Progressive Web @ WCUS Contributor’s Day

From whatwebcando.today you can get a sense of the large number of rich web APIs that are standard today. This is often referred to as the Progressive Web Platform. With these capabilities, alongside the use of modern development workflows and coding and performance best practices, web developers can create great user-first experiences on the web.  Similarly, the WordPress platform has also been evolving steadily since its inception, and most recently, sweeping changes are being introduced with the development of Gutenberg.

An important part of the continued evolution of WordPress is the integration of modern Web Platform capabilities into core when possible, and into plugins and themes as well. We have been working on a project aimed at integrating the Service Workers API (#36995) and Web App Manifests (#43328) into WordPress core, as well as expanding core support for HTTPS (#28521). Right now this effort is been advanced under the umbrella of a PWA feature plugin.

Up until now this feature plugin has primarily been collaboration between XWP and the Chrome team at Google. The plugin is a technology preview for a core foundation that themes and plugins can use to create new user experiences, like being able to access a site while offline. Service workers will also make it possible to do offline editing in Gutenberg. To be successful, the project needs the participation of the WordPress core community and wider ecosystem. We have been delaying the feature-as-plugin proposal until after Gutenberg launches, but now that WordPress 5.0 is around the corner, we want to start the formal feature-as-plugin process.

We will be at the WCUS Contributor Day in Nashville next week, and we want to discuss the current status of the PWA feature plugin and a roadmap for the work ahead. If you are interested in learning more about this proposal and possibly contribute to the project, we would love to chat.

#progressive, #pwa, #service-workers, #wcus

New Features and Enhancements with Customizer Changesets in 4.9

In WordPress 4.7 the concept of changesets was introduced in the Customizer (#30937). To understand the new Customizer improvements in 4.9, you must first go back and review what was proposed and implemented a year ago:

Customize Changesets Technical Design Decisions

Changesets are a way to persistently store changes made via the Customizer framework. Changesets contain the pending changes for any number of settings, and a setting can model any object in WordPress‚ÄĒwhether options, theme mods, nav menu items, widgets, or even posts/pages and their postmeta. Changesets are identified by UUID (which is the post_name¬†for the¬†customize_changeset¬†post type that stores the data as JSON in post_content). When a request is made to WordPress with the customize_changeset_uuid¬†request param‚ÄĒwhether to the frontend or to the REST API‚ÄĒthe Customizer framework will bootstrap and all of the values from the changeset will be read and applied to the response via WordPress filters added by the settings‚Äô respective¬†WP_Customize_Setting::preview()¬†methods.

Only an authorized user can write changes into a changeset for a given setting (according to its respective capability). But once it has been written then anyone can preview the site with the changes in the changeset applied: all that is needed is the UUID. Since previewing a changeset is now a readonly operation (whereas before 4.7 it was always a POST request), a changeset can be previewed on a site by authenticated and unauthenticated users alike. With the changeset UUID supplied when opening the Customizer, a user can keep iterating on a set of changes over several days or longer and only publish them once stakeholders are satisfied. Now, freelancers and agencies will be better able to communicate and collaborate on site changes with clients.

Once a customize_changeset¬†post transitions to the publish¬†status then all of the values in the changeset will be passed into their respective WP_Customize_Setting::update()¬†methods to publish (‚Äúgo live‚ÄĚ) on the site: in version control terminology, the staged values from the changeset get committed and pushed. All of the changes go live together in a batch save operation (originally changesets were termed ‚Äútransactions‚ÄĚ).

As noted in the 4.7 merge proposal:

For the initial core merge, no UI changes are being proposed. The feature will only be exposed as the new query parameter on the URL. Adding a UI to this feature will happen in a future release.

The future [release] is now. Where the infrastructure of changesets was merged from the Customize Changesets feature plugin in 4.7, the key UI features from the plugin are now being merged in 4.9 after a significant number of design iterations.

This dev note contains sections on the following:

Continue reading ‚Üí

#4-9, #customize, #dev-notes

Improvements to the Customize JS API in 4.9

There are many user-facing Customizer improvements in 4.9, including: drafting/scheduling of changesets, autosave revisions, changeset post locking, frontend public previews, a new experience for browsing and installing themes, updated nav menu creation UX, and the code editing improvements for the Custom HTML widget and Additional CSS. But in addition to all of these, there are also many improvements for developers which will make extending the Customizer much more pleasant.

