Editor Chat Agenda: 15 July, 2020

Facilitator and notetaker: @itsjusteileen

This is the agenda for the weekly editor chat scheduled for 2020-07-15 14:00 UTC.

This meeting is held in the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

Even if you can’t makemake A collection of P2 blogs at make.wordpress.org, which are the home to a number of contributor groups, including core development (make/core, formerly "wpdevel"), the UI working group (make/ui), translators (make/polyglots), the theme reviewers (make/themes), resources for plugin authors (make/plugins), and the accessibility working group (make/accessibility). the meeting, you’re encouraged to share anything relevant for the discussion:

  • If you have anything to share for the Task Coordination section, please leave it as a comment on this post.
  • If you have anything to propose for the agenda or other specific items related to those listed above, please leave a comment below.

#agenda, #core-editor, #core-editor-agenda

X-post: Block-based Themes Meeting Agenda for July 15, 2020

X-post from +make.wordpress.org/themes: Block-based Themes Meeting Agenda for July 15, 2020

CSS Chat Agenda: 16th July 2020

This is the agenda for the upcoming CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. meeting scheduled for Thursday, July 16, 2020, 5:00 PM EDT.

This meeting will be held in the #core-css channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If there’s any topic you’d like to discuss, please leave a comment below!

  • CSS audit status updates
    • What is the purpose of recurring reports, and what data is useful in recurring reports?
  • Color scheming updates
    • Is it useful to distinguish custom properties implementation work in ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #49930 and #4999 is ongoing iteration and naming exploration?
    • Review screenshots annotations with an option for naming (#4999)
    • What data do we need to generate a color scheme? e.g. @mixin adminadmin (and super admin)-scheme($color-primary) – the lightness/darkness values for all color schemes will not be the same, so we need to pass more information to the mixin.
  • CSS Latest and Greatest Link Share
  • Open floor

#agenda, #core-css

CSS Chat Summary: 9th July 2020

Full meeting transcript on Slack: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/CQ7V4966Q/p1594328432163400

I (@notlaura) facilitated the meeting.

CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. audit updates

There were no specific audit updates this week. I suggested starting a conversation about next steps for the audit since we have a good amount of data collected in the Google Doc, but that is not an ideal format for presenting the data. @ryelle indicated that once we figure out what data format will be useful, we can iterate on the CSS audit tool so that it can be run as a report.

@kburgoine asked about the purpose of regular audits – is it just about the numbers, or are there other conclusions we can makemake A collection of P2 blogs at make.wordpress.org, which are the home to a number of contributor groups, including core development (make/core, formerly "wpdevel"), the UI working group (make/ui), translators (make/polyglots), the theme reviewers (make/themes), resources for plugin authors (make/plugins), and the accessibility working group (make/accessibility). based on a regular report?

For now, we can think about what purpose regular audits would serve, and what data we would like to regularly audit (e.g. for tracking a certain initiative or progression in the codebase).

Color scheming updates

@youknowriad reported that has worked on a PR implementing the system of custom properties used in GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ for wp-adminadmin (and super admin), and summarized the work in a comment on ticket #49999. @ryelle clarified that the intent of that ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. was to rethink color schemes to be fully flexible vs. re-doing current color schemes with custom properties. @youknowriad explained that having the variables working at least with one color can get us closer to a full featured system that can support dark mode.

@kburgoine asked if an overall strategy for using custom properties had been defined, and @youknowriad said that the deeper discussions are still to be had, but that having a concrete PR can be useful. He is looking for feedback on the PR regarding the base color, the naming (decided by the implementation in Gutenberg), and iteration / discussion on subsequent variables as needed. @ryelle mentioned that the naming is a sticking point since we have been discussing ways to rethink the naming system.

I asked how, in the Gutenberg mixin, the primary color had been selected since it was not based on a specific variable in the existing color schemes. @youknowriad replied that it was chosen as the most important colors of the color scheme, and @ryelle mentioned it likely had to do with contrast.

CSS Latest and Greatest Link Share

@danfarrow shared a run of CSS Stats on WordPress.org 🙂

I shared Style Stage, a project that is a reincarnation of “CSS Zen Garden” with modern CSS.

That was all for this (last) week!

#core-css, #summary

New CSS styles for buttons with disabled state in WP 5.5

[last modified on July 10, 2020 at 10:58 UTC]

In WordPress 5.5, the styles for both primary and secondary buttons were updated in the WordPress adminadmin (and super admin) to produce a more consistent experience when the buttons are disabled.

