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  • Aaron Jorbin 8:52 pm on March 30, 2016 Permalink |
    Tags: , , field guide   

    WordPress 4.5 Field Guide 

    WordPress 4.5 is the next major version of WordPress and with it come some bang bang changes. This guide will describe many of the developer-focused changes to help you test your themes, plugins, and sites. So grab a ☕️ ,🍷,🍵, or 🍺 and get ready for what’s coming soon.

    JavaScript! and CSS!

    Multiple external libraries have been updated with the two that require your attention being Backbone and Underscore. There were some‼️ breaking changes ‼️ with these two libraries, so make sure to test your code if you use either of these.  jQuery and jQuery Migrate have also been updated, please test with the unminified versions in order to ensure future compatibility with WordPress.

    The script loader has been updated with three big changes. The build process no longer creates wp-admin.min.css, wp_add_inline_script() joins the family of functions, and better support for multigenerational dependencies is included.

    Term Edit Page! –‼️ Backward Incompatible change‼️

    The term edit screen has been separated out from the term list screen. This brings greater consistency to how the admin generates screens for terms and posts but at the cost of the need to change how you register scripts and how you detect that you are on a term edit screen.

    Live Preview: Faster, Extensible, More Features!

    Live Preview (also known as “The Customizer”) once again has received attention this release with the addition of new controls, some performance improvements that require your attention to implement, and a two new user-facing features.

    Setting-less Controls, Device Previews, and Selective Refresh are the three biggest changes you’ll find. Setting-less controls make it easier for you to implement complex interfaces. Device Preview is a user facing feature that allows users to adjust the preview to match the screens on various devices.  This feature includes filters to change the devices users can choose. Selective Refresh allows for changes to appear quicker inside the preview, and you can do so with less code than before. Theme authors need to make changes to take advantage of selective refresh. Luckily, the change will generally result in fewer lines of code needed overall ( more 🍎 than 🍏 ).

    One area that selective refresh helps live preview function faster is with widgets.

    ‼️ If you offer sidebars or a widget in your theme or plugin, please update your code to implement selective refreshBoth themes and widgets need to indicate support, so please update your code accordingly.

    The final change to Live Preview involves a control for a new theme feature, and that is Custom Theme Logos.

    Custom Theme Logos!

    Themes can now offer support for custom logos. Custom Logos add an additional way for users to customize their site and theme developers can customize how custom logos are displayed.

    Image Performance!

    Following up on the introduction of responsive images in WordPress 4.4, WordPress 4.5 is making changes to improve image performance including improved compression settings and smarter handling of image metadata.

    Embed Templates! (and other iterations)

    Iterating on embeds has led to the ability to better customize embeds by adding new templates to the template hierarchy for embeds. Embeds have also had some performance improvements for autodiscovery, the ability to embed the front page of a site, and changes to the iframe of embedded content.

    Comments Component!

    The comments component has a few user-facing changes to make comments easier to moderate. For developers, the most notable change is the ability to adjust field lengths for your custom database schema. Additionally, the rel=nofollow attribute and value pair will no longer be added to relative or same domain links within comment_content.

    Multisite!

    Multisite once again has seen changes with the addition of new filters around site and user creation, and a WP_Site object.

    And more!

    Overall, 372 bugs have been marked as fixed in WordPress 4.5 (so far). There are also dozens of new hooks and dozens of hooks that have received additional parameters. It’s entirely possible that one or more has caused a regression, so please make sure to test your code deeply and report any issues you find.

     
  • Aaron Jorbin 4:18 pm on November 11, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , , field guide   

    WordPress 4.4: Field Guide 

    WordPress 4.4 is the next major release of WordPress and is shaping up to be an amazing release. While you have likely discovered many of the changes from testing your plugins, themes, and sites (you have been testing, right?), this post highlights some of the exciting 🎉changes developers can look forward to. 💥

    Externally Embeddable

    New Embeds Feature in WordPress 4.4

    Using a handful of filters, you can customize how your site looks when it’s embedded elsewhere. As a part of the work around embeds, there are also a couple of new functions for retrieving and displaying embeddable content. The post above also links to a plugin which will remove the ability to embed your site elsewhere.

    REST API Infrastructure Introduction

    The infrastructure to create a REST API has landed in WordPress core.  Adding your own endpoints (or using the latest version of the REST API plugin) is now even easier.  The new embed feature mentioned above uses this new infrastructure.
    Note: If you are using v1 of the API plugin, it is incompatible with 4.4, however an update is planned before 4.4 ships. The update will not use the new REST API infrastructure, so you’ll want to update your REST API usage eventually. If you are using v2 of the API plugin, be sure you’re on beta 5 or later; previous versions do not support WordPress 4.4.

    Responsive Image Insertion

    Through the use of a display filter, image tags in WordPress now include srcset and sizes.  These two attributes to the <img> tag allow browsers to choose the most appropriate image size and download it, ignoring the others. This can save bandwidth and speed up page load times. There are new functions, filters, and an additional default image size available to help with the creation of responsive images.

    wp_title Deprecation Decision

    Since WordPress 4.1, add_theme_support( 'title-tag' ); has been the recommended way of outputing a title tag for themes.  Now, a year later the wp_title function has been officially deprecated. Take a look at this post if you want to see all the great new filters you can use to modify title tags.

