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  • Rachel Baker 10:48 pm on May 9, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Comments Bug Scrub Summary, 2016-05-09 

    The 90-minute bug scrub took place in #core-comments and ended in a 1 – 1 tie between @boonebgorges and @rachelbaker. You can read an archive of the bug scrub and discussion: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/core-comments/p1462820499000036.

    Attendees:
    @rachelbaker, @boonebgorges, @aaroncampbell, @ocean90, @samuelsidler, @sidati, @presskopp, and @dshanske

    Bug Scrub:
    #6342 – moved to “Future Release”
    #16365 – moved to “Future Release”
    #16576 – moved to “Future Release” and needs testing for backwards compatability
    #17913 – needs a refresh and screenshots
    #18762 – closed, after testing confirmed this was resolved in 4.4
    #26596 – moved to “Future Release” to limit the scope of the JS selector
    #20302 – moved to “Future Release”, with suggestion from @boonebgorges
    #20977 – moved to “Future Release”, but needs more input to determine how to approach

    Open Floor:
    #36427 – milestoned for 4.6, needs a refresh for the inline docs
    #36564 – needs additional exploration before we can decide how to store the data/time of when a comment was last modified
    #36424 – moved to “Future Release”, and requested a patch refresh and screenshots
    #36409@sidati is going to attempt writing the unit tests

     
  • Ryan Boren 5:22 pm on March 4, 2016 Permalink
    Tags: checklists, pitch, , release-process   

    Release Process Checklists 

    The release process is complex and beyond one person. Releasing is an intricate dance that we haven’t been sufficiently capturing. Knowledge siloed in heads needs to be committed to public, institutional memory. The upcoming 4.5 release is an opportunity to capture every step of the dance so that we can iterate process, automate away lingering drudgery, and improve our cognitive net for the stressful task of releasing to 25%. I like using checklists in this cognitive net. They relieve anxiety, make process transparent, and help teams flow during stress. We already have a couple release checklists. We can build on those while adopting a little checklist culture in a manner empathetic to developers and flow. Pitch:

    Checklist cool tricks

    Checklists…

    • distribute power.
    • push power of decision making to the periphery.
    • provide a cognitive net.
    • make the minimum necessary steps explicit.
    • make sure simple steps are not missed.
    • make sure people talk.
    • capture and shape real flow.
    • inspire flow in emergencies and sustain it through the quotidian.
    • capture flow between teams.
    • encourage a shared culture around flow.
    • accessibly capture institutional memory in the context of flow.

    Attributes of a good checklist

    What makes a good checklist? Checklist shouldn’t be about just checking boxes. Instead of being a chore and an admonishing finger, checklists should fit and assist real flow. The Checklist Manifesto offers these suggestions. Ideally, checklists…

    • are not lengthy.
    • have clear, concise objectives.
    • define a clear pause point at which the checklist is supposed to be used.
    • have fewer than ten items per pause point.
    • fit the flow of the work.
    • continually update as living documents.

    See this checklist for checklists and this example checklist for more.

    Stuff to checklist

    The major release checklist attempts to use pause points and follow the suggestions above. The major and minor release checklists are pretty rough and incomplete and overlap with each other. These and the things to keep in mind list need love and unification with help from developers who are in the release flow and handling controls on the release train.

    about.php is…quite the process. It needs the oxygenating powers of a checklist.

    Checklist Feature plugin merges.

    Checklist bundled theme releases so stuff like this makes it into institutional memory.

    Beta and RC releases.

    Plenty of other stuff. 🙂

    Start by capturing. As we walk 4.5 release flows, capture.

    Selected quotes from The Checklist Manifesto

    Checklists supply a set of checks to ensure the stupid but critical stuff is not overlooked, and they supply another set of checks to ensure people talk and coordinate and accept responsibility while nonetheless being left the power to manage the nuances and unpredictabilities the best they know how.

    (More …)

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 3:15 pm on September 23, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    4.3 Retrospective Results 

    I missed posting the 4.3 post mortem recap before I went on vacation, so without further ado:

    We discussed the 4.3 release in Slack, where I asked for things that should be improved and things that went well, in order to get some feedback on how I did and helpful tips for future release leads (please find the Slack log here):

    Should be improved:

    • Figure out some ways to get more testing and more eyes on betas and RCs.
    • Not having feature plugin complete (with core patch) before the merge window.
    • The menu customizer proposal could have been written differently in anticipation of community perception.
    • The people who are able to test term splitting properly are very limited. Not sure how to wrangle people for this kind of specialized testing.
    • there seemed to be a lack of movement at the end of the cycle.
    • Features like site icon should be done as a feature plugin.
    • The merge proposal could have been proof-read by someone from the core team.
    • Getting dev-notes written up earlier.
    • There were also not a lot of feature plugins ready for core at the start of 4.3.
    • Don’t think it’s really okay to be relaxing standards in the name of forcing something to fit a deadline.
    • We did a freeze/RC maaaaybe 24 hours before release that had significant changes in it, that did not feel good.
    • We completely changed features after beta 1.
    • I think in 4.2 we discovered that have a core mentor involved much earlier also helped get it to that “ready” place. Or closer to ready.
    • Find a way to increase participation for bug scrubs.

    Went well:

    • passwords went really well.
    • We had a solid crop of guest committers that really made things go well for there project area.
    • Update to 4.3 went really smoothly over all as well.
    • We had some epic traction on Formatting component patches during this cycle. I’m a bit surprised how many tickets we closed with 4.3 because those are usually very problematic.
    • Touch and small screen usability improved significantly. Two of my top five issues were fixed outright and progress was made on a third.
    • I demoed the keyboard shortcuts in the editor to some people and they were like “DAMN, that’s amazing”.
    • i’m really happy about list table changes!
    • Shared taxonomy terms are dead.
    • WE RELEASED ON TIME!!!!

    I’m probably a little biased, but contrary to what the amount of bullet points in each section might suggest, I agree with @samuelsidler who said: “Almost everything went really smooth.” I’m proud of what we accomplished, and the download and update numbers speak for themselves. Thank you again for everyone who helped out during the release, let’s make 4.4 even better!

     
    • Sebastien SERRE 8:50 pm on September 23, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      WE RELEASED ON TIME!
      Did you had a train to catch?
      I prefered reading as in Debian’s Log, we’ll released when it will be ready than as WordPress is used on billion of websites…
      Note that ididn’t read your entire post as I just see that the most Important in WordPress is : RELEASING ON TIME ! WTF!

      • Helen Hou-Sandi 5:56 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The bullet points Konstantin listed above are all direct quotes from different people, which can be seen in the Slack meeting log linked above. There is no assignment of more or less value to any one item.

      • Bjørn Johansen 7:47 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Releasing on time is a testimonial of good project management.

    • FolioVision 12:40 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for the great summary Konstantin.

      Some issues on the receiving end: massive security issues in 4.3 release which caused emergency patching with 4.3.1 not to mention compromised sites.

      The most important part of your report for me is: “Don’t think it’s really okay to be relaxing standards in the name of forcing something to fit a deadline.”

      Amen. I’m with Sebastien.

      The release schedule is far too sharp. There should be half as many major releases per year if quality and security are not to suffer (small fixes can come more often in .x.x releases).

      • Helen Hou-Sandi 6:21 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I would note that security issues that are discovered or disclosed are not always or even typically introduced in the preceding major version, and 4.3.1’s three fixes were no exception. Certainly the timing was less than ideal and I can understand the perception, but let’s not spread misinformation please.

  • Weston Ruter 2:00 pm on September 23, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Outlining a possible roadmap for the Customizer 

    Planning for the future is a necessary and important part of the WordPress development process. As we consider the future of WordPress – both as a whole and individual features – we publish proposed roadmaps to encourage greater discussion and give insight into the core team’s thought process.

    The process of creating a roadmap is just as important as the vision behind it and the final roadmap itself. This process gives the entire community an opportunity to research and document history, define what specific items can be accomplished to bring us closer to the vision, and outlines how those tasks fit together within a possible timeframe.

    What follows is a potential roadmap for the Customize component. If you’re interested in the future of live preview in WordPress, now is the perfect time to get involved and leave your feedback.


    A couple of months ago, the WordPress lead developers met with the maintainers of the Customize component to discuss the future of live preview in WordPress. The goal of the chat was to come up with a potential roadmap for both the component and for how live preview can improve the user experience of WordPress for all users.

    The ultimate goal of live preview in WordPress is to create user trust and remove the “save and surprise” inherent in some of the backend features.

    After a lot of discussion, the group decided to target the following goals over the next two years:

    • Considerably improve performance.
    • Continue iterating on current live preview features to ensure they are solid and as easy-to-use as possible, including theme browsing and installation, menus, and widgets.
    • Experiment with new and different user interfaces. If we were creating live preview today, what would it look like? In what ways can we ease the feeling that you’re looking through a “porthole”?
    • Removal of the ambiguous mode. Currently, the Customizer is contained in a sidebar without the admin toolbar, but ideally there is the admin and the theme, and no in-between. One direction this may go is enabling “Customize” on the front end to immediately load the Customizer controls.
    • Experiment with a guided new user experience (NUX). Live preview lends itself to site setup. How can we improve the live preview experience and combine it with the NUX? Consider a “setup wizard” use case and ensure the flow has no dead ends, i.e. users can customize everything in one.