Something important to remember about the Customizer is that it is a single page application that is powered by JavaScript. Many developers may only interact with the PHP API for registering controls, settings, sections, panels, and partials. But controls, sections, and panels do not need to be registered in PHP at all. The PHP API for registration is essentially a wrapper for the underlying JS API. When you load the Customizer all of the params for the PHP-registered constructs are exported to the client for the JavaScript API to instantiate and initially add to the UI, but this JS API can dynamically instantiate additional constructs at any time thereafter in a Customizer session. This is how new widgets, nav menus, and nav menu items are added without requiring the entire Customizer to reload. You can also avoid statically registering settings and partials in PHP by instead adding filters to dynamically recognize settings and partials, allowing them to be registered on demand. All of this allows the Customizer application to scale out to be able to customize and preview an unlimited number of things on a site (e.g. any post or page with their postmeta in the Customize Posts feature plugin). The point here is that in order for the Customizer to scale, the JavaScript API must be used directly. So this is why the Customizer JS API improvements in 4.9 are important as they fix many longstanding annoyances and shortcomings with the JS API.

This dev note contains the following sections:

Continue reading ‚Üí

#4-9, #customize, #dev-notes

Widget Improvements in WordPress 4.9

On the heels of adding TinyMCE rich editing to the Text widget and the media widgets in 4.8, there are another round of improvements coming to the Text widget and Video widget in 4.9, among other improvements to widgets.

Shortcodes in Text Widget

One very longstanding request‚ÄĒfor over 8 years‚ÄĒhas been to support shortcodes in the Text widget (#10457). This is finally implemented in WordPress 4.9. It is no longer required to have plugins and themes do add_filter( 'widget_text', 'do_shortcode' ). Core now will¬†do_shortcode()¬†at the widget_text_content¬†filter (added in 4.8) in the same way it is applied in¬†the_content¬†at priority 11, after wpautop()¬†and shortcode_unautop(). If a plugin has added do_shortcode()¬†to widget_text¬†then this filter will be suspended while the widget runs to prevent shortcodes from being applied twice. If a Text widget is in legacy mode¬†then it will manually do_shortcode()¬†as well.

One reason for the long delay with adding shortcode support in Text widgets was due to many shortcodes looking for a global $post¬†when they run. Since the global $post¬†varies depending on whatever the main query is, the shortcodes in a Text widget could render wildly different on different templates of a site. The solution worked out was to temporarily nullify the global $post¬†before doing the shortcodes so that they will consistently have the same global state, with this global $post then restored after the shortcodes are done. So if you have shortcodes that depend on a global $post‚ÄĒor call get_post()‚ÄĒthen you should make sure that they short-circuit when $post¬†is null¬†in order for them to behave properly if used in the Text widget.

As of [42185] this nullification of $post is only done for archive (non-singular) queries; for singular queries, the $post will instead be set to be the current main queried post via get_queried_object(). This ensures that the global $post is consistent and explicit. This setting of the $post global while applying filters (and shortcodes) is also now implemented for the Custom HTML widget. Additionally, to ensure that gallery shortcodes that lack ids do not end up listing out every attachment in the media library, a shortcode_atts_gallery filter has been added which makes sure the shortcode’s id attribute is set to -1 when the widget is rendered on archive templates. This allows you to embed the gallery for any currently queried post in the sidebar. You should make sure such a Text widget is not displayed on an archive template by either adding it exclusively to a sidebar that appears on singular templates, or by using a feature like Jetpack’s Widget Visibility to hide the widget on non-singular templates.

Media in Text Widget

One reason why shortcode support in the Text widget was needed in this release is because 4.9 also allows media to be embedded in the Text widget (#40854). There is now the same ‚ÄúAdd Media‚ÄĚ button in the rich Text widget as on the post editor, allowing you to add images, galleries, videos, audio, and other media. To support these, core also needed to support shortcodes like caption,¬†audio,¬†video, and gallery. Note there are also dedicated widgets (Image, Audio, Video, and¬†Gallery) for these media types as well.

Having separate media-specific widgets helps with discovery and allows us to provide streamlined interfaces for each media type. For example, the Image widget now has a field specifically for supplying the link URL (see #41274), and the Video widget now provides more guidance to users when supplying external URLs (#42039). The media-specific widgets are closely aligned with blocks in Gutenberg; the existence of media inside the Text widget will align with eventual nested blocks in Gutenberg, and would be treated as Classic Text blocks in any future migration from widgets to blocks.

Embeds in Text Widget and Video Widget

One shortcode not mentioned above is embed. This one was more difficult to support because oEmbeds have not been supported anywhere other than post content. This was because there were dependencies on having a post as context for the sake of caching, as the responses to oEmbed requests get stored in postmeta. However, as of #34115 if there is no post as context the oEmbeds will now get cached in an oembed_cache custom post type instead. Since a Text widget will explicitly nullify the global $post while shortcodes are processed, this means oEmbeds will get cached in this custom post type. Similarly to how do_shortcode() now applies in the widget_text_content filter like it applies on the_content, so too now WP_Embed::autoembed() and WP_Embed::run_shortcode() both also now run on widget_text_content.