Previously, the disabled button styling was inconsistent in the WordPress admin between the default and alternate color schemes. Styling was also different between primary and secondary buttons.

Prior to WordPress 5.5 betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1 was decided to simplify all disabled button states to use the same design. There is no need for disabled buttons to convey primary and secondary visual semantics since the disabled state denotes that status.

This change introduces new unified CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. declarations for disabled buttons:

color: #a0a5aa;
background: #f7f7f7;
border-color: #ddd;

Those above CSS declarations are used both in the WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. dashboard and the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor.

New styles for disabled primary and secondary buttons:

PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party authors and WordPress developers are encouraged to update the CSS styles they use for their buttons with disabled state for better consistency across the ecosystem. Of course, they are even more encouraged to not use custom styles and to rather user default core UIUI User interface styles instead.

Disabled state of buttons can be easily targeted in CSS, for example by using the following selectors:

button[disabled],
input[type=button][disabled],
input[type=submit][disabled] {
	color: #a0a5aa;
	background: #f7f7f7;
	border-color: #ddd;
}

For reference, see the related TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker.: #48709.

Props @whyisjake, @desrosj and @afercia for proofreading.

#5-5, #accessibility, #core-css, #dev-notes

Dev chat summary, July 8, 2020

@whyisjake hosted from this agenda, edited by @marybaum.

Announcements

WordPress 5.5 beta 1 landed yesterday! Tell everyone you know to download it, test everything and try to break all the new features—that’s what betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. releases are for.

@audrasjb  shared some stats: as of Beta 1, WordPress 5.5 has 190 new core contributorsCore Contributors Core contributors are those who have worked on a release of WordPress, by creating the functions or finding and patching bugs. These contributions are done through Trac. https://core.trac.wordpress.org.! A lively discussion followed, covering stats and going back several years, in some detail. Check it out here.

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 8.5 is live!
https://make.wordpress.org/core/2020/07/03/whats-next-in-gutenberg-july/

This is the last Gutenberg releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. going into WordPress 5.5 and is the major focus for this month.

From now until the final release of WordPress 5.5, Gutenberg is also in a feature freeze. That means the only tickets that will move on are bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes and code regressions; everything else will get punted to 5.6 or a future release.

Another result of the feature freeze is that TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. and the Gutenberg should both see fewer last-minute commits. So look for the Beta 2 release party to start a little earlier next week (July 14) in a bow to our European contributors’ schedules.

@pbiron  #50449 could use some 
from those who are knowledgeable about RTL
#50449: Sitemap style for RTL sites

Component check-in

@marybaum announced a schedule change for the about page. She’ll attach the copy and layout to the ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. for 5.5 on Friday. She issued shoutouts to new contributors @abhanonstopnewsuk and @yvettesonneveld for their research with folks in the Marketing team, and @estelaris for in-depth research in design.

@justinahinon updated the group on dev notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. for 5.5 and issued a call for writers. You can see progress on the Trac notes on this Google Sheet  and Gutenberg-related notes here on GitHub.   

Open Floor

@desrosj has a post coming soon that will focus the ongoing discussion of exactly which bugs and tasks get the ticket love in two periods: the beta-to-RC period (for 5.5, that’s now: it started July 7 and will run until RC1 lands on July 28) and the RC-to-release period (for 5.5, the two weeks from July28 to August 11).  

For now, you can see earlier discussion on the topic here.

Finally, @whyisjake brought up a pull request that got his attention because of licensing issues it raises for part of the contributor toolchain.

#5-5-2, #devchat, #summary

#5-5

Accessibility improvements to widgets outputting lists of links in 5.5

When lists of links are displayed on a page for navigational purpose, it can become difficult for users utilizing assistive technologies to navigate between these lists while maintaining an understanding of the purpose of the links. The <ul> element also does not convey proper context.

Starting in WordPress 5.5, a new theme support feature (navigation-widgets) has been added to address this issue. When support is declared, all default widgets included in WordPress CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. that produce lists of links will be output wrapped in the <nav> element. Note: the markup produced inside this wrapper will remain unchanged.

Additionally, an arial-label attribute (which is spoken to users using assistive technologies) is automatically generated based on the widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user.’s title field and added to the nav element to help distinguish each navigation widget from other nav elements on the page (such as a primary navigation).

The feature is fully opt-in. Theme developers must declare HTML5 support for navigation-widgets. For many themes, this may need some additional CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. rules or adjustments to ensure the widgets remain properly styled when outputting the new markup.

