Proposal: Add a dominant color background to images.

Add a dominant color background to images

Contributors to this doc: Paul Bearne, …

  • CategoryCategory The 'category' taxonomy lets you group posts / content together that share a common bond. Categories are pre-defined and broad ranging.: Proposals, Images
  • Tags: feature projects, performance, Images

This proposal seeks to integrate dominant color background for images into WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., targeting the WordPress 6.1 release.

Context

Continuing WordPress efforts to improve performance, members of the performance team have created a feature that identifies the dominant color of an image and adds it as the CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. background to the image tags. This gives the viewer/user a visual placeholder while the image is loading, resulting in an improvement to the perceived performance and user experience.

The feature was originally proposed and developed as a module in the Performance Lab plugin.

Project update

Development of the feature has been ongoing in the Performance Lab plugin repository on GitHub, where it has been implemented as the Dominant Color module, available since 1.2.0.

The recently released version 1.3.0 of the Performance Lab plugin contains the module in a state that is ready to merge into core. You can continue to support this effort by testing this version of the pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party. For new installations, the Dominant Color module should be enabled by default. You can check that and activate the module under Settings > Performance.

The team is currently migrating the module code into WordPress core patches in 2 TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. tickets:

Any feedback on the tickets or reviews on the core patches would be greatly appreciated.

Implementation details

WordPress calculates the color and determines transparency as part of the image upload. This information is stored in the image metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress.. The process of computing the color and transparency adds a little overhead to the image uploading process, so testing this specifically and potentially optimizing it further is crucial for this feature.

When an image with color and transparency metadata is placed in the frontend, a CSS variable is added to the `image` tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.), and a single line of CSS is added to the page `head`. 
We encourage you to test this module (and others) from the Performance Lab Plugin, report any bugs in our GitHub repository, or contribute with fixes and ideas. You can also share any feedback, concerns, or questions to improve these features further in the comments.

Props to @shetheliving @flixos90 for review and proofreading.

Performance team meeting summary 2 August 2022

Meeting agenda here and the full chat log is available beginning here on Slack.

Announcements

  • @shetheliving: Performance bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrub will be held Wednesday, August 3, 2022 at 11am EDT

Focus group updates

Images

@adamsilverstein @mikeschroder

GitHub project

Feedback requested

Object Cache

@tillkruess @spacedmonkey

GitHub project

Feedback requested

Site Health

N/A

GitHub project

  • We’re seeking 1-2 POCs for this group; if you’re interested, please comment here or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.
  • @olliejones: #326 Update Settings language for health checks. #423 is ready

Feedback requested

Measurement

N/A

GitHub project

  • We’re seeking 1-2 POCs for this group; if you’re interested, please comment here or ping in Slack
  • @shetheliving: Reminder about the performance testing environment work started back in March: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2022/03/22/performance-team-meeting-summary-22-march-2022/. This has stalled out since then; if anyone is interested in picking it back up, let us know.

Feedback requested

JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/.

@aristath @sergiomdgomes

GitHub project

  • No updates

Feedback requested

Infrastructure

@flixos90

GitHub project

  • @flixos90 out
  • @mukeshpanchal27: Worked on:
    • Fix unexpected input Warning message during release build/test process – PR #437 needs review; @adamsilverstein to test
    • Use PERFLAB_MODULES_SCREEN constant – PR #463 ready for review