In WordPress 4.8 the Video widget was introduced with support for displaying an uploaded video file, a YouTube video, or a video from Vimeo. Each of these were displayed using MediaElement.js. Just as oEmbeds are now able to be displayed in the Text widget, so too now the Video widget has been expanded to support any oEmbed provider for video. See #42039.

Theme Styling Changes

As with the previously-introduced media widgets (#32417) and the new Gallery widget (#41914), some themes will need to be updated to ensure the proper styling is applied to media and embeds that appear in the widget area context, since previously they would only appear in post content. Please follow #42203 and #41969 for style changes that are made to the core bundled themes, as you may need to make similar changes to your themes.

Improved Theme Switching

A longstanding difficulty with widgets has been where they end up when switching from one theme to another. With #39693 this experience is improved in 4.9 by having logic that is able to better map widgets between the themes’ widget areas. As noted by @obenland in [41555], there are three levels of mapping:

  1. If both themes have only one sidebar, they gets mapped.
  2. If both themes have sidebars with the same slug (e.g. sidebar-1), they get mapped.
  3. Sidebars that (even partially) match slugs from a similar kind of sidebar will get mapped.¬†For example, if one theme as a widget area called ‚ÄúPrimary‚ÄĚ and another theme has ‚ÄúMain‚ÄĚ then the widgets will be mapped between these widget areas. Similarly, widgets would get mapped from ‚ÄúBottom‚ÄĚ to ‚ÄúFooter‚ÄĚ.

The names for the widget areas used for the mapping groups were obtained by gathering statistics from all the themes on WordPress.org.

Widget Saved State on Admin Screen

With #23120 there is now an indication for whether or not changes to a given widget has been saved on the widgets admin screen. (Widgets in the Customizer already had a saved state by virtue of being registered as regular settings.) When first opening a widget, the button will say ‚ÄúSaved‚ÄĚ and appear disabled. Once a change is made to the widget (e.g. a change¬†event triggered), then the button will become enabled and say ‚ÄúSave‚ÄĚ. If you try leaving the admin screen at this point, an ‚ÄúAre you sure?‚ÄĚ message will appear alerting that if you leave your changes will be lost. If you cancel, then the first widget with unsaved changes will be scrolled into view, expanded, and focused. Upon hitting ‚ÄúSave‚ÄĚ the spinner will appear and then upon a successful save it will switch to ‚ÄúSaved‚ÄĚ and become disabled. The ‚ÄúClose‚ÄĚ link has been changed to ‚ÄúDone‚ÄĚ and it only appears when the changes have been saved. Note that the HTML5¬†checkValidity¬†method will now be called on the widget form prior to attempting to submit, and submitting will be blocked if it returns false. If you have JavaScript-based fields in the widget, make sure that you trigger change¬†events whenever changes are written into any hidden inputs; this was already a requirement for widgets in the Customizer.

Related Tickets

  • #10457: Parse shortcodes in text widgets by default
  • #23120: There should be indication that widget settings have been saved
  • #34115: oEmbed not working on author page without posts
  • #38017: Add widget instance to remaining widget argument filters
  • #39693: Fix missing assignment of widgets on theme switch
  • #40442: Widgets: Rename ‚ÄúCustom Menu‚ÄĚ widget to ‚ÄúMenu‚ÄĚ
  • #40854: Allow media to be embedded in Text widget
  • #41274: Improve discoverability of link URL in Image widget.
  • #41610: Widgets: Change ‚Äúclose‚ÄĚ to ‚Äúdone?‚ÄĚ
  • #41914: Widgets: Add gallery widget
  • #41969: Ensure Gallery widget is styled properly across widget areas in bundled themes
  • #42039: Widgets: Enable oEmbed support for Video widget
  • #42203: Ensure media & embeds in Text widget are styled properly across widget areas in bundled themes

See full list of tickets in the Widgets component with the 4.9 milestone.

#4-9, #dev-notes, #feature-oembed, #media, #media-widgets, #widgets

Code Editing Improvements in WordPress 4.9

The themes outlined for WordPress 4.9 are ‚Äúediting code, managing plugins and themes, a user-centric way to customize a site, and polishing some recently added features over this last year.‚ÄĚ Within the themes of editing code and polishing recent features, we‚Äôre improving the code editing functionality in the Customizer‚Äôs Additional CSS¬†feature, the Custom HTML widget, and the Plugin and Theme file editors. We included these improvements to code editing among the¬†4.9 goals¬†and this release is packed with them.