Theme developers are highly encouraged to utilize this improvement in their themes. This new theme support feature is an easy way to improve semantics and accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) in all of the sites using your theme.

Widgets affected

The following default Core widgets are impacted by this change:

  • Navigation menuNavigation Menu A theme feature introduced with Version 3.0. WordPress includes an easy to use mechanism for giving various control options to get users to click from one place to another on a site.
  • Archives
  • Categories
  • Pages
  • Recent posts
  • Recent comments
  • MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.
  • RSS

How to declare support

Theme developers are encouraged to declare support for navigation widgets in their functions.php file. This can be done by calling add_theme_support() and passing the preexisting html5 feature with the new navigation-widgets type.

Example

// Declare support for navigation widgets markup.
add_theme_support( 'html5', array( 'navigation-widgets' ) );

// This can be combined with other HTML5 types if supported.
add_theme_support(
	'html5',
	array(
		'navigation-widgets',
		'comment-list',
		'comment-form',
		'search-form',
		'gallery',
		'caption',
		'style',
		'script'
	)
);

For reference, see the related documentation on DevHub.

As mentioned above, an aria-label will be generated for each widget based on the widget’s “Title” field. Below is a screenshot when aria-label attributes are not present to illustrate the problem for users utilizing a screen reader.

The screenshot above shows how the absence of aria-label attributes contributes to a poor experience when utilizing a screen reader. Props @afercia.

The screenshot below shows how the user’s experience is improved when by aria-label attributes.

The screenshot above shows how aria-label attributes helps users utilizing a screen reader to distinguish navigation elements from each other. Props @afercia.

Markup changes

Below is what the output markup looks like when support for navigation-widgets is not declared.

<!-- Without declaration for HTML5 `navigation-widgets` feature support -->
<div class="widget widget_archive">
	<div class="widget-content">
		<h2 class="widget-title">Archives</h2>
		<ul>
			<li><a href="mywebsite/2020/07/">July 2020</a></li>
			<li><a href="mywebsite/2019/12/">December 2019</a></li>
		</ul>
	</div>
</div>

Below is what the new output markup will look like when support for navigation-widgets is declared.

<!-- When the theme declares HTML5 `navigation-widgets` feature support -->
<div class="widget widget_archive">
	<div class="widget-content">
		<h2 class="widget-title">Archives</h2>
		<nav role="navigation" aria-label="Archives">
			<ul>
				<li><a href="mywebsite/2020/07/">July 2020</a></li>
				<li><a href="mywebsite/2019/12/">December 2019</a></li>
			</ul>
		</nav>
	</div>
</div>

Forcing navigation-widgets support

Support for HTML5 navigation-widgets feature can be forced on a sitesite (versus network, blog) by using the new navigation_widgets_format filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output.. This hook determines the type of markup used in widgets that contain navigation links.

This filter accepts two different values: html5 and xhtml. Returning any other value to this filter will output the old markup without these accessibility improvements.

// Force HTML5 markup.
function mytheme_force_semantic_nav_widgets( $value ) {
	return 'html5';
}
add_filter( 'navigation_widgets_format', 'mytheme_force_semantic_nav_widgets');

// Force legacy markup.
function mytheme_force_legacy_nav_widgets( $value ) {
	return 'xhmtl';
}
add_filter( 'navigation_widgets_format', 'mytheme_force_legacy_nav_widgets');

For reference, see the related TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker.: #48170.

Props @whyisjake and @desrosj for proofreading.

#5-5, #accessibility, #dev-notes, #html5, #widgets

Editor chat summary: 8th July, 2020

This post summarizes the weekly editor chat meeting (agenda here) held on 2020-07-08 14:00 UTC in Slack. Moderated by @get_dave.

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 8.5.0 releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software.

  • Gutenberg 8.5.0 was released just prior to the meeting.
  • @youknowriad highlighted:
    • Better Drag and Drop
    • Possibility to upload external images on image blocks
    • A11yAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility): Allow disabling arrow navigation across blocks
    • Anchor support added into most static blocks

WordPress 5.5

  • With Gutenberg 8.5.0 released, the focus now shifts to getting everything ready for inclusion in WordPress 5.5.
  • @ellatrix is maintaining a project board for 5.5 of issues/PRs that need to be completed.
  • @youknowriad noted the importance of:
    • testing Gutenberg 8.5.0 with WordPress 5.5 betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1.
    • those familiar with performance-related work, to do some monitoring and improvements.
  • @andraganescu has helpfully prepared a post which summarises the features expected to be included in WordPress 5.5.