Feedback requested

Module proposal: Database performance Health Checks – @olliejones

  • @olliejones: Proposing a total of eight separate health checks that cover a variety of database issues; more details and mockups here. These would all be in one single module.
  • @shetheliving: Any issues with having these all in one module as opposed to separate, as we’ve done previously with health checks?
  • @adamsilverstein: Not an issue, but concerned about the recommendations for adding keys and if they would be actionable by users
  • @olliejones: The add-keys actions are presented as WP-CLIWP-CLI WP-CLI is the Command Line Interface for WordPress, used to do administrative and development tasks in a programmatic way. The project page is http://wp-cli.org/ https://make.wordpress.org/cli/ commands with a copy-to-clipboard function
  • @adamsilverstein: Right, but what percentage of WP users know what WP-CLI is and use it?
  • @masteradhoc: Important to describe these very well as they’ll be hard for everyone to understand
  • @mukeshpanchal27: Are there other ways to add keys outside of CLICLI Command Line Interface. Terminal (Bash) in Mac, Command Prompt in Windows, or WP-CLI for WordPress.?
  • @olliejones: I have a pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that does this re-keying
  • @shetheliving: Unfortunately we can’t point users there
  • @olliejones: What about a separate module for the health checks that generate CLI commands?
  • @adamsilverstein: Goal here is to build features for core, which means they have to help the majority (80%+) of users, so anything that is specifically for very large sites or uses CLI is plugin territory, not core
  • @zero4281: Since query speed is dictated by rows in a table, can we only display a health check if a site has a certain number of posts/rows?
  • @shetheliving: Since everything in Performance Lab should eventually be merged into core, the CLI-related health checks probably should not be in this plugin
  • @adamsilverstein: Focus on the existing warning to make sure it is “site owner” targeted and maybe drop the keys check entirely. For the advanced part, maybe create a concise guide for the developer handbook to cover important approaches
    • Could be in https://wordpress.org/support/article/optimization/#database-tuning or perhaps on our Performance site
  • @seedsca: What is wrong with WP-CLI? It’s a great tool
    • @adamsilverstein: Agreed, it’s just that it’s not something an average WP user knows about or how to use
  • @shetheliving: VOTE: Do we want to proceed with this proposal as-is, with all eight checks, including the CLI-related ones?
    • At time of meeting, 6 no votes and 1 yes vote
  • @shetheliving: Next step is for @olliejones to revise the proposal to indicate which checks would be included/removed to proceed. Once that update has been made, we can discuss again in a future chat.

Our next chat will be held on Tuesday, August 9, 2022 at 11am EDT in the #core-performance channel in Slack.

#core-js, #core-media, #performance, #performance-chat, #summary, #hosting-community

Dev chat agenda, July 27, 2022

1. Welcome

Last week’s summary.

To continue a theme: devchat is not just for release squads or project leaders, or coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. committers and component maintainers. Did you know that when you sign up for a WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. account, the first channel you join, by default, is the Core channel?

That should tell you: devchat is for everyone who has any interest in the WordPress project—which means you. And when you give your valuable time to join the meeting, that’s a pretty big compliment to the people who are there too. So if you typically come as an observer, let the group know you value that hour in the day enough to spend it with them. And say hey, with a hand-wave or some other emoji.

2. Announcements

Details on WordPress 6.1 are out!

If you have an announcement, please add it to the comments. Or show up to the chat, and you can share it live. Preferably, do both!

3. Blogblog (versus network, site) posts of note

@audrasjb reports in with A week in Core.

Core Editor improvement: deeper customization with more template options, from @greenshady

@critterverse proposes A new kind of default theme.

@pbearne proposes adding a dominant color background for images.

@bacoords would like feedback on this Proof of concept: feature notifications.

And in case you missed it last week, @bph shares what’s new in Gutenberg 13.7.

4. Upcoming releases

The next major is 6.1: squad and schedule have landed! (Reprise)

@annezazu has made some suggestions for the Major Releases Handbook page. There’s a Google Doc where you can help out, in comment mode.

The next minor is 6.0.2.

5. Open Floor

Component maintainers get priority, then early tickets.

After that, the floor is yours! Just add your item to the comments, and the cohosts will recognize you.

See you at the chat!

#agenda, #core, #dev-chat

Moving Core block styling to JSON

An effort is currently underway in the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party, to streamline and standardize the way that blocks are styled by moving key blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. styling into Theme JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML..  This post lays out the reasoning behind this change and the impact it will have for both themes and block authors going forward.

What is theme.json?

Theme.json is a file which provides a single place to configure the behavior of  themes.

It plays an important role in the Full Site Editing project, by storing information about a site’s appearance and providing this in a machine readable format to be consumed by the Editor interface.

One of the key elements of this is the Global Styles interface within the Site Editor which allows users with a UIUI User interface to allow them to modify the default appearance settings provided by their chosen Theme.

Why use JSON to represent a theme’s styles?

Expressing a theme’s styles in JSON gives us several benefits:

  1. It enables users to modify the visual appearance of their site via the UI provided by Global Styles, without needing to write any CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets..
  2. We have more control and consistency in how the theme CSS is output, so that we can ensure that user’s settings take priority over theme’s settings, and theme’s settings take priority over coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.’s settings.

What is changing?

To expand the number of customisation options available to users through the Global Styles UI, we need to configure the default visual appearance of blocks using the same tools that will be used to customize these blocks.  This will make it trivial for themes to overwrite the default styles of a block.

In practical terms this means we need to move the rules that define default block appearance from CSS files, to machine readable JSON files, such as `theme.json` & `block.json`.

How can blocks define styles in JSON?

To make the process of moving core block styles into JSON, some new affordances have been created. 