    UPDATE 12 November – wp_title has been reinstated for the time being. It is a zombie function.  add_theme_support( 'title-tag' ); remains the recommended way to insert a title tag into your theme, however there were use cases for wp_title that were not accounted for in the original deprecation decison

    Term Taxonomy Tranquility

    WordPress 4.4 is the latest in a string of releases to feature major updates to the taxonomy system. This release introduces of term meta, a new WP_Term class, and a host of other under the hood changes.

    Comment Component Cultivation

    Comment Object and Query Features in 4.4

    Changes to fields output by comment_form in WordPress 4.4

    Comments received love both on the front end of sites and on the backend. On the front-end, the comment field will always appear first, before the name and email fields. This fixes a longstanding bug where the behavior was different for logged in and logged out users.

    Under the hood, comments are now represented by a WP_Comment class and comment queries are now considerably more powerful.

    Multisite Momentum

    Like taxonomy and comments, the multisite features gains a new class, WP_Network. Additionally, there are now *_network_option functions which make it easier to use multiple networks. The linked post also highlights new hooks, some notable bug fixes, and two newly-deprecated functions. If you use WordPress in a multisite environment, this is a must-read.

    Heading Hierarchy Happiness

    Headings on the admin screens are now more semantic. Be sure to update your custom admin screens to follow the proper heading structure. These changes help users of assistive technologies, such as screen readers.

    Twenty Sixteen

    Each year, WordPress releases a new default theme and this year is no exception. Twenty Sixteen is a brand new theme, bundled with WordPress 4.4. Default themes are incredibly popular; be sure to test your plugins to ensure they function well with Twenty Sixteen.

    Other Notes

    So far, this release has had over two thousand commits. There are many additional changes not outlined above including: the removal of support for my-hacks.php(Update Nov 20th: My Hacks support was added back), giving add_rewrite_rule support for an easier-to-read syntax, support for single-{post_type}-{post_name} in the template hierarchy, pretty permalinks for unattached media, and stronger enforcement of the show_ui argument in custom post types. As with every major update, it is very important to test every feature in your plugins and themes to ensure there are no regressions in their behavior.

    Closing

    If you haven’t been testing your themes, plugins, and sites with WordPress 4.4, now is a great time to start. You can grab a copy from svn (or git), download the nightly builds, or install it using the Beta Tester Plugin.

    WordPress 4.4 is not recommended for use on production servers until the final release has been announced on the WordPress News blog. The release is currently targeted for December 8, 2015. Get testing today!

     
    • Xavier Borderie 9:13 am on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very useful, thanks a lot Aaron!

    • Shah Alom 2:29 pm on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very helpful on the first look … Thanks!

    • Ahmad Awais 6:50 pm on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for enlisting everything, Aaron! I’ve been fortunate enough to contribute to the REST API, Headings Hierarchy and Twenty Sixteen theme. Looking forward to WP 4.4 in December.

    • Nisha 12:55 pm on November 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for the update Aaron. Looking forward to new features in WP 4.4.

    • jomarlipon 12:10 am on November 19, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to this update. 🙂

    • dawesi 4:54 am on November 20, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      So great seeing major breaking changes in a dot release. So glad you’re using professional standards and only releasing breaking changes in major versions… oh wait..

      Too many breaking changes, my clients want out of wordpress. It’s your reputation, 4.3 was the WORST software release of any company in the world in 2015, 4.4 better be PERFECT or you’ll be winning more shonkey awards.

      Our clients want OUT if 4.4 breaks ANYTHING out of the box. (2400 wordpress sites GONE overnight)

      Some great features here that should be in 5.0… goes to show this product is off the rails.

      • Samuel Sidler 3:18 pm on November 20, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Hello,

        WordPress 4.4 is considered a major release, just as WordPress 4.3 was considered a major release. WordPress 5.0 will be another major release and no different than WordPress 4.9 or 5.1. More information about our versioning is available in the handbook.

        Regarding quality, note that 4.3 was one of the most solid WordPress releases we’ve had in years, only requiring minor fixes after its release and being adopted at a faster rate than any previous release in recent memory. What issues affected you?

      • demixpress 3:57 pm on November 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The version numbering of WordPress is great, or it may be another Android in CMS.

    • wpsupporthq 4:06 am on November 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks Aaron! This is a great rundown of the upcoming changes.

  • Andrew Nacin 2:35 am on June 7, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: , field guide   

    WordPress 3.4 Field Guide for Developers 

    WordPress 3.4 Release Candidate 2 due to drop any moment, and we’re aim to do a final release of 3.4 early next week. Developers, this is your last pre-release opportunity to test your plugins and themes.

    For 3.3, I wrote up a field guide of things developers need to know. For 3.4, I get to crowd-source it:

    Custom Headers and Backgrounds. Chip Bennett posted a great summary of the API changes on the make/themes blog. Amy Hendrix posted about flexible custom headers. If you are a theme developer, I would strongly suggest you follow the make/themes P2.

    Live Previews (The Customizer). You’ll want to read Otto’s definitive post on the subject, How to leverage the Theme Customizer in your own themes.

    New WordPress XML-RPC API. If you’re interested in the new APIs for custom content types and taxonomies, check out the Codex page, put together by Max Cutler. Max also recapped the bug fixes, test coverage, and other changes on his blog.

    Internationalization/Localization Changes. There’s a document on the translators P2 that outlines the numerous changes here.

    That’s all we have for now! If there’s something we missed that deserves a writeup for developers, leave a comment and I’d be happy to make sure it gets written up here (under the field guide tag).

     
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