    Those overall goals for live preview in WordPress can be rewritten into some specific features that are in development or planned for the future of the Customize component. These include:

    • Transactions. This re-architecture of some of the Customizer internals improves compatibility with themes by loading the preview using a natural URL, and allows Ajax requests or even REST API requests to be previewed. It also allows the preview to be viewed independently of the Customizer, so changes can be shared for others to review. See #30937.
    • Selective refresh. Only a piece of the page will need to be refreshed when this backend feature is implemented. (Formerly known as “Partial Refresh”.) Currently, this is available for menus in the Customizer. This eliminates duplication of display between PHP and JS, keeping it DRY. See #27355.
    • Concurrency. Allows for “locking” settings using the Heartbeat API, improving the overall user experience by preventing users from overwriting each other’s changes. See #31436.
    • Revisions. Enables plugin developers to add features like draft, roll back, and scheduled changes (e.g. “change my background on January 1”). This builds upon transactions, as the setting changes are staged in a transaction, and this facilitates settings to be revisioned and for settings to be scheduled. See #28721, #31089.
    • Theme installation. Iterates on and completes the theme browsing experience.
    • Responsive preview. Iterates on the concept of live preview by giving users a better idea of what their site will look like on other devices. See #31195.
    • Bootstrapped Customizer. Lazy-load the Customizer into the current frontend view without having to leave the page. With selective refresh implemented, inline controls and frontend bootstrapping would be possible since full-page refreshes would no longer be required.
    • Improvements for both touch and small devices.

    Beyond those features, the group identified some specific changes that should be prioritized, in conjunction with the features planned:

    • The sliding animation between panels should feel more like “moving panels” (see: iOS).
    • Keyboard navigation should be consistent and clear.
    • Identify “dead ends” in the interface and remove them, when possible. For example, prior to menus in the Customizer, it was not possible to customize that aspect of your site’s design with the Customizer.

    The concepts surrounding live preview and the Customizer have been in development for a long time. Many of the concepts from Elastic Theme and the Visual CSS Editor have been incorporated over time. Over the next few years, experimentation with these concepts will likely take place in feature plugins. For example, this team may experiment with inline content editing, where it makes sense in the context of customizing a site. Another path for exploration is simple theme customization – e.g. change the header font, change the sidebar color, or change the width of the sidebar.

    As with all components and new features, we shouldn’t be afraid to experiment and fail and should continually push for new experiments and ideas, especially in the context of feature plugins. Further, some of the above experiments may not make it into core, but are meant as a general direction that live preview should take in WordPress.

    Taking these features together, below is a sequence outlining a possible roadmap for live preview and the Customize component in general, along with estimated targets. Please note that this is a proposed roadmap and is entirely dependent on contributor involvement. Additionally, many of these things will take place in a feature plugin prior to core inclusion.

    • Partial refresh. Performance Improvements. (Target: 4.4)
    • Responsive Preview. Transactions. (Target: 4.5)
    • Concurrency. Revisions. Theme Install. Beginning of NUX wizard. (Target: 4.6)
    • Focus on touch screen / small device improvements. (Target: 4.7)
    • Developer API improvements based on feedback from plugin developers. (Target: 4.8)
    • Improved UI after experiments in 2016. NUX “wizard mode.” (Target: 4.9)

    Live preview is one of the most critical features in WordPress as we continually combat “save and surprise.” The Customizer in its current form provides an improved user experience to WordPress users when customizing their site’s design. Each feature mentioned above is a continuation of the live preview concept, building and improving upon the Customizer.

    Everything above is just a proposal and we need your feedback to ensure it is the right direction. If you’re interested in any of the above, comment here with your feedback, or join the team in #core-customize.

    This post was a collaboration between @helen, @nacin, @mark, @celloexpressions, @samuelsidler, and yours truly.

     
    • Davide 'Folletto' Casali 4:46 pm on September 23, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      > NUX wizard

      I find a bit dangerous to think of it as a “wizard”, mostly because usually wizard UIs have specific connotations. We should think of it more as a “tutorial” like games do. Not separate UIs, but a guide through an existing UI that can be dismissed if you’re expert, or done partially, or followed all along. 🙂

      Other than that… this seems AWESOME. 🙂

      Performance is really the main thing there. That alone would reap huge benefits. Then you add Live Preview and well, boom! 🙂

    • Daniel Bachhuber 6:11 pm on September 23, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      We (Fusion) are very keen to adopt the Customizer as the UX for frontend management, and look forward to helping out with the feature plugins built as a part of the roadmap.

    • FolioVision 12:43 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Weston, thanks for the comprehensive and forward thinking report.

      It would be great if the interface paradigm for Customizer would remain constant for the exterior world (i.e. agencies and clients) while a dev version gets tested by the more progressive among us.

      Perhaps a switch to throw in settings to enable experimental Customizer features? The switch could be retired when Customizer settles a bit.

      • Weston Ruter 4:05 am on September 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        @FolioVision yes, absolutely. This is why most of the new features will be developed in feature plugins so that they will remain opt-in until they are deemed solid for everyone.

    • devolute 4:05 pm on September 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      but ideally there is the admin and the theme, and no in-between.

      Here here! Does this mean that there will be a “front-end” mode, and a “dashboard” mode that fits into the current dashboard so that things can be altered without a preview being available?

      • Weston Ruter 4:16 pm on September 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        @devolute Basically the idea is that there would no longer be a separate “Customizer” URL (wp-admin/customize.php) that you go into. When on any frontend URL, clicking “Customize” would just slide out the Customizer sidebar pane in place. You’d still have the admin bar available and everything else that you would normally when on the frontend, except you’d also be able to make changes to the Customizer as you browse around. So no, this doesn’t have in mind making the Customizer controls available in the wp-admin without a corresponding preview.

        • devolute 4:19 pm on September 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Ah, I understand your intention. I think my problem is that I’m using the customizer for things like phone numbers, addresses and other options when I perhaps should look at other solutions.

    • Ahmad Awais 3:38 pm on September 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      We at WPTie are slowly yet gradually adopting Customizer in all our themes and plugins (where needed). All in for customizer support in WordPress.

    • Alex Mangini 10:23 pm on September 28, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      On the “Bootstrapped Customizer” point, is this a move towards inline content editing and possibly even “page builder” type concepts?

      My biggest curiosity about the Customizer and what I really want to use it for as a developer is creating posts and pages without a 3rd party visual editor and without the drawback, as already stated, of guessing what they’ll look like after inputting content into specially built meta boxes or widgets.

      Thanks for doing these write-ups, as I build more and more WordPress plugins/products I find myself lurking around here to better educate myself and plan roadmaps for my own work.

      • Weston Ruter 10:45 pm on September 28, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        @alexmangini:

        On the “Bootstrapped Customizer” point, is this a move towards inline content editing and possibly even “page builder” type concepts?

        This is already possible, actually. For an example of inline editing, see the Customize Inline Editing plugin. And page builders are also possible now by using widgets in the Customizer. I’m currently working on a site that uses a concept of query-specific widget areas to allow every URL to have custom sidebars configured, where the main content area is just another widget area: this allows drag-and-drop building of pages just with standard widgets and any custom widgets that you define. Widgets still have a lot of room for improvement in Core, but I’m very keen to see them move in the direction of “content blocks” which can be used for building page templates in the Customizer.

    • Nick Halsey 4:19 am on September 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for getting this published Weston.

      A couple of additional comments on my end:

      • We need more help. The Customizer can do (and could do) a lot, but without more contributors (not just code), it’ll take time to see big improvements go through. I’d love to see more of an effort to embrace the Customizer throughout various other core projects, and to see more community involvement in Customizer design and development.
      • In the interest of experimentation and building on the benefits of live preview, I’m planning on looking at some ways to integrate things like page templates, post formats, and featured images (with cropping) into the Customizer. While there’s a good chance none of those things will make it into core, I’d like to encourage anyone with any ideas for the Customizer to try them out and offer them for discussion. We’re no where near the limit of what users could do with the Customizer and it’s an amazing framework to build additional features on top of.
      • While many of the topics in the post are fairly developer/backend oriented, it’s important to emphasize that there is still a significant amount of design and UI/UX work to be done, including looking at entirely different approached to the live preview UI concept. Don’t be shy to share your ideas if you have any – the technical side of things is evolving to support pretty much anything we may want to try.
    • pingram3541 3:59 am on November 24, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      A little late to the game but I just wanted to say thanks for pushing the Customizer forward. I do feel it is given the least amount of attention when it comes feature progression and I can’t figure out why. Yay for menu’s but how did menu’s make it on the plate before posts??? Seriously folks, this is a huge mechanism in which we are losing ground fast to many of the new front end content builders on the web and the Customizer is behind the times.

      @westonruter your example of the Customize Inline Editing is nice but seems only to serve a very narrow focus on ability as it still provides no capability of inline editing for actual post content/post meta. Don’t get me wrong, great working example but real world we need to break outside the box of wp_options, theme_mods…we need simpler access to post objects and other areas in WordPress.

      Again @westonruter looking at your code on the Customize Posts plugin I see that your way of getting around the lack of post object availability is by providing a drop down of all posts/pages of which to perform the query against which is genius. However, it doesn’t seem natural to have to select a page/post when you’re already viewing one in the Customizer already and when needed can navigate to other post/page where their post fields could be provided rather than choose it from a long drop down list, which could become unmanageable on some larger sites.