One of these is that the JSON rules for a block can be saved in the block.json file under a new `__experimentalStyles` key.

For example margins on the image block were expressed in CSS like this:

.wp-block-image {
	margin: 0 0 1em 0;
}

Since this change we can now define margins for image blocks in the block.json file like this:

{
	“__experimentalStyle”: {
		“spacing”: {
			“margin”: “0 0 1em 0”;
		}
	}
}

The CSS that is generated from this change is the same as the original CSS file.

For more details on this approach please see “merging block CSS with theme.json styles”. You can also see an example of how this would be implemented in “Block CSS: Move CSS from the stylesheet to the block definition”.

What are the benefits?

Styles are now customizable

The driving force of this change is to enable users to modify the visual appearance of their site via the UI provided by Global Styles, without needing to write any CSS

However this change also has some very important, and useful, side effects.

CSS specificity and performance

For a long time blocks and themes have been struggling with CSS specificity – blocks want to ensure that they provide enough rules that they look good, whilst themes want to override these rules so that different blocks have a consistent appearance (for example ensuring all your buttons look the same). 

This has meant that blocks have to be very careful about the specificity of the selectors in the CSS they provide, to enable themes to override them. 

By expressing visual styles in JSON, and compiling them as part of the main CSS output of global styles, the order and importance of each rule is clear and computable when the theme.json files are processed.

Global Styles processes the different levels of JSON settings, by merging each of these JSON objects together. Once all of the settings are combined, the Global Styles CSS is generated using the final merged result. This means that the resulting CSS only contains the rules the theme needs.

For those not familiar with how rules in Theme JSON files are turned into valid CSS rules here’s a quick refresher. There are x3 “levels” of JSON file:

  • WordPress Core Theme JSON – this holds the base level styles for WordPress.
  • Theme JSON – this is the `theme.json` file from the currently active Theme which provides theme-specific styles.
  • Custom User Styles – these are rules provided by the Global Styles user interface and have the highest level of importance.

When these different JSON representations of styles are merged together, we only preserve the rules for the uppermost setting for each rule before they are converted to CSS rules. 

By moving block CSS rules to JSON we effectively insert a new level into this hierarchy with WordPress Core `theme.json` being overridden by block styles in `block.json` which is overridden by the `theme.json` provided by the theme which is in turn overridden by custom user styles, created in the Global Styles UI.

For clarity the new rules hierarchy is:

  • WordPress Core Theme JSON
  • Block styles in Block JSON
  • Theme styles from Theme JSON
  • Custom User Styles from Global Styles UI.

This also means that the total CSS output of the system will be smaller, which is a performance benefit. 

Exposing default styles

Another benefit of this change is that the default styles for each block are now exposed in the Global Styles UI, before the user makes any changes, so the starting point is obvious and clear. Now that blocks can define most of their styles in JSON, these default styles can be more easily seen and  configured using the Global Styles interface.

Not only are the styles of blocks themselves configurable but the lower level elements used within blocks can also be exposed to the Global Styles UI.

What are elements?

Elements are low level components for themes and blocks, which don’t need the complexity of blocks.

Block composition has not reached a level of infinite composability, hence it is not always possible or good to use, say, the heading block instead of a HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. heading element, or a button block instead of a HTML button element.

Some good examples of these are headings, links and buttons. 

Links are part of many blocks but do not have a block of their own. Headings and buttons are expressed as blocks but many times the block composition limits us, so we’re better off using an HTML heading or button element.

Also, elements are simpler than blocks; they can be used to express semantic features of blocks and enable users to share styles across multiple blocks. For example style rules for the button element will be used in the search block, the file block and the button block.

The number of elements is currently being expanded. Some new elements we expect to add are a caption element and form elements. It is likely some of them will be absorbed into blocks as the block composition APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. gets better, so the implementation of element support is kept at a minimal state.

Putting it all together – exposing default element styles in the UI

If we put these two new concepts (setting default styles in JSON and element styles) together, we can see how the default styles for button elements are now visible in the Global Styles UI:

This helps users to understand the global styles interface more easily as it shows straight away the relationship between these settings and the visual appearance of the block.

Should I set style rules for blocks or for elements?

Theme authors have the option to set styles in `theme.json` for:

  • blocks themselves. 
  • elements within blocks
  • globally for elements shared by blocks.

 It’s important to understand the precedence of each of these options, so you know which one to choose.

