WordPress 3.1 uses jQuery 1.4.4, and jQu…

WordPress 3.1 uses jQuery 1.4.4, and jQuery UIUI User interface 1.8.6. You should check your plugins to see if anything broke. If you were enqueueing jquery-ui-core and using the “widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. factory,” or something that depends on the widget factory you will have to update your pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party to enqueue jquery-ui-widget instead. In jQuery UI 1.8.x, the widget factory was separated from jQuery UI coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. Please examine wp-includes/script-loader.php to see the entire dependency tree.

#3-1, #dev-notes

Changes to meta capability handling in 3.1

If you were doing something crazy with custom or metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. capabilities and custom post types in 3.0, you’ll probably want to read #14122.

Custom post types had inconsistent meta capability handling in 3.0. current_user_can( ‘edit_post’, $id ) and current_user_can( $post_type->cap->edit_post, $id ) mapped to different capabilities when capability_type = post. We never called the former in coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., however, so this would have only affected plugins in a very particular situation.

Now, we have the map_meta_cap flag for CPTs, which allows this to be throttled properly. map_meta_cap is also true by default if capability_type = post or page, and no custom capabilities were defined.

Making this post out of due diligence, but I don’t think this should break any plugins, except in the “This was never supposed to work” situation (which I do want to know about).

#3-1, #dev-notes

Plugin activation hooks no longer fire for updates

Following up on @scribu‘s post with further rationale and the 31compat tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.).

The many problems. When pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party upgrades were introduced in 2.8, the activation hook fired for them. The deactivation hook did not. This was inconsistency number one.

When bulk plugin upgrades were introduced on the Tools > Updates screen in 2.9, the activation hook did not fire (during the bulk upgrade). This was inconsistency number two.

Bulk plugin upgrades were given greater prominence in 3.0, with the Updates move to under Dashboard, and a new bulk action on the plugins screen. This made the second inconsistency far more prominent.

Additionally, activation hooksHooks In WordPress theme and development, hooks are functions that can be applied to an action or a Filter in WordPress. Actions are functions performed when a certain event occurs in WordPress. Filters allow you to modify certain functions. Arguments used to hook both filters and actions look the same. could always fire on activation, because that has to be done through the adminadmin (and super admin), but updates don’t. Updates done manually (including SVNSVN Subversion, the popular version control system (VCS) by the Apache project, used by WordPress to manage changes to its codebase.) was just one more instance where we may not have been firing updates. This was inconsistency number three.

We felt that the proper fix was to prevent the activation hook from firing on any upgrades, bulk or not, as this was not intuitive. Sorry if your plugin relied on this undocumented behavior.

The theory behind the right way to do this. The proper way to handle an upgrade path is to only run an upgrade procedure when you need to. Ideally, you would store a “version” in your plugin’s database option, and then a version in the code. If they do not match, you would fire your upgrade procedure, and then set the database option to equal the version in the code. This is how many plugins handle upgrades, and this is how coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. works as well.

The right way to do this. I would do what many other plugins do and do the upgrade procedure as I described, and as Peter and Andy described in the previous post.

Further reading. You can read more about this issue, on ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #14915.

#3-1, #dev-notes

Feature status: * Post Formats landed. D…

Feature status:

  • Post Formats landed. Discussing whether to do a coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. UIUI User interface in 3.1 that themes can optionally enable.
  • Theme Search/Filter is still sitting in rough first draft. Someone volunteered to finish it in the dev chat, but I forget who.
  • Internal linking. Daryl has a patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. that will go in soon.
  • Admin Bar. The first round is in and filosofo is working on a cleanup.
  • Ajaxified Admin. Been in for awhile with scribu addressing bugs as they come up.
  • Update TinyMCE. azaozz updated to the latest.
  • Multi-Taxonomy Queries. First rounds are in and scribu is handling bugs.
  • Custom Post Type Index Pages. Nacin landed the first round.
  • Cleanup Admin CSS. JohnONolan is working on a first pass.
  • QuickPress Function. First round is in.
  • User Admin. First round is in along with removal of dashboard_blog.
  • Network Admin. Continued bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixing. Considering moving theme/pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party/core updates to networknetwork (versus site, blog) adminadmin (and super admin) for multisitemultisite Used to describe a WordPress installation with a network of multiple blogs, grouped by sites. This installation type has shared users tables, and creates separate database tables for each blog (wp_posts becomes wp_0_posts). See also network, blog, site installs.

#3-1

There was some ancient code in WP::parse…

There was some ancient code in WP::parse_request() that looked in $GLOBALS when setting up query vars.

This is no longer the case: [15796]

#3-1, #dev-notes

WP_User_Search has been replaced by WP_U…

WP_User_Search has been replaced by WP_User_Query. WP_User_Search exists, but is deprecated and has been moved to wp-adminadmin (and super admin)/includes/user.php to deprecated.php.

If you were for some reason including wp-admin/includes/user.php and were expecting WP_User_Search, you’ll need to adjust.

#3-1, #dev-notes

The theme mod functions now store their …

The theme mod functions now store their values differently. This has the potential to break plugins that were directly querying these options instead of utilizing the APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways..

If you are using the API, i.e. get_theme_mod(), set_theme_mod(), remove_theme_mod(), remove_theme_mods(), then you’re fine.

Reference: https://core.trac.wordpress.org/changeset/15736.

#3-1, #dev-notes

wp-db.php is now always included. Databa…

wp-db.php is now always included. Database drop-ins should continue to work without any adjustment in most cases (or can be adjusted to work with small tweaks).

This is for performance as we are no longer conditionally including a file. It also allows db.php files to cleanly extend wpdb, which previously required a bit of tinkering.

See https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/14508.

#3-1, #dev-notes

At this week’s dev chat, we’ll start t…

At this week’s dev chat, we’ll start talking about scope for 3.1. We won’t decide things until the following week, but if there’s a feature you think should be in 3.1, suggest it in a comment here, and we’ll discuss as many as we can get through on Thursday.

[Edit: Comments closed as of the start of the 3.1 scope meeting, for organizational purposes.]

#3-1, #agenda

Don’t use the conditional query tags (i…

Don’t use the conditional query tags (is_page, is_post(), is_*) prior to init. In 3.0 and earlier, this merely failed quietly. In 3.1 this will produce a fatal error. We’ll workaround the fatal error prior to the releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. of 3.1, but in the meantime we’ll leave it to serve as a flag for improper use of the query conditionals. If you see a fatal error of the form “Call to a member function is_*() on a non-object” then a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party or theme is using that function prior to init. See ticket 14729.

#3-1, #dev-notes