      So yes, I’m excited for the future and the BIG ONE thing I’d love to see is:

      Access to the current preview’s post object or at least a way to capture the post id for use with $customize_update and $customize_preview. Could be as simple as adding the post id to the $wp_customize object.

      • Weston Ruter 5:54 pm on November 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        @pingram3541 Thanks for the reply.

        I do feel it is given the least amount of attention when it comes feature progression and I can’t figure out why. Yay for menu’s but how did menu’s make it on the plate before posts???

        There are a limited number of people to contribute to each release. @carlhancock wishes that all admin management features could be added to the Customizer at one time instead of one piece at a time, but this is not practical for an open source volunteer effort with three releases a year. As we just saw with Automattic’s Calypso announcement from @matt, it took almost two years and dozens of contributors to re-develop the entire WordPress.com admin into a new JS-driven interface. We don’t have the time or the person power to do that. However, I think that interest is building, and with that, contributors will come.

        Compared to posts, it is relatively much simpler to build support for nav menus in the Customizer. They have a UI that fits in the Customizer pane, and the data model is pretty normalized. Posts, on the other hand, would need a full-on editor experience (inline to the preview) and can have an infinite number of variations to display (shortcodes, media embeds, etc). This is a hard problem to generalize for all themes, but it is something that @iseulde has worked hard on in the Front-end editor plugin. The Customize Posts plugin was developed as a prototype to show the architecture for how posts and postmeta can be managed in the Customizer so that the Front-end editor (or another such plugin) could leverage the Customizer for previewing and staging changes.

        your example of the Customize Inline Editing is nice but seems only to serve a very narrow focus on ability as it still provides no capability of inline editing for actual post content/post meta. Don’t get me wrong, great working example but real world we need to break outside the box of wp_options, theme_mods…we need simpler access to post objects and other areas in WordPress.

        As noted in the plugin’s description, Customize Inline Editing is an example (proof of concept), again to show how inline editing can be implemented in the Customizer. So its focus is intentionally narrow. The approach taken there can be implemented for managing post data inline. See also wp-customize-posts#8.

        on the Customize Posts plugin I see that your way of getting around the lack of post object availability is by providing a drop down of all posts/pages of which to perform the query against which is genius. However, it doesn’t seem natural to have to select a page/post when you’re already viewing one in the Customizer already and when needed can navigate to other post/page where their post fields could be provided rather than choose it from a long drop down list, which could become unmanageable on some larger sites.

        Actually, it’s not a dropdown of all posts/pages. It’s a list of the posts that currently appear in the preview. The dropdown’s options change as you navigate around the site in the preview, meaning that you should only be editing a post in the Customizer that is actually visible in the preview.

        So yes, I’m excited for the future and the BIG ONE thing I’d love to see is: Access to the current preview’s post object or at least a way to capture the post id for use with $customize_update and $customize_preview. Could be as simple as adding the post id to the $wp_customize object.

        The future is now. As noted above, Customize Posts does it to communicate the list of posts in the preview to the pane for the dropdown. Also @ericlewis has implemented this in wp-custom-css-per-post. I also have on my todo list to write a post on how to create a “metabox” in the Customizer for managing postmeta for the current singular post in the preview.

    • Philip Ingram 6:57 pm on November 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for the quick and detailed response. I’d love to contribute as long as my foo is strong enough, let me know how I can help or if there is a more appropriate forum for continuing this discussion =)

      Additionally, regarding @ericlewis ‘s wp-custom-css-per-post, I already have a working live css editor using codemirror to provide live updating of the preview as well as updating the hidden Customizer input setting transport to postMessage and this works great allowing live preview before saving but also allowing the saving. This has greatly improved efficiency of my front end design workflow. However this currently is limited to my site-wide custom css via theme options. What brought me here in the first place was seeking out a way to GET and POST the current posts meta which I have a custom css per post option built into my themes. So maybe I can get with @ericlewis and we can figure this out. Looking at WP Customize Posts I see the query for $_POST[‘customized’] to iterate though and retrieve post id’s but when using the Kirki toolset (I’m sure the class needs something extra for this) it’s always an empty array upon initial load of the Cusotmizer and that is where I’m stuck currently. I just need the darned post id!

      You mention that posts are way more complex than menus and yes there’s no debate there, however in the time being, if there was a simple way to capture the current previewed post’s id or maybe a clearer example how to retrieve it, that opens the door for us to pioneer further without waiting for a more core-driven method of updating post data via the Customizer.

    • Philip Ingram 10:20 pm on November 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      @westonruter Yes! Thank you for this.

  • Aaron Jorbin 4:04 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink
    Tags:   

    WordPress and PHP7 

    For the last few months, WordPress Core has been getting ready for the upcoming release of PHP7. PHP7 is bringing a host of improvements to PHP. One of the most notably is substantial performance improvements.Benchmarks of WordPress using PHP7 are showing a 2-3x speed improvement compared to PHP5.6.

    The first step towards support for PHP7 was to add PHP7 nightlies to the automated test matrix. For six months, WordPress has been testing every commit against PHP7. This helped us uncover a couple of now fixed issues.

    For example, PHP7 deprecates PHP4 style constructors. Therefore, WordPress Core removed them and also added a deprecation notice to all themes and plugins using them to extend core classes. This is done to help ensure that as many themes and plugins as possible are ready for PHP7.

    Next, WordPress Core fixed a small number of issues related to the Uniform Variable Syntax changes in PHP7.  Plugin and Theme authors are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with this change and all other backwards incompatible changes.

    PHP7 is currently targeted for release on November 12, 2015. Coincidentally, this is also the date that WordPress intends to officially fully support PHP7. 😃 While WordPress doesn’t officially support unreleased versions of PHP, you are encouraged to test and report any issues you find with PHP7 before the its official release.  PHP7 builds are available for Ubuntu 14.04 and CentOS 7 (and compatible distros) from php7.zend.com.

    Even as WordPress Core continues to expand its support for new versions of PHP, we have no intention of abandoning support for older versions until usage numbers show that the impact on users will be minimal. WordPress will continue to work with hosting providers to encourage them to upgrade their users to a current version of PHP and, when it’s reasonable, we will consider raising our minimum requirements. Regardless, WordPress continues to encourage all users to run the latest and greatest versions of PHP, including PHP7 upon its release.

     
    • Knut Sparhell 4:26 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “WordPress will continue to work with hosting providers to encourage them to upgrade their users to a current version of PHP”

      Is that strategy a success?

      Another strategy, like setting a date for a bump, may increase the speed of sites upgrading. The reason it’s slow is because of the current strategy. WordPress is i king that acts like a peasant in this game.

      • Gary Pendergast 4:44 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Is that strategy a success?

        So far, yes. We’re seeing ~1m sites upgrade per quarter from PHP 5.2 and 5.3 to later versions.

        Another strategy, like setting a date for a bump, may increase the speed of sites upgrading.

        This is unlikely to have much, if any, effect. We tried the same when upgrading from PHP 4 to PHP 5.2, and there were still far too many sites un-upgraded when we reached the deadline. (At the time, WordPress was ~15% of the internet – not as big as today, but still the biggest CMS by far.)

        If we do the same, and the numbers still aren’t low enough when the deadline arrives, our options are to bump the deadline (making the deadline meaningless), or to stick with it, and cause pain for millions of WordPress users. For me, at least, the latter is a totally unacceptable option.

        WordPress is i king that acts like a peasant in this game.

        The progress we’re seeing is through relationships we’ve cultivated with hosts, it hasn’t been made by throwing our weight around. I agree that hosts should be upgrading as soon as possible, but there’s no evidence to suggest that setting arbitrary deadlines will make it happen any sooner.

      • Aaron Jorbin 4:49 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        One thing everyone can do to help move these numbers is to talk to your local user group about why they need to care about the PHP version they run. Show them how they can upgrade, show them benchmarks of PHP 7 vs. earlier versions (especially vs 5.2).

        • Gary Pendergast 5:08 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Amen to that.

          The PHP 7 benchmarks consistently show massive performance improvements. Twice as many simultaneous connections handled, 30%+ reduction in page load times.

          With the research showing that slower page loading times increases page abandonment rate, you have a pretty simple and convincing argument for getting folks to upgrade: Not Upgrading Is Costing You Money.

          In the same way that WordPress has become so popular, the effort to get people to upgrade won’t be won by decree. It’ll be won by folks like you and I, like everyone who reads the make/core blogs, telling their friends and family to make sure they’ve upgraded.

        • rahul286 1:52 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          What about WordPress dashboard shows warning. Just warning. Like “Hey you are using old PHP version which is bad karma… WordPress will still work, but it can work better with new WordPress”. [read more | dismiss]

          “read more” will link to a page on wordpress.org where among other things we can show list of hosting companies who are running latest php version. 😉

          • Aaron Jorbin 3:33 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Most users don’t know what PHP is, let alone what version of PHP they are running or how they can update to a new version. A notice does little to help.

            • Samuel Wood (Otto) 12:10 am on September 11, 2015 Permalink

              A notice by itself is massively pointless to show the end user, who likely neither knows nor cares how their hosting service runs.

              However, it might be worth considering trying to detect the host in question, and providing valuable information for that specific host, such as links and other methods the end user can do to update themselves. Many hosts have a choice, somewhere, and if we know that, we can provide guidance.