  1. Global element styles apply to all instances of an element. These rules will apply across all blocks, to ensure a consistent appearance between all blocks. In some cases this will depend on blocks implementing the elements API to take effect. For example, this would be useful if you wanted to create a style rule that applied to all button elements on your site.
  2. Block styles apply to all instances of that specific block. This is useful if you want to target particular properties of the block itself. For example this could be used to modify the color of all the text within the search block.
  3. Element styles within blocks are the most specific use case. These rules will only apply to elements within a specific block. If users modify global element rules, these the specific customizations for elements within blocks will still take precedence due to their higher specificity, so the user’s global changes won’t apply unless they modify the element settings for that particular block. For this reason this use case should be uncommon. For example, this is useful if you wanted the buttons in your search form to be a different color to the other buttons on your site.

What does this mean for block authors?

Block authors can already take advantage of some of these changes.

Blocks can already start to use the elements API for composing their markup. Right now this only works for the button and captions elements, but as the number of elements is expanded, blocks will be able to compose their markup using these common elements, which will in turn enable them to be better supported by Global Styles.

Blocks can also start to define their style using the `block.json` file, which allows themes to override block styles using `theme.json`, rather than relying on CSS. Styling a block’s supported features within their JSON configuration enables users to modify them via the Global Styles UI.

What does this mean for themers?

This approach gives more tools to themers, to make it easier for themes to have a more consistent style across all blocks without the need for complex CSS. By using the elements section of the theme.json, themes can create style rules that will apply across all blocks that take advantage of these elements, which makes these rules simpler and easier to maintain.

Will this replace the theme’s CSS?

While simple themes may one day be able to replace all their CSS with theme.json settings, it is expected that most themes will still need to provide their own CSS for the more advanced aspects of their design – for example animations.

Is supports > __experimentalStyles the right place for this?

These styles were initially added to supports > __experimentalStyles so that we could begin this work, but ideally these settings would belong in the style key of block.json. There is an open PR to make this possible.

Editor Chat Agenda: 3 August 2022

Facilitator and notetaker: @ajitbohra

This is the agenda for the weekly editor chat scheduled for Wednesday, August 3 2022, 04:00 PM GMT+1. This meeting is held in the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

Gutenberg 13.8 RC. Final release Wednesday 3 august.
Thanks to @mamaduka for tackling this release!

Key project updates:

Task Coordination.

Open Floor – extended edition.

If you are not able to attend the meeting, you are encouraged to share anything relevant for the discussion:

  • If you have an update for the main site editing projects, please feel free to share as a comment or come prepared for the meeting itself.
  • If you have anything to share for the Task Coordination section, please leave it as a comment on this post.
  • If you have anything to propose for the agenda or other specific items related to those listed above, please leave a comment below.

#agenda, #core-editor, #core-editor-agenda, #meeting

Performance Chat Agenda: 2 August 2022

Here is the agenda for next week’s performance team meeting scheduled for August 2, 2022, at 15:00 UTC.


This meeting happens in the #performance channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Make WordPress Slack.

#agenda, #meeting, #performance, #performance-chat

Roadmap to 6.1

It’s time to look ahead at the main areas of work for WordPress 6.1. The tune of the release will be to refine the experiences introduced in 5.9 and 6.0, weave the various flows into more coherent and fulfilling experiences for users, maintainers, and extenders, and close some gaps in functionality as we start to look towards Phase 3 of the GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ roadmap.

Keeping this concise so people can expand through the main Phase 2 project overview.

Template Editor →

Introduce the ability to browse, visualize, and edit the structure of the site. Provide more clarity between global elements (templates, template parts, styles) with the aim of unifying the template editor and the post editor experiences.

There’s a subset of work here around improving the navigation block →

Building With Patterns →

We should be better prepared to fully unlock the potential of patterns as outlined in “Building with Patterns”, which was put together a bit late in the 6.0 cycle. Allow patterns to be a central piece of the creative experience, including tailoring them for custom post types, blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. types, improving the locked down experience, manage saved patterns, etc.

Global Styles →

Blocks & Design Tools →

Continue to make progress on the global styles interface while improving the support for restrictions, privileges, and curated presets. Allow managing webfonts, implement responsive typography, and expand the toolset available to blocks with an eye towards consistency, reliability, and delight.

Themes & Gradual Adoption

There are also several issues around the ability to adopt features like template parts gradually on existing themes, as well as the possibility of getting broader access to theme.jsonJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. editing. It’s also important to continue to look towards theme switching flows and how to best make use of the new possibilities of styles and templates.

