Dev Chat Summary: February 22nd (4.7.3 week 4)

This post summarizes the dev chat meeting from February 22nd (agendaSlack archive).

4.7.3 Schedule

  • Planning to release 4.7.3 on Monday March 6, 2017.
  • This will be a bugfix and maintenance release, nothing major.
  • Latest view of what’s in/coming in 4.7.3: Trac report
  • This date is coming up pretty soon.  Ideally anything going into 4.7.3 would already be in trunk.  So please make your remaining commits ASAP.
  • Aiming for a code freeze and release candidate either Friday, February 24th or Monday, February 27th
  • Bug scrub planned for February 24, 19:00 UTC in #core

Customizer team update

  • Looking for help on testing the Media widget (#32417: Add new core media widget) as well as proposal for a minor release
    • There will be a Translation need for this widget
    • @westonruter: I’ll do final touches on the patch via the GitHub PR to avoid stepping on each other’s toes and to run the builds. If you have anything to add to the patch, please push to the feature branch. Otherwise, I’ll manually re-sync new patch changes to the PR.
    • Additional tasks to see this land in a release:
      • 1) Search for plugins and communicate with them [@ipstenu to help]
      • 2) Test and try to break the patch in it’s current form [@jnylen0 to help]
      • 3) Confirm Forums response to the question: “why didn’t you ‘just’ use {{my existing widget}}”?
      • 4) If you have a widget that does similar things, try out compat and/or extensions [@helen to help]
      • 5) Make sure that it looks good in all default themes [@jnylen0, @melchoyce to help]
      • 6) Consider whether the widget should be extendable for plugin authors to add new types [@helen to help]
    • Likely means this won’t land in 4.7.3, but will target an upcomming minor release

Editor team update

  • Looking to continue discussion on browser support, no need for an urgent decision, but there’s been some discussion that core devs might want to be aware of and review. The current Plan B is to include an old version of TinyMCE for the browsers that will not support the new one.
  • Related post with more detail: A quick guide to browser selection models
  • A lengthy, pro/con discussion ensued. @desrosj is working to summarize everything from the conversation, will add some browser stats, and post to Make/Core for the discussion to continue
  • If you have statistics that you feel will be valuable to look at, please to send it to @desrosj and he will try to include it in the conversation summary for further discussion

REST API team update

  • The REST API team has no significant updates since last week.

Trac tickets

  • set of tickets with patches from @mte90 that are looking for review. If someone out there has some time to go through any of these for review/feedback that would be appreciated.
  • #16778: wordpress is leaking user/blog information during wp_version_check()

Community Summit

  • Between now and next Friday, the Core team needs to come up with:
    • 1) a list of topics for the summit
    • 2) A list of representatives to attend the Community Summit
    • 3) One or two contributors who are willing to help with the organization of the event
  • See also: Community Summit 2017: Sign-up Request
  • @jbpaul17 posted to Make/Core request to capture input on the three items above, will capture that input and summarize for review in next week’s dev chat, and then send the Core team response to the Community Summit team by next Friday, March 3rd. Please review the post on Make/Core and respond with your input.

#4-7, #4-7-3, #core-customize, #core-editor, #core-restapi, #dev-chat, #summary

Dev Chat Summary: February 15th (4.7.3 week 3)

This post summarizes the dev chat meeting from February 15th (agendaSlack archive).

4.7.3 Schedule

  • Completed first pass on all tickets in the 4.7.3 milestone, @jnylen0 is reviewing those that “need” to land in 4.7.3, and identifying a release date for 4.7.3 in the coming week

Customizer team update

  • #23601 (Use ACE Code Editor for Theme and Plugin editors) and #12423 (Include Ace (or similar) as default code editor)
    • Topic of discussion is a code editor library to be used in Custom CSS, WP content editor HTML view, file editor, and any other place that code is modified
    • Had planned to go ahead with CodeMirror since it is what Jetpack uses in its Custom CSS module, but @afercia pointed out accessibility problems
    • So we’re looking for insights into best of breed accessible code editor libraries
    • @afercia: looking to to understand if (1.) there’s consensus about introducing some sort of syntax highlighter library (plus other functionalities) and (2.) if it is going to completely replace the current WP content editor HTML view
    • @jorbin: Once one is decided upon, would like to encourage reaching out to the project maintainers and opening a dialogue about things like security and backwards compatibility
    • @helen: each area (Custom CSS, WP content editor HTML view, file editor) needs individual consideration and rationale
    • Goal is to provide a better user experience for when users edit code in WP
    • Custom CSS:
      • #38707: Customizer: Additional CSS highlight, revisions, selection, per-page, pop-out
      • @westonruter this is what #core-customize is most interested in, but picking a code editor library should be done ensuring that it doesn’t cause headaches if code editors are implemented for HTML view and file editor. i.e. the same library should be used throughout core.
    • WP content editor HTML view:
      • @joemcgill: the text editor now is not technically an HTML view, but is a plain text editor that is parsed into HTML. For instance, breaks are turned into `<p>` tags, shortcodes can be typed, etc., so a “code editor” is something slightly different.
      • @helen: per @iseulde and lots of discussions over time, is a little more complicated in that it’s not an actual HTML editor, so is getting rid of wpautop() is a requirement
      • @mike: I’d love to see code highlighting in the HTML view.
      • @afercia: If both the visual editor and the text editor are going to be replaced by Gutenberg and some sort of CodeMirror-like, well the level of accessibility for both is still uncertain and there’s the danger to introduce an accessibility barrier for the main scope of WordPress: entering content.
    • File editor:
      • @jorbin: I seem to remember that having been replaced with something fancier than what is in place now, but that having been ripped out
      • @helen: File editors really raise the question of whether users should be made more comfortable in them vs. being encouraged to use something else.
      • @brechtryckaert: security-wise I’m not a fan of the ability to edit files from the backend, people who are comfortable enough to edit code usually have a prefered editor
    • @jorbin: We already have our agreed upon accessibility coding standards that state:
      • All new or updated code released in WordPress must conform with the WCAG 2.0 guidelines at level AA