          • Rafael Ehlers 6:30 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            We are starting to do that with MailPoet, to prepare our users for the upcoming version: https://support.mailpoet.com/knowledgebase/how-to-prepare-my-site-for-mailpoet-3-0/ and yes, we are using a notice inside our admin pages.

    • slickremix 5:26 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice! This is awesome! PHP 7 is going to be awesome! Hopefully hosting providers along with theme and plugin developers will go along with it and start encouraging people to make sure they are running the newest version for speed, security and reliability! Looks like we’ll be having to start testing our plugins for the newest version! WordPress should add this on the plugin and theme description pages. Show what version of PHP they have been tested up to.

      • Aaron Jorbin 6:10 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Please do test your themes and plugins. The more testing that takes place, the more happy users when they upgrade.

        • rahul286 1:53 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Is there any way or automated test? Many times when there are changes like this, wordpress.org sends email to plugin authors which might have compatibility issues.

    • Ahmad Awais 6:05 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Cool stuff. Tested WP base install on PHP7 Ubuntu 14.04 so far so good.

    • wiesson 7:09 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Where can I report “front-end” bugs? I’m having some issues with php7 RC1 and the wordpress backend.

    • Marko Heijnen 8:55 am on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “WordPress will continue to work with hosting providers to encourage them to upgrade their users to a current version of PHP”

      Can we finally have some proof on this? I have worked at one of the bigger host and I never saw someone from WordPress core contacting us.

      • Rafael Ehlers 6:33 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        ^ this!

      • Samuel Sidler 6:55 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I can’t speak to whether/when conversations occurred with “one of the bigger host[s]” that you worked at, but I can assure you that conversations are happening.

        Outside of the ~1 million sites upgraded per quarter that @pento mentioned above and the clear decline of PHP 5.2 usage on the stats page, what kind of “proof” are you looking for?

        • Marko Heijnen 7:22 pm on September 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          @samuelsidler: That doesn’t prove anything. That shows users and hosts are working on it. It doesn’t show that WordPress does something about it. Like I moved around 100-150k sites last year from PHP 5.2 to 5.5 which is something the host did.

          I worked at the biggest host in Europe. You would expect WordPress to talk with them. Also I never heard from my connections that WordPress was contacted them. Obviously it doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen but the changes are high it didn’t.

          So again, where is the proof?

          • Samuel Sidler 7:26 pm on September 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            @markoheijnen: As a representative of WordPress (component maintainer), I think it’s great that you worked for “the biggest host in Europe” and helped them migrate sites off of PHP 5.2. You are part of WordPress and you acted in the best interests of the project (and the host) to migrate sites. That’s the system working.

            I’d like to ask again: what kind of “proof” are you looking for?

            • Marko Heijnen 7:47 pm on September 13, 2015 Permalink

              I acted not in the name of WordPress but in the name of the host and their customers. Yes, I’m a part of WordPress but that doesn’t mean that all my actions can be linked to it.

              The proof I’m looking is that core members (Project Leaders/committers) are talking with hosts. As in what does it mean you are working with hosts? Just sending them a message that x users are still running PHP 5.2? are is WordPress in a more pro active role?

              One thing core could/should do is see which plugins will break when hosts move to PHP 5.5. We could build a mechanisme that would check the current version of the plugin on the versions. If we then work together with plugin authors in fixing things that would break, that would help hosts to migrate users easier. I have ideas how to do this which do involve rebuilding lot’s of WordPress infrastructure. Instead of bash scripts/cronjobs building up microservices. If wanted I can work things out before the community summit.

            • Samuel Sidler 5:15 pm on September 14, 2015 Permalink

              The proof I’m looking is that core members (Project Leaders/committers) are talking with hosts.

              @markoheijnen: Committers and project leads have stated that they are talking with hosts. It sounds like you don’t believe that and want further evidence. Is there specific evidence that will assuage you? Or does it just boil down to not trusting the statements of committers and project leads?

              That said, why are committers and project leads the only group who can communicate with others? Any member of the community can help – like you did at “the biggest host in Europe” – by contacting hosts or, if they work at a host, migrating to more-recent versions of PHP.

              If you’d like to build a tool that makes testing plugins easier, I am sure hosts and users alike would find it useful.

            • Marko Heijnen 5:31 pm on September 14, 2015 Permalink

              @samuelsidler: Yes, it comes down that I don’t trust the statement. It doesn’t match with the things I hear around me and from the talks last year at the community summit. And till now you didn’t came with any proof at all.

              I do find it interesting that in this case I’m part of the community but when it comes on working on making WordPress or translate.wordpress.org better, then you and the core team does everything to avoid me and to make me look bad.

            • Aaron Jorbin 6:10 pm on September 14, 2015 Permalink

              @samuelsidler @markoheijnen: This is straying fairly far from the topic of the post (The announcement of WordPress’s support for PHP7). The best place to discuss strategies to update the minimum supported version of PHP is in ticket #33381

      • keithpickett 1:05 pm on September 11, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        They can encourage them all they want. It’s just not going to happen IMHO. That’s mostly because hosting providers have to support other PHP apps/platforms like Joomla, Drupal, not to mention the countless EComm apps out there. The PHP version support is all over the place. As for developing in WP, it’s a nightmare. I work with Vagrant VVV locally and write plugins using some PHP libs (from Composer). VVV uses the latest PHP version, so the apps behave as expected. However, when I deploy on a hosting platform like Scala, for example, my app dies because they only support 5.3. I’m just trying not to pull all of my hair out.

        • Jon (Kenshino) 7:00 am on September 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          The more decent hosts have long realised that they need to have backwards compatibility and yet support the newer PHP versions.

          Good shared hosts nowadays allow users to select their PHP versions via cPanel.

          You can always educate your clients to

          1. Change hosts (I see it as my civic duty to get people to stop paying for bad hosts)
          2. Ask the host (or help them ask) to move their accounts to a higher PHP version server.
          3. Use the cPanel PHP version selector if available.

          Cheers!

        • Marko Heijnen 7:27 pm on September 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I get what you are saying. I have spoken out more that it isn’t only about WordPress, hosts and the users but also talking with other projects. Personally I would like to setup a task force to help out on a more pro active way to decrease the usage of old PHP versions.

    • Zach Tirrell 12:46 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      We know from the stats that are shared that ~12% of those running WordPress are on PHP 5.2, but I think this is not the metric that matters. What is more telling is the percentage of those running the latest version of WordPress are running PHP 5.2. Could that number be shared, so maybe we could all appreciate the challenge better?

      Also, what is the metric we are shooting for to decide to drop PHP 5.2? Is it based on the number requested above? Is it raw percentage? Is it total number of users? Are we expecting to see that get to zero?

      Considering that there continues to be security patches for older version of WordPress, why can’t hosting providers who stick with on older version of PHP also stick with the current version of WordPress?

      Given that support for PHP 5.2 has been dropped by PHP, more details on the future roadmap of WordPress on this topic is essential to developers being comfortable with this ecosystem.

      • J.D. Grimes 12:55 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        That is why #33381 was opened. But it hasn’t been addressed yet, unfortunately.

      • Aaron Jorbin 3:36 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I don’t have a specific number in mind, but I know I won’t be encouraging a move until it is in the low single digit percentages. I don’t know what other people have in mind.

        The numbers are fairly consistent across all versions of WordPress.

      • Omega Supreme 11:32 pm on October 14, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Interesting discussion…and I’m going to have to add a profile pic soon.

        My thoughts to your statement….it’s not so much the 5.2 issue, but users who haven’t updated WordPress in years. I’ve seen cases where once it was installed, that was it….5 years ago. So any changes to php will for sure break the site.

        Also in terms of dropping 5.2…I’ve come across other scripts where the designers just seem to want to stick with 5.2 or 5.3. Can’t tell you why since both of those are off the radar…but even suggesting 5.3 offends them which is sad since 5.6 is close to retirement as well.

    • simonrcodrington 3:38 pm on September 10, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Exciting times. Hopefully this will help move some of the hosting providers forward to more recent versions of PHP and we can finally get away from 5.2.

    • mulli.bahr 5:26 am on December 4, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is there a benchmark to show WP performance with the different PHP versions?

    • iamkingsleyf 4:04 pm on December 7, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would like to give this a try soon maybe next year with ubuntu 16

    • genesteinberg 2:51 pm on December 13, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I tested PHP 7 on a Plesk server (where you can easily set different PHP versions for different domains). While performance on a test WordPress blog seemed snappier, when I tried to login to the Dashboard, I got a blank screen. ??? It’s back to PHP 5.6.x till I sort this out.

      Peace,
      Gene

    • Kochi709 6:53 am on December 18, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi,
      I would like to know which version of PHP required to run WordPress 4.4 safely and without any error at shared hosting.

      Also I would like to know which version of PHP is used to code WordPress 4.4.

      Would appreciate for your reply.