CodeMirror: Syntax Highlighting, Linting, and Auto-completion

The most visible and drastic improvement to code editing in 4.9 is that there is now an actual code editing control rather than just a textarea input. If you‚Äôve been using WordPress for a long time (over 8 years), this may sound like d√©j√† vu. Syntax highlighting for the theme and plugin editors was originally introduced in WordPress 2.8 (#9173) but it was removed shortly after in¬†2.8.1 due to browser compatibility problems with the ‚ÄúCodePress‚ÄĚ library (no relation to WordPress). So in the 8 years since the feature was re-proposed in #12423, after considering a slew of code editor libraries, we decided on incorporating CodeMirror:

CodeMirror is a versatile text editor implemented in JavaScript for the browser. It is specialized for editing code, and comes with a number of language modes and add-ons that implement more advanced editing functionality. ¶ A rich programming API and a CSS theming system are available for customizing CodeMirror to fit your application, and extending it with new functionality.

You have probably already used this CodeMirror library a lot online, since it powers the editors in many familiar products and services including Brackets.io, Bitbucket, Chrome’s DevTools, Codepen, Firefox Developer Tools, GitHub, and JSFiddle, among many others. In the WordPress world specifically CodeMirror is also very familiar. Jetpack switched from ACE to CodeMirror in 2013 for its Custom CSS module, and there are close to 100 search results for CodeMirror on the plugin directory. Many of them should be updated to re-use CodeMirror as bundled with core as well. See below for some details on how to do that.

The syntax highlighting abilities of CodeMirror can help authors catch many mistakes visually while writing code, as the color coding can quickly clue in that something isn’t right. In addition to color coding, WordPress also enables by default the add-ons which will auto-close brackets and tags, and then also highlight matching braces and tags which have already been written.

CodeMirror also supports linting to actually add explicit error checking beyond just stylistic helps. WordPress is initially bundling the following linters: CSSLint, JSHint, HTMLHint, and JSONLint. See #41873 for adding a PHP linter as well, though as described below, the theme and plugin editors have a more robust means of checking for PHP errors by running the code on the server itself. The linters will report either errors or warnings with your code:

When a linter finds an error in your code (CSS, HTML, JS, or JSON) the code editor in WordPress will prompt you to fix the error before allowing you to proceed with saving. The nature of this error notice varies by whether the code editor is in Custom CSS control, Custom HTML widget, or the file editor.

Another feature of CodeMirror which reduces mistakes is auto-completion (or hinting). As you start typing out a CSS property, JavaScript DOM object, or HTML tag, an autocomplete dropdown will appear which you can use your keyboard to select an option:

 

There is still room for improvement with auto-completion (see #42213), but the feature does help suggest possibilities when you generally have an idea of what you’re wanting to enter.

Theme and Language Modes

For the CodeMirror library now bundled in core, we decided to not include any of the alternate themes, so the default theme is used with some styles added to bring it in line with core. Additionally we also did not include all of the language modes, as many would be very unlikely to be relevant in the WordPress context (e.g. Fortran). The WordPress-relevant modes we are including with the core bundle are: clike, css, diff, htmlmixed, http, javascript, jsx, markdown, gfm, nginx, php, sass, shell, sql, xml, and yaml. If a plugin wants to use a mode that is not bundled with core, they may bundle and enqueue the mode script separately (e.g. fortran.js); a plugin may also bundle and enqueue a custom theme if desired.

Accessibility and User Preference

One of the biggest challenges when exploring the incorporation of a code editor library into WordPress was the concerns raised regarding accessibility. For users of screen readers, a plain textarea is just going to be easier to navigate and use. CodeMirror does have an inputStyle option which:

Selects the way CodeMirror handles input and focus. The core library defines the "textarea" and "contenteditable" input models. On mobile browsers, the default is "contenteditable". On desktop browsers, the default is "textarea". Support for IME and screen readers is better in the "contenteditable" model. The intention is to make it the default on modern desktop browsers in the future.

The code editor in WordPress goes ahead and explicitly defines contenteditable as being the default for both desktop and mobile due to better accessibility. Nevertheless, since there are still accessibility concerns we decided to not yet integrate CodeMirror in the post editor’s Text tab; as CodeMirror is enabled by default it could impede users of screen readers from performing the primary writing workflow upon upgrading to 4.9. Additionally, it doesn’t make sense to work on integrating CodeMirror in the post editor since it is being heavily revamped right now in Gutenberg; we should instead focus on integrating CodeMirror into Gutenberg itself.