    •  @westonruter: if CodeMirror fails this test, as it seems to, then we need input on GPL-compatible code editors that are accessible.
    • @afercia: I propose to discuss this at the next accessibility meeting on Monday, invite people to do research, and possibly involve the testers group.
  • #38900 (Customize: Add REST API endpoints for changesets) and #39634 (Customize: Add REST API endpoints for panels, sections, controls, settings, and partials)
    • Thanks to @kadamwhite we have an initial (empty) feature plugin repo for the REST API endpoints for customization
    • Feel free to watch that repo and be apprised of developments
    • Next steps are to design the endpoints, write the failing tests for them, and then  go about writing the endpoint controllers
    • @kadamwhite: this is the first major effort within other areas of core that are turning up inconsistencies like #39805 (Expose featured_media property on post resources in “embed” context) so I’m excited to see what other improvements we can make as this work continues

Editor team update

  • Working full steam on prototypes, notably the Gutenberg UI prototype
  • The related GitHub repo has quickly become wonderfully active
  • Looking to discuss browser support for the new editor
    • @georgestephanis: So long as it can fall back to something that doesn’t utterly die, it should probably be fine.
    • WP Admin currently supports IE 8
    • Current browser market share
    • @jorbin: I would love to see us not drop support for anyone if possible
    • @joemcgill: Alternately, if we’re going to bump the browser requirements at any point, now is probably the time.
    • @joen: flexbox was mentioned as being nice to use in context of editor UI
    • flexbox support
  • The agenda for the Editor chat today was to discuss how using the UI prototype felt in the past week, and deciding where to take it next
  • We are looking for people to use and provide feedback the prototype, so please take a look if you can!

REST API team update

  • The REST API team has no significant updates since last week.

#4-7, #4-7-3, #core-editor, #core-restapi, #dev-chat, #summary

Customization in 2017

The editor will endeavour to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.

The customizer will help out the editor at first, then shift to bring those fundamental building blocks into something that could allow customization “outside of the box” of post_content, including sidebars and possibly even an entire theme.

Matt

One expectation I want to start with is, customization isn’t just improving the Customizer — our goal is to improve the entire process of setting up a site, from initial installation to something you’re comfortable launching, to making changes to an existing site that has been live for some time. To that end, our goal is to help people accomplish the following:

  • “I want to make a site that I’m proud of that helps me succeed.”
  • “I want to make a site my clients are proud of that helps them succeed.”

The current customization flow in WordPress doesn’t generally facilitate either of those goals without a great amount of work, prior knowledge, and often a lot of additional development. That’s fine if you’ve hired an agency, or you’re a developer building yourself a website — but not fine if you’re a freelance site builder/implementer (a market I see every day in my local community) or are trying to build something for yourself with limited time and budget. If you can install WordPress, either manually or through a host, we should provide you with the tools to build out a website that accomplishes your personal and business goals.

With these goals in mind, what can we accomplish in the first couple months of the year?

  • Demo content on theme switch for an existing site. [#38624]
  • Pain points with lost widgets and menus when switching themes. [#19912]
  • Exploring a better customization-focused onboarding experience.
  • Adding an media widget. [#32417]
  • Adding formatting options to the text widget. [#35243]
  • Adding a code editor to the Custom CSS control, and make additional enhancements. [#12423, #38707]
  • REST API endpoints. [#39634, #38900]
  • Improving Custom Logos. [#38329, #36191]
  • Some more minor Customizer improvements [#37471, #38953, #39389] and continued bug fixing.
  • What else? Please comment.

Throughout the rest of the year, there’s a lot of larger projects that we’ll collaborate with the editor team on:

  • Content blocks, so we can build a better layout editor that helps people build a site that fits their individual needs. [Post]
  • Revisions, so you can visually see the changes you’ve made to your site and revert if you mess up. [#31089, #21666]
  • Drafting, reviewing, publishing, and scheduling changes, so you can get your site looking just right before you push your changes live. [#31089, #28721]

Some of these, like revisions in the Customizer, we can prioritize sooner.

By the end of 2017, we hope you’ll be able to:

  • Have an onboarding experience with smart defaults that guides you towards building the site you want, faster.
  • Build complex, dynamic layouts for your WordPress sites, regardless of your theme.
  • Move any piece of content on your site to a different part of your site, just by dragging and dropping it where you want.
  • Allow you to preview and select page layouts before you create your page.
  • Edit every piece of content where you see it, instead of needing to hunt for it.
  • Set up a basic website without having to jump in and out of multiple admin screens.
  • Live preview any settings that affect how your site looks.
  • Revert changes and see your revision history.
  • Maybe even build your whole site from your phone?

What other customization flows do you think we need to improve? We need your input to help make a better way to build sites with WordPress.

We’ll be doing weekly meetings every Monday. The next meeting is Monday at 1:00PM EST. Join us in #core-customize in Slack to get involved!