      Thanks
      Kamrul

  • Boone Gorges 2:51 pm on September 4, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , , , ,   

    Taxonomy meeting summary – 2015/09/03 

    Present: @boonebgorges, @swissspidy, @masonjames, @drewapicture, @georgestephanis, @khromov, @srwells, @michaeltieso, @dpegasusm, @kraft, @mrahmadawais, @samuelsidler, @leatherface_416, @jblz, @tyxla, @jeroenvanwissen, @lindsaymac, @eric, @jbrinley, @brashrebel, @pdufour, @joehoyle, @timothybjacobs, @ryanduff, @krogsgard, @aaroncampbell, @rahe

    Logs: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/core/p1441310435002734

    • Had a general discussion about term meta: who’s used plugins for it, who’s used workarounds, various use cases. We talked a bit about some arguments against term meta: that it will not perform well at scale, that it encourages poor data modeling – but decided that they could be set aside for the most part.
    • Outlined the interpretation, including database table name and schema, function names, and other API additions to support term meta. @boonebgorges will work up a RFC for make/core for feedback.
    • Talked about various ways in which existing term meta libraries might conflict with the core implementation: duplicated function names, duplicate table names, incompatible table schemas, etc. @boonebgorges is assembling a list of plugins in the repo that may conflict with the core implementation. Once the outline of the core implementation is pretty much settled, @aaroncampbell, @krogsgard, @masonjames, and @boonebgorges (and anyone else who is interested) are going to collaborate on reviewing these plugins to see which ones will conflict in serious ways (via a Google Doc, which @boone will share once we’re ready to go). This will help us gauge the extent of potential problems, and get a sense of what outreach will look like.
    • We talked a little about combining the wp_terms and wp_term_taxonomy database tables #30262. We outlined some backward compatibility concerns, and strategies for minimizing conflicts. Put out a general call for thoughts and initial patches on the ticket, though we probably won’t move forward with schema changes for at least one more release cycle.
    • Had a very brief discussion about WP_Term #14162. Initial implementation – probably doable for 4.4 – will be simple, and will focus on strict typing for term data as well as cache invalidation. Future releases may see more functionality moved to the class.
     
  • Tammie Lister 2:51 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Introducing Twenty Sixteen 

    WordPress 4.4 will see a brand new default theme; that’s right, today is time to meet Twenty Sixteen! The process of selecting the Twenty Sixteen theme was a long one, taking several months. Lots of themes were considered, eventually settling on the one you see below. It’s a perfect fit!

    00.twentysixteen

    Twenty Sixteen features a new, never-released design that has some really unique touches on a traditional blog layout. It adapts well to different devices and is a joy to use.

    Twenty Sixteen is a modernised approach of an ever-popular layout — a horizontal masthead and an optional right sidebar that works well with both blogs and websites. It has custom color options that allow you to make your own Twenty Sixteen. The theme was designed on a harmonious fluid grid with a mobile first approach. This means it looks great on any device.
    @iamtakashi

    Let’s take a look at more!

    We have the pleasure of welcoming back Takashi Irie as the designer of Twenty Sixteen. This year, the core team developing our new default theme will be myself and @iamtakashi — and you! We hope you can join us in getting Twenty Sixteen out to the world. Along with us, @iandstewart and @samuelsidler will be making sure the ship stays on course and giving us their wisdom as we charter the default theme seas.

    How can you get involved?

    There will be weekly meetings every Monday and Friday 16:00 UTC in #core-themes for half an hour. These weekly meetings will start once the theme has initially landed in core. If you are interested in contributing, subscribe to this blog (if you haven’t already), and leave your name in the comments. Once we’re ready, we will give everyone a ping and we’ll let you know on this blog too.

    Want to know more about default themes?

    There are some great links where you can find out more about past default themes.

    The road to releasing a new default theme is long, but we’re already well on our way! The next step is to commit the initial code to core. From there, we will begin testing and patching. We hope you join in the adventure of releasing Twenty Sixteen.

     
    • Nikhil Vimal 2:54 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would be interested in helping!

    • Frankie Jarrett 2:57 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Pretty 🙂

    • Drew Jaynes 3:05 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Congrats all around!

    • Ciprian 3:11 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I still think it looks a bit outdated. The default themes should be more modern, more 2016ish.

      • Mattias Tengblad 3:38 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        +1

      • Paal Joachim Romdahl 4:55 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Agreed.

      • Arnan de Gans 6:21 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Yep, this looks like a 1998 html page 🙁

      • WTech 6:29 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        +2 (imho 2014 is better)

      • Matt Mullenweg 11:52 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        For the folks who think it looks old, definitely share some links to themes you think are more modern, it could be a good inspiration for twenty-seventeen (which is just around the corner).

        • waltson 5:37 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Hi Matt .Really thanks for giving a chance to interact with you .I like wordpress, and i am working on it from few months .I like the 2016 theme. But please see the below points

          (1)Could you please add some more functions that assist in working with forms.

          (2)Captcha support by default

          (3)Could you please add some more permalink structure tags like %taxonomy%,%sub-taxonomy%,%sub-category% and way to arrange them

          (4) great pain is trying to make WP work with Angular.js or similar for building web apps.

          The most important ting is that please give some importance to https://wordpress.org/ideas/view/latest , because we only have this place to express our ideas . It would be very happy if we get correct reply and concentration from the wordpress team .

          I am looking forward to your reply.

          Thank you .

          • Paal Joachim Romdahl 8:12 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Hi Waltson. A better place to post what you wrote would be in the “WordPress 4.4: What’s on your wishlist?” thread further down this page.

            • Sam wc 9:08 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink

              But Paal , these are some good ideas .Why we waiting for implement this in WordPress 4.4 . If these ideas make sense and it is important it can be implemented int he very next WordPress update.

            • Aparna123 9:25 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink

              Waltson is right

            • Sam wc 3:04 pm on August 27, 2015 Permalink

              WordPress team not looking at Frame work such as laravel,Yii,cakephp etc.Please make it very powerful such as this frame work. Because we love wordpress never wan’t to down when compare with these frameworks .

          • Aparna123 9:23 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Good things Waltson.Generally there is lack of form handling and validating function in WordPress.Captcha is also important .

        • Adrian Pop 1:08 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I also think is kind of an oldish design – forget about sidebars! I really like Satellite (https://wordpress.org/themes/satellite/) and Ryu (https://wordpress.org/themes/ryu/) is one of my all-time favorite – Thaks Mr. Takashi 🙂

        • Sam wc 3:03 pm on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          WordPress team not looking at Framework such as laravel,Yii,cakephp etc.Please make it very powerful such as this frame work. Because we love wordpress never wan’t to down when compare with these frameworks .

        • transl8or 5:11 pm on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I don’t think it looks old.
          It’s very very classical, kinda puristic und could be quite elegant with good pictures.

          Nevertheless I have two concerns about this theme:

          • The Frame; especially when it’s black, the site could somehow look like a newspaper obiatury.

          So I hope the customizer options will support a checkbox or simular to switch the frame on or off.
          Or maybe even have it only left & right vs. top & bottom.
          Or just choose the frame color individually so that it will be the same as the background color.

          • The Primary Menu; especially in the desktop version.

          I’m often very unhappy with lot’s of menus within WordPress Themes because they seldom look kinda “design consitent” for the whole site nor for bigger websites with lots of pages (not blogs, with mainly posts and infinite scroll).
          The later comes mostly with horizontal menu.

          — —

          As a suggestion for this theme, I could imagine a “sidebar integrated” menu, like you can see it in the Ascetic theme see here:
          http://demo.alienwp.com/ascetica/
          Could be a challenge with a full-width page, or pages with full-width header-image though.

          Or a menu like the Materialist Theme uses, see here:
          https://wordpress.org/themes/materialist/
          But on the upper right side.

          I like simplicity of the menu in the Libre Theme and the Theme in general;
          but it still has the issue of going “white over white, or even over content” when you create a site with a menu that has loads of items and levels.

          — — —

          Talking about the Materialist Theme brings me to the next topic.

          A more modern design approach for Twenty Seventeen?!?

          How about Material Design, Semi Flat Design, more colorful options and/or a “lighter, thinner, more playful & transparent look” for the menu/navigation, input-form elements and fonts.
          Oh, and I’d like to see an option in the Customizer for the primary menu to either be a “fixed navigation bar” or not more often.

          Examples:

          http://www.nuabikes.com/

          http://www.brindisatapaskitchens.com/

          http://revelator.com/

          http://www.wonderfullywild.co.uk/

          https://niice.co/

          http://branding.cards/

          http://simplehonestwork.com/

          http://evandorlot.com/portfolio/naaataa-fashion-branding/

          Google Resources on “Material Design”:

          https://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html

          🙂

        • sonofara 2:46 am on August 28, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          20Sixteen is clean, responsive and is definitely a perfect startup template which can be transformed into an eye catching website.

        • wimfeijen 8:49 pm on October 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Hi Matt,

          To me 2016 looks stylish, elegant and indeed a bit old-fashioned.

          Our customers especially like Big Point. For example see: http://ttcmobile.com/ . In our designs we like to look at websites like uber.com , airbnb.com and always apple.com . Meaning big pictures, clear menu, big header text explaining what the site is about and clear call to action button.

          Good luck in creating another awesome theme!

        • hussong 8:40 am on December 9, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Chiming in a bit late here, I’d like to point out that twenty-sixteen looks a lot like the Cutline Theme from ten years ago (which I loved at the time): http://cutline.tubetorial.com/

          That being said, I’m really excited about 4.4 and what’s happening under the hood there (srcset in particular) and want to say thanks so much for keeping WordPress awesome!

      • chrishoward 5:50 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Yes. Reminds me of 2012.

        I think the main prob is the sidebar. That sort of stuff is all in footers in modern designs.