Lastly, if a user still does not want the CodeMirror library to be used when they edit code then there is now a user preference to turn it off. It is available on one‚Äôs user profile and it is called ‚ÄúSyntax Highlighting‚ÄĚ. Again, it is enabled by default:

Additional CSS Integration

When the Additional CSS feature was introduced in 4.7, it used a plain textarea to edit the CSS code in the Customizer. For several years prior, Jetpack had already featured a Custom CSS module but it allowed CSS to be edited via a CodeMirror editor on an Edit CSS admin screen. After 4.7 was released, Jetpack was updated to use Additional CSS in the Customizer instead, but enhanced it with the CodeMirror editor it had used on its Edit CSS admin screen. So now in WordPress 4.9, core is following suit and integrating CodeMirror into the Additional CSS feature as well (#38707), and there’s now an issue for Jetpack to newly re-use CodeMirror as bundled in core.

One key improvement from the initial implementation of Additional CSS is in regards to the detection of syntax errors. In 4.7 the error detection logic merely checked to make sure that the number of braces, brackets, and parentheses were balanced. This was not ideal because there were false positives when a balancing character was present in a comment (e.g. #39198). The goal was to eventually harden validation of CSS syntax validity by utilizing a tokenizer/parser (#39218). Instead of having to implement this logic in PHP, however, we now rely on client-side logic via CodeMirror and CSSLint to check for CSS errors and the unreliable server-side validation has been removed.

Code Editor Customizer Control

As when the Additional CSS feature was first introduced as being extensible, the updates feature new extensibility as well. When the feature was under development in 4.7 we debated whether or not to add a reusable code editor control for the Customizer. At that time we decided to opt for a regular textarea control with some enhancements since there wasn’t enough unique about the code editor to justify a separate control at that time. With the availability of CodeMirror, however, there is now justification for a reusable code editor Customizer control (#41897). This control is what is used to power the Additional CSS editor.

The code editor control may be registered in PHP via instantiating the WP_Customize_Code_Editor_Control class as can be seen in core. It allows you to pass a code_type param to indicate the file type being edited. Alternatively, an editor_settings array param may be passed which is the same format the new wp_enqueue_code_editor() function accepts (described below).

As with any Customizer control, the code editor control may also be added dynamically with just JavaScript. One example of this can be seen in the Customize Posts CSS plugin. Another example would be to add a second code editor control for Additional CSS to show up in the Colors section of the Customizer:

wp.customize.control.add( new wp.customize.CodeEditorControl( 'custom_colors', {
	section: 'colors',
	priority: 100,
	label: 'Custom CSS',
	editor_settings: {
		codemirror: {
			mode: 'css'
		}
	},
	setting: 'custom_css[' + wp.customize.settings.theme.stylesheet + ']'
} ) );

The code editor control registered for Additional CSS can itself also be extended. Either the registered custom_css control can be swapped out for a subclass of wp.customize.CodeEditorControl in JS (as seen in Jetpack PR), or the existing control can be modified at runtime. For example, in keeping with 4.7’s Custom SCSS Demo plugin, here is how you can dynamically change the Additional CSS control to use SCSS instead of plain CSS:

wp.customize.control( 'custom_css', function( control ) {

	/*
	 * CodeMirror gets initialized once the control's containing
	 * section is expanded. Note that if the Syntax Highlighting
	 * user preference is disabled, then the deferred will be
	 * rejected.
	 */
	control.deferred.codemirror.done( function() {
		var scssOptions = {
			mode: 'text/x-scss',
			lint: false, // CSSLint doesn't like SCSS.
			// The lint-marker gutter is automatically
			// toggled when lint option changes. 
		}
		_.each( scssOptions, function( value, option ) {
			control.editor.codemirror.setOption( option, value );
		} );
	} );
} );

And similarly, here is how you can change the default from CSS to SCSS via PHP:

add_action( 'customize_register', function( $wp_customize ) {
	$control = $wp_customize->get_control( 'custom_css' );
	if ( $control instanceof WP_Customize_Code_Editor_Control ) {
		$options = array();
		if ( isset( $control->editor_settings['codemirror'] ) ) {
			$options = isset( $control->editor_settings['codemirror'] );
		}
		$control->editor_settings['codemirror'] = array_merge(
			$options,
			array(
				'mode' => 'text/x-scss',
				'lint' => false,
				'gutters' => array(),
			)
		);
	}
}, 11 );

Custom HTML Widget Improvements

In WordPress 4.8.1 a dedicated Custom HTML widget was introduced in order to take over the role the Text widget had for adding arbitrary markup to sidebars, as the Text widget in 4.8 featured the TinyMCE visual editor. This new Custom HTML widget was introduced as essentially a clone of the old Text widget, aside from the absence of the ‚Äúautomatically add paragraphs‚ÄĚ checkbox. Well now in WordPress 4.9 the Custom HTML widget comes into its own as it also now incorporates CodeMirror to provide users with syntax highlighting, auto-completion, and error checking. As with the Additional CSS feature, if you make a coding error in the Custom HTML widget, you will be blocked from saving until you fix the error. This guards against a misplaced div¬†tag from breaking your site‚Äôs entire layout.