Monthly Priorities

  • In addition to Gutenberg 8.5.0 and WordPress 5.5 the following items were highlighted as priorities for the month:
    • Full Sitesite (versus network, blog) Editing.
    • Navigation screen and navigation blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience..
    • Global Styles.
    • WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. screen.
  • @michael-arestad invited feedback on Full Site Editing flows.
  • @jeffpaul raised a query about the readiness of the Block Directory for inclusion in WP 5.5:
    • are there items the team needs to help with to ensure the non-coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. components are ready for the 5.5 release such that the Block Directory can be considered “ready” for 5.5? (Slack conversation)
    • @tellyworth was invited to provide an update on this.

WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/.

  • @georgestephanis asked for a volunteer to be a point of contact for WordCamp US Contributor day for the Core Editor team.
  • @itsjusteileen volunteered to take on this role (Slack discussion).
  • @youknowriad suggested another “Introduction to Gutenberg contributing” workshop might be a good idea.

Task Coordination

Open Floor

Thanks to everyone who attended.

#core-editor, #core-editor-summary, #meeting-notes

CSS Chat Agenda: 9th July 2020

This is the agenda for the upcoming CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. meeting scheduled for Thursday, July 18, 2020, 5:00 PM EDT.

This meeting will be held in the #core-css channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If there’s any topic you’d like to discuss, please leave a comment below!

  • CSS audit status update
    • Next steps brainstorming
  • Color scheming updates
    • Review screenshot annotations
  • Open floor
  • CSS latest and greatest link share

#agenda, #core-css

CSS Chat Summary: 2nd July 2020

Full meeting transcript on Slack: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/CQ7V4966Q/p1593723636063300

I (@notlaura) facilitated the meeting.

CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. Audit Updates

@danfarrow made some formatting updates on the Google doc containing the audit data, and added an image of the longest selector on a mug:

Longest CSS selector found in WordPress on a mug

Brilliant!

@isabel_brison added an audit of z-index values to the list as well.

Color Scheming Updates

We discussed the ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #50504 for a modern/higher contrast color scheme in 5.5 (mistakenly referred to it as a high contrast scheme, but it is higher contrast). @afercia asked what problem this new color scheme will solve, and why it is using the Sass variables instead of CSS custom properties. @ryelle indicated that we are moving slowly with this initiative, and that for now any new schemes should continue with existing conventions.

The rationale for the new color scheme is a conversation for the design channel, but @youknowriad understood it was meant to modernize the look/feel of WordPress adminadmin (and super admin), and to possibly be the default theme later. @ryelle mentioned it would also be a good pairing with dark mode. In terms of implementation, @youknowriad discussed that there will still be a need for Sass variables, and to be cautious about what values are exposed as CSS variables since it is a runtime APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways.. A CSS variable for the main admin color makes a lot of sense.

@youknowriad noted an issue with the color schemes not applying to secondary buttons (secondary is a term used in GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ though not in wp-admin, and refers to the outlined style of button) that he is working on in ticket #50537. @ryelle noted that that may be intentional for color contrast, and that a specific variable for secondary/default button colors would help with this issue. @youknowriad indicated the colors are adapted for secondary buttons in Gutenberg, and this should be consistent with coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. @afercia noted that a related change was submitted in 5.3 but reverted. It is unclear if that was specifically about the button color or possibly inputs, but in any event, the functionality is inconsistent with core and Gutenberg.

I asked if there are any notes from this incident that we should take into account with the color scheming work, and @afercia mentioned that styling changes in the blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor that are intended to be adopted in core, should be discussed in TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. vs. GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/. I proposed an idea that the same CSS variables that are now used Gutenberg should be used in wp-admin. @youknowriad said this would be great for post-5.5 work.

We then discussed a bit of the distinction between wp-admin CSS and Gutenberg CSS, and the history of the #core-css channel. The #core-css channel came about at the beginning of this year as a avenue for discussing how to use more modern CSS practices in wp-admin. The Gutenberg CSS architecture conversations occurred in the #core-js channel.

@ryelle asked if anyone was actively owning the task to annotate screenshots, and I committed to coming up with at least a starting point to discuss at the next meeting.

CSS Latest and Greatest Link Share

@kburgoine shared “a latest but maybe not greatest” link for CUBE CSS, a new CSS methodology that’s been floating around. Like any methodology, it depends!

That was all for this week. I’m super late posting these notes, but better than not posting them!

#summary