        • chrishoward 5:51 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I meant, reminds me of TwentyTwelve theme

        • WisTex 2:25 am on November 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          The sidebar is optional, but needed for certain types of websites, especially those with a large amount of interconnected content.

          You can get away without having a sidebar on a sales website, and websites that don’t have a lot of content, but navigation becomes a nightmare once you have hundreds or thousands of pages of content to navigate.

          If you are trying to direct people to a specific call to action, a website with no sidebars is better since it creates a flow. If you want your website to be sticky and people to stick around for hours, then properly used sidebars help tempt them into viewing more content.

      • stuk 3:22 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        +1

    • Lara Littlefield 3:16 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m so excited to have photos displayed in such a unique way like this in a default WordPress theme. 2016 is beautiful!!

    • Helen Hou-Sandi 3:18 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Woohoo! I’ve still got that musician bias – like Twenty Fifteen, this looks like it can serve as a really solid base for portfolio sites, especially with some creative thinking around colors and content.

    • web2033 3:23 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Happy new 2016 ^_^

    • Mel Choyce 3:24 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      <3

    • Matthew 3:26 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      awesome stuff

    • Philip Arthur Moore 3:27 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Happy to help do some theme breaking. Can’t wait to see this land. Takashi’s designs…are they ever not amazing? Another hit; cannot wait to see this on millions of sites. Great work gang.

    • Ihor Vorotnov 3:35 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      One more blog theme with a font that looks ok only with latin characters? Looks nice, but… Come on guys, there’s life outside US. There are other languages out there. WordPress is not only for blogs anymore.

    • Ajay 3:40 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is definitely looking very clean. Twenty Fifteen was OK look wise, but this definitely looks like a worthy base for any new site.

    • Nick Halsey 3:48 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m honestly not a fan based on the screenshots, but that’s okay – even a default theme shouldn’t try to satisfy everyone. Something feels off with it for me.

      Based on the way the colors seem to work, again based on the screenshots, we should probably explore making the text colors auto-generate to light or dark based on the selected background color, for simplicity and to minimize contrast issues. The Fourteen Colors plugin for Twenty Fourteen does something similar.

    • Chrisdc1 3:51 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks good, I’d be interested in helping as well,

    • Ahmad Awais 4:02 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’d love to contribute.

    • Sakin Shrestha 4:03 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks really nice and clean. Would love to contribute… Thanks

    • Donna Fontenot 4:18 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is exactly what WordPress does NOT need. Another boring, snoozefest old-school blog layout. Wake me when WP joins the rest of the world in 2015 and beyond. (BTW, I tried really hard to come up with a nice way to say that, and I just couldn’t, so here is the comment in all its straight-forwardness.)

    • MRWweb 4:25 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Let’s get some alt text in that image gallery! #a11y

      There are some really nice touches in the screenshots. I like the pull quote a lot (though wonder how it will be applied with the editor).

      At some point, I’d love to hear the core team be a little clearer on how the new theme is selected and why there have been two blog themes in a row. (It also might not be too late to add an interesting static front page option to Twenty Sixteen to make it more versatile!) I tend to follow this stuff and had no clue this process was happening. I certainly understand the need for fewer cooks in the kitchen, but at least letting some more people suggest ideas for priorities might be nice. Maybe even a poll or two.

      I’ve heard for years now many people clamoring for a “new Twenty Twelve” and still hope to see another “CMS” theme as a default soon. (It’s remained quite popular: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1UV4UGFCdTdNhK8v7l9s6J0uI5Y-QMRocSET63NO3CVc/edit?usp=sharing)

      • Nick Halsey 7:11 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        You’re not missing anything – there is a complete lack of transparency in the default theme process prior to the “announcement” posts. Even frequent contributors have heard absolutely nothing about it prior to today.

        My biggest complaint is that we have now had the same designer do the last three default themes. Takashi’s work is amazing, but it’s definitely time to give someone else an opportunity to fill this role as has been done in the past. Since the extremely outside-the-box Twenty Thirteen, we’ve gone back to progressively less and less compelling designs with each default theme.

        • MRWweb 8:59 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          > Takashi’s work is amazing, but it’s definitely time to give someone else an opportunity to fill this role as has been done in the past.

          I agree. Even if Twenty Fifteen—which I like quite a bit—were by the objectively best designer in the world (that is not a thing, but for the sake of argument…) the core team should be doing more to promote and diversify the designers who show what WordPress can do and be. The idea that there aren’t other designs who can do this—and wouldn’t drop all sorts of other commitments if given the chance!—just doesn’t make sense.

          I hate being negative in what is an otherwise worthwhile celebratory post and call-to-action, but I really hope this can stop being so untransparent and homogenous.

      • wimfeijen 8:55 pm on October 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        +1 Nicely put! TwentySeventeen should be the new Twenty Twelve!

    • Felix Arntz 4:26 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Plain and simple – and great. Looking forward to replace Twenty Fifteen on my blog 🙂

    • Emil Uzelac 4:30 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      So Fresh, So Clean!

    • Nilambar Sharma 4:31 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Simple and nice. I am willing to contribute… 🙂

    • voldemortensen 4:48 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is there a way to get involved with this *before* it lands in core? I am a frequent core contributor and I have Slack open all day. I’ve heard nothing about this until literally a few minutes ago.

    • Shapeshifter 3 5:12 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “The theme was designed on a harmonious fluid grid with a mobile first approach. This means it looks great on any device.”
      @iamtakashi

      I like the concept !

      Is there any way to download the current alpha version of this, so I can upload it to my own website to preview it with my own personal content?

      I’m interested to know what the current Theme Customizer currently offers in Content (width) and Layout options.

    • Orangedrop 5:16 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      For once purely based on screens I don’t know if I’m down this ! That said you can’t please everybody all of the time 🙂 I would love to get my grubby mitts on it and break it a few times so please count me in ! Thanks guys and as always keep up the awesome work.

    • Brent Jett 5:39 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’d like to know more about how this theme will be implemented in terms of customizer fields, editor styles, custom widgets/shortcodes etc… I’m a big believer in designing themes for the WP user as much as the reader. Where are these discussions currently being had? Is this project on github somewhere?

    • dannybrown 5:54 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yawn. Sorry, but this design (as far as looks goes) is so 2012.

    • dshanske 6:15 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would be interested in ensuring that the theme is microformats compliant.

    • Gaurav Tiwari 6:20 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Make it look like commercial themes. If WP is no longer blogging focused CMS why should the default themes be?

    • LittleBigThings 6:36 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Cool and clean, a bit Twenty Twelve-like. Hope to see some unique features in the Customizer. I would love to follow it up and help out testing.

    • Tomas Mackevicius 6:41 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! Can we see live demo?

    • Karthikeyan KC 6:44 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      To be honest, twentyfourteen looks better than twentysixteen. Anyways, it’s good for the default one. 🙂

    • Tomas Mackevicius 6:52 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      But 2014 was not built on _s, I hope 2016 is.

    • WebMan Design | Oliver Juhas 7:07 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great, very clean! I’d like to contribute too 🙂

    • SanjayaBhai 7:10 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Twenty sixteen.. Hope it will be great…. But please make this themes more modern/Beautiful … It’s seems classic .

    • Alex Mills (Viper007Bond) 7:25 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It’s been a long time since I’ve run a default theme but I’ll be switching for this one!

    • George Stephanis 7:28 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m pulling for twentyseventeen to be Kubrick redone responsively. 🙂

      • Ryan Hellyer 9:42 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’ve been toying with forking Kubrick like that for many years now, but never gotten around to it.

      • Drew Jaynes 8:41 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        FWIW, I already did it. I created a child theme for Twenty Twelve called Nubrick, that created a responsive version of Kubrick. The header used CSS gradients and everything else was matched to a tee with some obvious improvements. Might have it laying around here somewhere, have to look.

    • Tarik Cayir 7:59 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      That’s sweet and incredible!

    • Morten Rand-Hendriksen 8:14 pm on August 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sign me up. I’ve done a lot of work with pull-images of the kind proposed here and know some of the pitfalls. I’ll contribute what I can and where it helps.

    • Valeriu Tihai 12:14 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Happy to help

    • WP Sites - Brad Dalton 1:37 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      How about a widgetized page template which can be used as the front page. Widgets in columns are popular and so are full width sections. The genesis sample child theme is hugely popular because you can easily add custom functionality unlike any of the default themes.

    • Matt (Thomas) Miklic 2:03 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is a beautiful theme and I can’t wait to use it myself.

    • Aaron Brazell 2:13 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I like the image offset a lot and I want a one-column option, so glad to see that in there. Agree with previous commenters saying it looks a bit dated, but I also don’t think that’s twntysixteen per se… I think the “blog layout”, which is a guiding principal, is a bit dated. I’d love to see twentyseventeen place less emphasis on text content, top down, left-right, sidebar, header and more of a focus on rich media. Photographs, videos, etc… with natural integrations (no external APIs) with social content (and not just FB and Twitter)… it’s such a rich internet, but the blog approach to the project might be influencing the frontend a bit much and not keeping up. 🙂

    • nick6352683 2:38 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Anything, and I mean anything would be better than 2013, 2014, and 2015. I prefer 2012 over those, and 2016 seems more or less in line with 2012. The whole discussion is pretty much mute for me, as I always opt to use “premium” type themes, with tons of bells and whistles, but I’m very biased as I develop my own themes, with extra functions and shortcodes.