#6-1, #gutenberg

Editor chat agenda: 27 July 2022

Facilitator and notetaker: @andraganescu

This is the agenda for the weekly editor chat scheduled for Wednesday, July 27 2022, 04:00 PM GMT+2. This meeting is held in the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

General Announcements and Links.

Key project updates

Task Coordination.

Open Floor – extended edition.

If you cannot attend the meeting, you are encouraged to share anything relevant for the discussion:

  • If you have an update for the main site editing projects, please feel free to share as a comment or come prepared for the meeting itself.
  • If you have anything to share for the Task Coordination section, please leave it as a comment on this post.
  • If you have anything to propose for the agenda or other specific items related to those listed above, please leave a comment below.

#core-editor, #core-editor-summary, #gutenberg, #meeting-notes, #summary

Performance Chat Agenda: 26 July 2022

Here is the agenda for next week’s performance team meeting scheduled for July 26, 2022, at 15:00 UTC.


This meeting happens in the #performance channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Make WordPress Slack.

#agenda, #meeting, #performance, #performance-chat

Performance team meeting summary 19 July 2022

Meeting agenda here and the full chat log is available beginning here on Slack.

Announcements

  • @shetheliving: Our new blog is live at https://make.wordpress.org/performance/! How should we use this moving forward?
    • @flixos90: Thinking we continue to post meeting notes, etc. on CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and cross-post them to Performance
    • @pbearne: Could we use it for articles about performance best practices?
    • @flixos90: Main purpose is to have a single entry point for everything and a handbook for onboarding and best practices
    • @flashusb: Could we have an Email Updates widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. like the other blogs?
    • @flixos90: Would be great to have a sticky at the top explaining that the blogblog (versus network, site) is primarily for cross-posting and link to where most of our content is, including https://make.wordpress.org/core/tag/performance/, https://make.wordpress.org/plugins/tag/performance/, and https://make.wordpress.org/themes/tags/performance/
    • @ollliejones: Can it serve as a place for “more details” articles or site health check results?
    • @flixos90: More about contributing to the team and what the team is doing
    • Moving forward, we’ll continue to post agenda and notes on the Core blog and cross-post to Performance
    • @shetheliving will draft a sticky post for the Performance blog and look into an email updates widget in the sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme.

Focus group updates

Images

@adamsilverstein @mikeschroder

GitHub project

Feedback requested

Object Cache

@tillkruess @spacedmonkey

GitHub project

Feedback requested

Site Health

N/A

GitHub project

  • We’re seeking 1-2 POCs for this group; if you’re interested, please comment here or pingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.
  • @furi3r: Posted feature proposal for Audit Full Page Cache and Full Page Cache Site Health Checks last week; no feedback yet
  • @spacedmonkey: How long do we wait for feedback? https://github.com/WordPress/wordpress-develop/pull/2890 has been approved by two core committers so could be merged ASAP
  • @flixos90: We’re not in a massive rush, wait 2 more weeks for feedback and then merge
  • @spacedmonkey: Won’t be around, so someone else will need to merge

Feedback requested

Measurement

N/A

GitHub project

  • We’re seeking 1-2 POCs for this group; if you’re interested, please comment here or ping in Slack
  • No updates

Feedback requested

JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/.

@aristath @sergiomdgomes

GitHub project

  • No updates

Feedback requested

Infrastructure

@flixos90

GitHub project

  • @flixos90: Published 1.3.0 yesterday and broke 7k active installs for the Performance Lab pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party
  • @mukesh27: A few PRs that need review:
    • Fix unexpected input Warning message during release build/test process #437
    • PHPCSPHP Code Sniffer PHP Code Sniffer, a popular tool for analyzing code quality. The WordPress Coding Standards rely on PHPCS.: Use a period at the end #436
    • Add constant for plugin_dir_path #429

Feedback requested

Open Floor

  • @mukesh27: How about a weekly Bug Scrub for the performance channel for performance-focused TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. tickets? We have a total of 326 right now
    • @shetheliving: Was this intended to be a weekly scheduled meeting?
    • @mukesh27: Yes, if possible
    • @spacedmonkey: There are lots of core issues that are impossible to fix in the plugin and need to be fixed in core
    • @flixos90: Yeah, probably most Trac tickets should be fixed directly as core patches; only tickets that need to be implemented as bigger features should become plugin modules. Always depends on whether core has the necessary integration points to handle that or not.
    • @shetheliving: Weekly may be tough, how about monthly? Let’s start with the first Wednesday of the month at our regular meeting time, so our first one would be August 3, 2022, at 15:00 UTC

#core-js, #core-media, #performance, #performance-chat, #summary

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