On multisite installs or any site on which an admin user lacks the unfiltered_html capability, there are restrictions for what HTML a user can provide in post content, Text widgets, and Custom HTML widgets alike. In 4.8.1 we resorted to listing out some common tags that would be illegal when a user cannot do unfiltered_html. With CodeMirror, however, this is greatly improved due to its integration with HTMLHint and because it is extensible to allow custom rules to be added. There is now a custom kses rule for HTMLHint (htmlhint-kses.js) which checks HTML for any tags or attributes that are not returned by wp_kses_allowed_html( 'post' ). This means that we don’t need to tell users what they can’t do if they have no intention of doing it in the first place, and HTMLHint provides contextual inline error reporting when they do provide something invalid. Plus, since saving is blocked when there are errors, a user’s illegal HTML will not be silently stripped from them when they attempt to save (as wp_kses_post() is still applied on the content when saving on the server).

The CodeMirror component in the Custom HTML widget is integrated in a similar way to TinyMCE being integrated into the Text widget, adopting the same approach for integrating dynamic JavaScript-initialized fields. See custom-html-widgets.js which exports a wp.customHtmlWidgets object to JS.

Just as CodeMirror has been integrated into the Custom HTML widget, once 4.9 is released a logical next step would then be to integrate CodeMirror into Gutenberg’s Custom HTML block, as per PR comment. Similarly, once CodeMirror is available in core it can then be explored for use in Gutenberg’s Text view (see issue).

Theme and Plugin File Editors

Now, about those theme and plugin editors. The file editor in WordPress has been the subject of much debate and skepticism over the years. This may be also why hasn‚Äôt received a lot of love in terms of improvements. For reasons why the file editor is still a valuable part of WordPress in its mission to democratize publishing, please see @melchoyce‚Äės post ‚ÄúFrom No Code to Pro Code‚ÄĚ. She goes on to outline a few ways that the file editor can be improved and in WordPress 4.9 almost all of them have been implemented and beyond.

Nevertheless, when a user first visits the theme or plugin editor, they will be presented with the new warnings as follows:

Notice how the theme editor has a link directing a user to the Additional CSS feature in the Customizer. It is the hope that CodeMirror will be primarily used in Additional CSS and the Custom HTML widget, but for users who do need to make theme and plugin changes the editors have been vastly improved.

The file editors now also feature the same CodeMirror-powered syntax highlighting, auto-completion, and error checking. The allowed file extensions in the file editors can edit have been expanded to include formats which CodeMirror has modes for: conf, css, diff, patch, html, htm, http, js, json, jsx, less, md, php, phtml, php3, php4, php5, php7, phps, scss, sass, sh, bash, sql, svg, xml, yml, yaml, txt. In addition to increasing the number of editable file types, the file editors also now allow you to edit files deeper than two directories deep. And now given that the file list can be much longer than before, the files and their directories are now presented in an scrollable expandable tree like most editors provide:

When editing CSS, JS, HTML, and JSON files there is the same error checking powered by client side linters. As with Additional CSS and the Custom HTML widget, if a linter detects an error it will display an error and block you from saving the change. Here there is also a way for a user to override the error to proceed with saving anyway:

When editing PHP files, however, client-side linting is not enough (though it would be a nice enhancement, see #41873). If attempting to call an undefined function this will not be a syntax error, but it will cause a fatal error and whitescreen your site. The plugin editor did previously have some basic safeguards for this by temporarily deactivating the plugin and then re-activating it in a sandbox to check for fatal errors, though it was not very reliable (see #39766). And even when it was able to check for errors, a fatal error would result in the plugin being deactivated, a plugin which could be critical to a site to function properly. For themes on the other hand, there was no such ability to temporarily deactivate the theme and do a sandboxed check for fatal errors since a theme cannot be deactivated like a plugin can.

Ultimately what was worked out in #21622 was a new sandboxed method for making PHP file changes in both plugins and themes. When attempting to save a PHP file edit for a plugin or theme, during the user‚Äôs save request WordPress will write the file to disk after first copying the old file‚Äôs contents into a variable. Then immediately after writing the change it will do a loopback request back to the file editor screen with the user‚Äôs same cookies to check to see if the PHP file edit would lock them out of the editor. If that loopback request generates a PHP fatal error, then the original PHP file is restored. Otherwise, if there is no fatal error then WordPress will open another loopback request to the homepage of the site to check if there is a fatal error generated there. If so, again, the PHP file edit is undone with the old version of the file restored. At that point, an error message is shown to the user informing them of what specifically the error was and prompting them to fix it. The user‚Äôs modifications to the PHP file remain in the editor for them to fix (also these save requests now happen over Ajax so the user never leaves the page). If they try leaving the page without fixing the error and successfully re-saving, they‚Äôll get an ‚ÄúAre you sure?‚ÄĚ dialog informing them they would lose their changes, in the same way as leaving the Customizer or the Add New Post screen. If the loopback requests aren‚Äôt able to complete, the file edits will also be reverted and the user will be prompted to use SFTP to edit the file.