    • webdevmattcrom 3:33 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Definitely interested in contributing, sign me up!

      I love that this does feel like it’s heading back toward a cleaner Twenty Twelve feeling. I like that the sidebar is on the right by default, but especially considering RTL it would be nice to have a Customizer option to put the sidebar on either side. In that vein, since the Customizer is getting more and more prominence it would be great to see this theme really flaunt some great aspects of the Customizer as a strong example of “Decisions not Options” while still providing flexibility in look and feel.

      Looking forward to seeing this come to life.

    • Amit Kvint 6:32 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Definitely interested in contributing, sign me up too!

    • Brian Krogsgard 7:12 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is Ian Stewart the default theme lead?

      There is obviously a lot of decision making going on in regard to default theme design that nobody really knows about, and it is really confusing. It is so different than the rest of WordPress development.

      So, how would someone go about getting involved earlier in the process (at the design level!), short of going to Matt Mullenweg? I might add that going to Matt on how to get involved (though he appears the primary gatekeeper on default theme design) is likely quite intimidating for most folks.

      A lot of talented designers would probably like to get involved in this process but don’t know it’s possible or how to start. Some information and light on the process itself would be most welcome, I’m sure.

    • Philip Arthur Moore 8:55 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The fact that there are so many passionate responses here is pretty cool.

      History time:

      Default themes won’t be for everyone, and ultimately I share Brian’s thoughts above. I think it’d be GREAT for 10000% transparency around the default theme making, designing, and proposal stages before posts like this are made. (Honestly it makes no difference to me personally but the community seems to benefit quite well from feeling like we have a chance to contribute to such a public and front-facing piece of WordPress.)

      But that aside, however the theme came to be, I think the first drafts shared are quite nice and absolutely cannot wait to help break things once it lands into Core. I’ve no doubt that there are some pretty serious design and development challenges that will come out of these drafts, and it’s going to be exciting to take part in that.

    • Subharanjan 9:04 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Clean and Simple !! Looks awesome 🙂

    • Fotis 9:20 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Perfect.

    • Ryan Hellyer 9:46 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I like this new design. Simple, yet elegant.

    • stuk 10:24 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      To me it seems quite outdated and useless as any default theme, is it not?
      Quite clear that their intention is not to add extra features to WordPress, and indeed the basic theme can support only a maximum basic options.

      But also simply bad design. If it’s the preview we let people install with the system, so it seems bad.
      Nothing to do with new design trends.
      Despite the WordPress developers insist that the system is already more than a blogging system infrastructure, they continue to release static templates without AJAX and without REST, and yet the basic theme is a theme of a blog, not a website.

      In one word: shame.

    • David Bennett 11:42 am on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It reminds me of Linen from TheThemeFoundry, and it has the open, airy look of themes from ElmaStudio. I like it. The only thing I wonder about are the horizontal dividers in the sidebar. The Daily Dish theme from StudioPress has black sidebar dividers overpower the theme somewhat. The dividers in The Daily Dish are thicker but if a blogger has a lot of widgets it can start to look like the i Ching.

    • Elisa 12:19 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I like it 🙂

    • CYBERsprout 1:28 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! A very modern design.

    • ldbaldwin 2:43 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would be interested in contributing on some leve, (testing, documentation, etc.). Thanks!

    • cramdesign 2:47 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think it looks great. The structure is a traditional setup but I think that the overall design, typography and image handling is very current. I agree that the dividers in the sidebar might be a little too heavy but, then again, that is easily changed with css and let’s be bold every now and again.

    • firewatch 3:34 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m interested in contributing, thanks!

    • djsteveb 9:20 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wish all the like and dislike comments could be removed here. Give specifics or save the screen space.

      Sorry ya’ll but the default theme does not need to be any one person’s idea of pretty or modern, it’s default and certainly not the only option for anyone running wp.

      What the default themes have been lacking since 2012(?) is documentation, transparency, and support.

      All that fancy responsiveness is fine if you like things as is. Simply trying to move the left sidebar to the right with 2015 is a nightmare – I miss the days of simply change float left to float right.

      Yes I know, “modern design” is beyond that – I have learned how to move things around with bootstrap, and foundation… moving things with 2014 / 15 is a joke. No documentation, no support – no transparency with updates.

      Either given backend option for the most common changes, or make it easier for people to change things with code. Having to make edits and then change screen sizes and search for ways to change rules for each media query is a joke, with no docs, and no warnings about updates.

      Given that the default theme is the only thing we can count on that will get any kind of support from buddypress, rtmedia and other plugins – many are indeed stuck with the default theme base – pretty or not – those things can be adjusted if the options are understood, documented, supported.

      My comment on takshi’s site still waiting moderation (August 25, 2015 at 12:37 am ) – maybe it’s akismet limbo. Support on the wp repo is total confusion – even other professional sites that created right sidebar child theme break with basic background color change – is it them? Is it the theme? Was it working then an update fixed something and broke others?

      I am happy to contribute what I can (20% through my php course!) – I was planning to make a video tutorial from the text how-to for making themes at themeshaper.com – however it states it’s outdated. I stumbled across a trello that has documentation for theming in the works – but that may be finished in 2017?

      Given that the default theme has total power over so many things WP – I prefer no java, nothing complex, basic – make it easy to mod it so people can make it prettier and modern on their own. Not left in limbo choosing no support, no docs with wp plugins that work (and look basic) – or get a theme that looks better is modifiable – but then does not work with plugins and gets no love or support from plugin systems.

      Frankly the older default themes were much easier to make better. Anything default that is complex is just going to shrink the amount of WP users that can actually mod something on their own without a degree in javascript and php. You might as well force us to use sass and less and bower. Really shrink the amount of people that can enhance a basic default theme.

      Maybe pull all the extra stuff out and make it an option plugin like some do with “jetpack features” – I just want BP to work with something that can be modded – either with lots of backend theme options (colors, sidebar on, sidebar off, move to footer – basic stuff really, or easy css that the average person can figure out or get basic support from the community to figure out. (please take out all third party bloat, eg- google fonts, gravatar, emoji and put them as optional plugins, pretty please!)

      Or convince BP and rtmedia (and others) to work with / provide support themes based on bootstrap and or foundation – then the default theme can be whatever it wants to be and we can peruse the documentation for those frameworks, and make adjustments easily.

      Sorry to long rant, (and I started with ‘save the screen space – seriously sorry, very frustrated with all this!) I want to see WP, and things associated with it continue to succeed, however I concur that many of the past two years’ not-so-transparent decisions have not made this easy for most of the average users IMHO.

      • rahul286 5:40 pm on August 28, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I am from rtMedia team.

        I like your idea of themes using a base js/css framework like bootstrap and or foundation. But our reason for supporting default themes is they work nicely with BuddyPress as well as other plugins. Mainly because many plugin developers also check test plugins with default themes.

        That being said, our inability to support most themes is mainly because most themes are not tested with BuddyPress. In fact wordpress.org only shows 28 themes that claim to support BuddyPress – https://wordpress.org/themes/tags/buddypress/ and 1 of them is default theme and 1 other (rtPanel) is our theme.

        • djsteveb 9:52 am on August 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          @rahul286 – Thank you for chiming in on this issue. I don’t expect your team or any other to have the ability to support every edge case theme created for wp, and I am glad you guys at least make an effort to keep rtmedia working with whatever updates get pushed by automattic at least. Your media plugin is the only reliable way for buddypress users to get picture and other media uploads, so it’s continuing functionality is imperative.

          It is sad there are so few themes tagged to work with BP – of course there are many that do work with bp and yet they are not tagged that way in the repo – and there are several that are available outside the wp org system – however my experience has been that we can not count on other themes to work with bp and rtmedia properly no matter where they are from. I have tried 24 of those you mentioned 😉

          This is exactly why I feel a new default theme must be carefully considered, and it should be easier to modify than the past two – as we are indeed basically stuck using 2014 / 2015 /2016 for bp sites or gamble with lots of things not working – and no support or docs to fix things. This is not an rtmedia fault – it’s just where things have gone with bp in general I guess.

          There are some who think my thoughts on this are 100% wrong, at least one person replying to a similar comment I made in regards to these issues at wp-tavern – ( http://wptavern.com/first-look-at-the-twenty-sixteen-default-wordpress-theme#comment-72326 ) – however I think people have not seen the amount of support that has been needed to keep self hosted wordpress sites with plugins working properly with major updates and the basic issues that revolve around the default theme, and those that vary from it, is the starting point for almost every issue bp / rtmedia and many others plugins breaking with users sites.

    • Marcus Tibesar 11:26 pm on August 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      IMO there is too much white horizontal space between the gravatars and the content.

    • Marcus 9:44 am on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would love to help out

    • weblizar 11:38 am on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi,Like to contribute.

    • abe_charles 12:43 pm on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Have to say that Twenty Sixteen default theme is very weak. It deserves to be placed on life support because it looks like something created in 2010. It’s plain black and white by default with options for different colour options but still quite stale.

      I thought Twenty Fifteen was poor but looking at Twenty Sixteen it’s as if WordPress is taking two steps backward by presenting this piece of crap. You have a disgruntled blogger in me and this theme ain’t gonna fly. At least you have a few more months before the year 2016 so get back to the drawing board and change the direction of this theme. It’s too late for April Fools.

