohort).

@colorful-tones and @fabiankaegy will be covering and merging TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress./GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ Triagetriage The act of evaluating and sorting bug reports, in order to decide priority, severity, and other factors. for 6.6, and if anyone has any recommendations to streamline things for overall Triage to make lives easier, then please reach out to them.

For 6.6, we discussed considering not having a sticky post for the bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrub schedule and instead ensuring the schedule is linked at the top of the main release page.

We also discussed 6.5.1, and noted that @jorbin published a post: Initial Bug Scrub for 6.5.1 for tomorrow. @fabiankaegy mentioned that the editor team have created this new board in GitHub to track any editor-related issues that may be candidates for a point releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality.. Currently, there are 5 tickets with the backport to wp minor release label.

We also already have quite a few tickets targeted for the 6.5.1 milestone, so any eyes before the initial bug scrub will likely help that be more efficient.

Next Gutenberg release: 18.1

The next Gutenberg release will be 18.1, scheduled for release on April 10, and will include these issues.

Discussion

We began by discussing any potential follow-up actions and reflections following the recent 6.5 release. @fabiankaegy asked about starting a conversation about possibly evolving how we approach the field guideField guide The field guide is a type of blogpost published on Make/Core during the release candidate phase of the WordPress release cycle. The field guide generally lists all the dev notes published during the beta cycle. This guide is linked in the about page of the corresponding version of WordPress, in the release post and in the HelpHub version page. and dev notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include a description of the change, the decision that led to this change, and a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. in future releases.

@jorbin has previously opened a related proposal to updating the field guide. We discussed where the most appropriate place was to start a conversation like this, and whether it sits more with CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., Docs, or Project. As it touches on many different areas and how we do things within software release cycles, then it seems to fit more into the Core team’s scope.

@audrasjb suggested this may be good to discuss in the future #6-6-release-squad Slack channel so maybe the squad could discuss it in the open with the future Docs Leads and come up with a formal proposal for 6.6 on Make/Core.

@joemcgill also proposed arranging another release retrospective post to collect feedback about the release while it’s still fresh in people’s minds. @chanthaboune mentioned being able to do this in any way that works for folks. For 6.4, we collected the data in an anonymized format and then that data was shared on make/core, and we discussed potentially following a similar approach for 6.5.

Highlighted posts

The full list of posts from the last week in Core can be read on the agenda at this link.

Open floor

We started by highlighting this PR for the WP Importer in support of the Font Library from @mmaattiiaass.

@kkmuffme mentioned that they’re looking for reviews on several PRs, listed in this message and this message.

Two additional issues that were raised in the agenda comments were:

  • https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/15117 – “the excerptExcerpt An excerpt is the description of the blog post or page that will by default show on the blog archive page, in search results (SERPs), and on social media. With an SEO plugin, the excerpt may also be in that plugin’s metabox. regressionregression A software bug that breaks or degrades something that previously worked. Regressions are often treated as critical bugs or blockers. Recent regressions may be given higher priorities. A "3.6 regression" would be a bug in 3.6 that worked as intended in 3.5., that impacts all plugins incl. WooCommerce”
  • https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/59270 – “adding border setting to columns”

This issue was highlighted: Responsive previewing and device-specific editing. Nolan asked what the best way was to make a decision on the issue, as this has been open for 4 years. @annezazu replied with:

I understand that’s an important issue — it has been for a long time! I know some designers have recently chimed in there and there’s some momentum gathering. The best thing to do at this point is to be specific and keep sharing what would be helpful. Beyond that, the main blockerblocker A bug which is so severe that it blocks a release. is finding solid design solutions and finding specific/targeted ways to implement as anything that is implemented has to be maintained.

Also, @webcommsat highlighted a forthcoming contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. which is looking for core input and people to join. More info on here on Slack.

Props to @joemcgill for reviewing.

#6-5, #6-6, #dev-chat, #summary