The JavaScript powering the new updated interface for the theme and plugin editors is located in theme-plugin-editor.js, which exports a wp.themePluginEditor object.

Code Editor APIs

The Customizer code editor control, Custom HTML widget, and file editor all make use of an underlying ‚Äúcode editor‚ÄĚ API that provides an abstraction on top of CodeMirror. In PHP there is the wp_enqueue_code_editor()¬†function which is named and functionally similar to wp_enqueue_editor()¬†for TinyMCE. The wp_enqueue_code_editor()¬†function takes an array of args, including the ability to specify the file type¬†that you intend to edit, or else the file¬†name itself. Alternatively, you can pass a codemirror¬†array arg that has the same structure as what you would pass when initializing CodeMirror in JS. Then depending on the language mode¬†that is either explicitly provided via codemirror¬†arg or which is deduced from the file¬†or type¬†args, the function will specify various defaults depending on the selected mode. For example, if editing CSS then it will enable linting¬†and if editing HTML it will enable the auto-closing of tags. Once the settings array is fully assembled it is then passed into a wp_code_editor_settings¬†filter to give plugins a chance to further modify the settings. If this filter returns false¬†or if the user had previously disabled the syntax highlighting preference, then the function will return false¬†and no scripts will be enqueued. Otherwise, the function will proceed to then enqueue the code-editor¬†script and style along with the wp-codemirror¬†script/style dependencies and then any supporting linter scripts.

The wp_enqueue_code_editor() function will exported its settings array to wp.codeEditor.defaultSettings in JS while also returning it to that a feature can directly pass it into the wp.codeEditor.initialize() API. This initialize method is modeled after CodeMirror.fromTextArea() in that it takes a textarea object or ID as its first argument and then the settings as its second. In addition to the settings exported from wp_qneueue_code_editor() the settings passed into the initialize method can also include several callbacks including onChangeLintingErrors, onUpdateErrorNotice, onTabPrevious, onTabNext. These callbacks are what the various integrations rely on to manage the displaying of linting errors as well as ensuring keyboard navigation.

Here is a simple example of turning the user’s bio into a CodeMirror HTML editor on their profile screen:

add_action( 'admin_enqueue_scripts', function() {
	if ( 'profile' !== get_current_screen()->id ) {
		return;
	}

	// Enqueue code editor and settings for manipulating HTML.
	$settings = wp_enqueue_code_editor( array( 'type' => 'text/html' ) );

	// Bail if user disabled CodeMirror.
	if ( false === $settings ) {
		return;
	}

	wp_add_inline_script(
		'code-editor',
		sprintf(
			'jQuery( function() { wp.codeEditor.initialize( "description", %s ); } );',
			wp_json_encode( $settings )
		)
	);
} );

As noted above, CodeMirror and its bundled modes and add-ons are registered in a wp-codemirror script handle. Also important to note here that this script does not define a global CodeMirror object but rather a wp.CodeMirror one. This ensures that other plugins that may be including other CodeMirror bundles won’t have conflicts. This also means that if you do want to include fortran.js from CodeMirror, that you’ll need to bundle it to call wp.CodeMirror.defineMode() instead of CodeMirror.defineMode(). A workaround for having to do this would be the following, but be aware of potential conflicts:

wp_add_inline_script( 
	'wp-codemirror', 
	'window.CodeMirror = wp.CodeMirror;'
);

Development History

The integration of CodeMirror into core was initially worked on in the Better Code Editing feature plugin on GitHub. A full development history can be found there in the issues, pull requests, and commit log.

The principal contributors to code editing in this release were @afercia, @helen, @georgestephanis, @obenland, @melchoyce, @westonruter, and @WraithKenny.