      Repeal, repeal and stop making the images fall off the page. That’s frustrating. Come with a better theme.

    • Mel Choyce 8:22 pm on August 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think it’s important for people to remember that this theme was made by a real, live person. Disparaging contributors and their work is inappropriate and not welcome in this community.

      You are welcome to your opinion, but if you want to give feedback, please keep that feedback respectful and constructive. Critiquing the design and the default theme building process is fine. Calling this theme “crap” or “useless,” however, is not constructive feedback and not appropriate for these contributor blogs. As Matt Miklic mentioned, that kind of feedback is abusive and unhelpful.

      Here’s how to structure good design feedback:

      • Empathize. Remember that behind every design is a person. If you wouldn’t say it to this person’s face, don’t say it here.
      • Start with “I think…” and finish with “because…”
      • Comment on particular elements that don’t work in the design, like the typography, colors, hierarchy, and composition. Try to be as specific as possible.
      • Stick to goal-oriented feedback: “This theme can become a better default theme for more users if it did [x], [y], and [z].”
      • Frame feedback as suggestions, not mandates. “What if you…” and “How about if you tried…” are great ways to present alternate ideas to a designer.

      Thanks for helping us keep WordPress a positive place to contribute.

    • abe_charles 12:44 pm on August 28, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Apologies for the insensitive remark. I never meant to cause offense, I thought that the opinion was valid but it went too far. It’s just that I have been waiting for Twenty Sixteen theme for a few months and to see what it will look like or what it looks like I am disappointed. It does need work for real. It’s too plain and looks like not much thought was put into it. It’s rather plain and basic. I was expecting Twenty Fourteen 2.0 or Twenty Fifteen 4.0

    • modparlor 2:01 pm on August 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Neat. Looking forward to this new minimalist theme. One request though: Could you please add in a font-switcher into the customizer. A thing desperately lacking in the 2015 theme IMHO. I can add in my own fonts, I know, but a dropdown with a set of 30+ Googlefonts would be easyer for quick tryouts.

      That aside, thanks for the neat themes and the ongoing work on WP.

    • Ihor Vorotnov 3:36 pm on September 4, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hey, if I’m correct, the theme meeting is going to start soon today. Can anyone point me where it will be? Can’t find the Slack channel.

    • danielgarneau 9:53 pm on October 20, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m looking forward to work with Twenty-Sixteen as soon as it becomes available. I am using Twenty-Ten because its interface is what it is, very plain and simple, somewhat along the line of Twenty-Sixteen’s.

      What got me searching for a new theme was the performance issue with my current site identified through Google Developers PageSpeed Insights ( https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/ ).

      I am hoping that Twenty-Sixteen will continue to provide the kind of plain interface found in Twenty-Ten while at the same time being natively built to support today’s mobile devices as well as laptops tabletops.

      My Twenty-Ten theme is using the JetPack’s Mobile Theme Module, which does a fair job at providing some degree of mobile access to my site. But it would be nice to be able to use a Theme that would not be dependent on any plug-in for such basic functions as mobile compatibility.

      So I am very interested in following-up on the progress being made towards Twenty-Sixteen, and am looking forward to start experimenting with it.

      • Knut Sparhell 1:10 am on October 21, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Twenty Sixteen has been available for a long time already. By using a responsive theme no “mobile theme” is necessary.

    • Joseph Graham 9:27 pm on October 25, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      beautiful Theme 2016

    • sinan isler 10:23 pm on October 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      what f is this? are we in 1995 ?

      • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 10:58 pm on October 26, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’m sorry you don’t like the new default theme. Your tone is not one that encourages progress, however. You should attempt to at least explain why you dislike the theme, preferably in a constructive and polite manner. Swearing (even self edited) is rarely polite.

        • sinan isler 12:03 am on October 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I’m sorry for being angry. But I have reasons.

          It is to late now for feedback. already shipped beta 1. we cant make major change on this. I see this late thats why I’m angry if I could see this earlier I could give feedback and try to make REALLY MODERN look and MINIMALİST styles.

          But too late for this changes.

          There is no solution on this design. Only typographic approaches.

          I will tell one thing.
          You can not make good design with only good typography. We need to make solutions for multiple purposes.

          Another thing. Why we are talking this to in core section. This title should be on https://make.wordpress.org/design/

          • sinan isler 12:10 am on October 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            Friday 16:00 UTC in #core-themes
            I will try to be there.

          • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 12:51 am on October 27, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            While you have reasons to be frustrated, that’s never an excuse to forget you’re working with people who have put a great deal of time and effort into something.

            The default theme is never going to be a theme that pleases everyone and that’s okay 🙂 It’s a theme people can use for their site or not, they can learn to code from or not, they can learn typography from or not. The default theme is not the be-all and end-all of themes. It’s a default theme that demonstrates some of the things you can do with WordPress.

            But above all, it’s okay if you don’t like it. You don’t have to use it. Next year there will be another one. Maybe that one will be more towards your liking. Personally I never liked TwentyFourteen, it just wasn’t my kind of theme, but I saw the effort that went into it and appreciated it. And that’s allowed. It’s just the default theme, though, and like Hello Dolly, is not something you must use 🙂

            • titush 9:02 am on October 27, 2015 Permalink

              +100 completely agree. The amount of time spent by all users commenting on the default theme… wow… imagine they would have spent it on hunting down bugs…

            • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 11:28 pm on October 28, 2015 Permalink

              @titush – In all fairness, not everyone who complains has the technical ability to hunt down and fix bugs. And that’s okay too 🙂 Sometimes noting a problem clearly for the developers is the best someone can do, and that is an invaluable service for software. However the approach is also important.

    • Joseph Graham 9:13 pm on November 1, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      deleted

      • John Blackbourn 1:06 am on November 2, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If you’re not going to provide constructive feedback, please don’t bother commenting. This sort of comment will not be tolerated.

    • karthikkk 2:27 pm on November 2, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Super theme. I particularly like the current themes that are directly putting more focus on content. That is the best way to design a theme.

    • iksa01 11:04 am on November 12, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I am not adding any value , but I am curious, can schema markup support be added ? in the final version ?

    • WisTex 2:33 am on November 29, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I really like the design. Simple, clean, and something that could easily be enhanced by some child themes, if developers so wish.

    • mohlimo 11:52 pm on December 1, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! A very modern and simple design.

    • texxs 3:05 am on December 2, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for making this theme, I’m sure it help drive sales to more web designers like me. I now that your theme development team has lots of talent and make some pretty impressive stuff that I couldn’t compete with so I appreciate you not doing that.

    • madivad 1:46 am on December 8, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I like how the photo falls out of the main content line, I assume asides and quotes possibly do too.

      But what I’ve never understood is why the main content has never (in any theme I’ve seen) flowed/wrapped around the sidebar. As the page scrolls down and the sidebar is gone, there is all this wasted space.

    • DoubleOhDave 7:52 pm on December 9, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love it but the gravatar image is tiny! Is there a way to increase the size?

  • Konstantin Obenland 5:20 pm on July 7, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Dev Chat Agenda for July 8 

    Here’s the agenda for tomorrow’s Dev Chat in the #core channel on Slack.

    Time/Date: July 8 2015 20:00 UTC:

    1. Beta Notes
    2. Feature Updates
      1. Admin UI – @helen
      2. Menu Customizer – @westonruter
      3. Passwords – @markjaquith
      4. Site Icon – @obenland
    3. Feature Plugin Chat Next Week@samuelsidler
    4. Component Updates
    5. Open Floor

    Feature Leads: Let’s review last weeks goals and set new ones for next week.

     
  • Daniel Bachhuber 7:46 pm on June 29, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Shortcake (Shortcode UI) chat summary – June 29th, 2015 

    Present: @danielbachhuber, @samuelsidler, @matth_eu

    • Sam shared with us the possibility of getting Shortcake committed to WordPress core. While he can’t make any guarantees, this is the direction he suggested:

      • Better first-run experience with the plugin so people can evaluate it better. He recommends adding a few “example” shortcodes, and mention that they’re examples / not to be included in core. Pull quote and PDF could be a good start.
      • Decide on the appropriate UX for inserting new shortcodes. The experience is currently tucked away under “Add Media”. We’ve been exploring a “Add Post Element” button alongside “Add Media”, or dedicated buttons in the editor for some post elements.
      • Inline editing would be really nice. We should see if we can make it the default experience for most shortcodes, and all existing core shortcodes. We should also experiment with content blocks, and see what other editors are doing.
    • Matt lost his internet, so we didn’t talk about any code things.

    Logs: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/feature-shortcode/p1435604506000006

    Next chat: same time and place

    Next release: v0.5.0 – Tuesday, August 4th

     
    • webdevmattcrom 5:56 pm on July 3, 2015 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love the idea of adding a “Add Post Element” button. While I’m not a fan of adding more clutter to the editor in general, the current Shortcake experience is anything but intuitive for the average end-user. We build plugins that utilize shortcodes and that is the only thing that has kept us from using Shortcake to date.

  • Daniel Bachhuber 8:27 pm on June 22, 2015 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Shortcake (Shortcode UI) chat summary – June 22nd, 2015 

    Present: @danielbachhuber, @goldenapples, @davisshaver

    Logs: https://wordpress.slack.com/archives/feature-shortcode/p1434999676000006

    Next chat: same time and place

     
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