The key tickets related to code editor improvements in 4.9 are:

  • #6531: Recursively search for files in theme and plugin editors
  • #12423:¬†Include default code editor
  • #21622: Validate or sandbox theme file edits before saving them (as is done for plugins)
  • #24048: Code Editors: Increase the usability of Code Editor‚Äôs files list
  • #31779: Warn users before using a built-in file editor for the first time
  • #38707:¬†Customizer: Additional CSS highlight, revisions, selection, per-page, pop-out (partially completed for this release)
  • #39218:¬†Customize: Harden validation of CSS syntax validity by utilizing tokenizer
  • #39766:¬†Plugin does not gracefully fail when editing active plugin causes fatal error
  • #39892:¬†Default value in Additional CSS
  • #41073: Linting code changes: prevent saving, or add confirm message
  • #41872: Code Editor: Minor accessibility improvements to the CodeMirror editing areas
  • #41887: Code Editor: Error disables the Update File button.
  • #41897: Code Editor: Add reusable code editor Customizer control

#4-9, #codemirror, #dev-notes

Introducing the Gallery widget

In the last major release we introduced Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio. Per that dev note:

WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets (#32417) for not only images (#39993) but also video (#39994) and audio (#39995), on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists.

Now in the upcoming 4.9 release this Gallery widget (#41914) has just landed in trunk in [41590]. Just as users can add galleries to their post content they too can add galleries to their sidebars. The media widgets are being developed with Gutenberg in mind, as widgets are essentially proto-blocks. Gutenberg has ported the Categories and Recent Posts widgets as dynamic blocks so that users can add to their posts what was formerly restricted to sidebars. In the same way, the media widgets are allowing for content that was formerly restricted to post content to also be available for addition to widget areas. As Gutenberg matures, widgets are planned to eventually transition over to use blocks, and the widgets for images, video, audio, and galleries will be able to be migrated over at that time. In the mean time, the user should not have to know there is any difference between post content and widget areas. Once the migration from widgets to blocks is complete, users shouldn’t actually perceive any fundamental change in this regard.

Here are four screenshots that show how the Gallery widget is created and updated:

 

You’ll note that the widget re-uses the same media modals that a user is familiar with when adding and editing galleries in the post editor.

Code Reference

PHP: wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-media-gallery.php
JS: wp-admin/js/widgets/media-gallery-widget.js

Field Type Default Description
title string "" Title for the widget
ids array [] Attachment IDs
columns integer 3 Columns
size string "thumbnail" Size
link_type string "none" Link To
orderby_random boolean false Order by random

There is also a widget_media_gallery_instance_schema filter which can be used to add additional properties, such as a type for Jetpack’s Tiled Galleries. See #42285.

Theme Styling Updates

As with the previously-introduced media widgets, some themes will need to be updated to ensure the proper styling is applied to galleries that appear in the widget area context, since previously galleries would only appear in post content. Please follow #41969 for style changes that are made to the core bundled themes to then also make similar changes to your themes.

Conclusion

The gallery widget was first introduced and tested in the Core Media Widgets feature plugin. The plugin is developed on GitHub and the issues and pull requests related to the gallery widget can be reviewed there for a full history of the feature.

Please report new issues on Trac in the Widgets component, after first checking for any existing Gallery widget tickets.

#4-9, #dev-notes

WordPress 4.8.1 release delayed by one day

The 4.8.1 release was due out today (August 1st), however a performance problem was raised during release preparations. Specifically, the ticket in question is #35293 and its problematic commit on the 4.8 branch has now been reverted, while the changes remain on trunk. A performance fix is pending in #41501, and it may be part of a subsequent 4.8.2 minor release.

We’ve re-scheduled the 4.8.1 release to occur after the core dev chat tomorrow, at August 2nd, 21:00 UTC.

In the mean time, please continue testing the release. A new 4.8.1-RC2 package (ZIP) has been published for you to triple check on your test environments. For more information on testing, see Beta Testing. The 4.8.1-RC2 release contains 29 maintenance fixes and enhancements since 4.8.0, chief among them are fixes to the rich Text widget and the introduction of the Custom HTML widget. For a full list of changes in the release, consult the tickets closed and the changesets committed.

#4-8-1

Fixes to Text widget and introduction of Custom HTML widget in 4.8.1

The 4.8 release caused issues for many sites that had custom HTML in Text widgets, which until now had been common practice. So we’ve been working hard on fixes in the 4.8.1 release which aim to simultaneously serve the needs of novice users and advanced users alike: the rich Text widget (introduced in 4.8), a legacy mode for the Text widget, and a Custom HTML widget.

For more background on the changes in 4.8, see¬†Addition of TinyMCE to the Text Widget. To review, the Text widget in 4.8 includes TinyMCE‚ÄĒthe same visual editor used for writing post content‚ÄĒand it looks like:

Text Widget Legacy Mode

The issues with the introduction of TinyMCE to the Text widget revolve around the ways that TinyMCE attempts to clean up HTML code by deleting empty elements (such as those for dashicons) and dropping attributes it may not recognize (such as HTML5 Microdata attributes). Also with the 4.8‚Äôs removal of the ‚Äúautomatically add paragraphs‚ÄĚ checkbox, there were also issues related to paragraphs and line breaks being added incorrectly.

Note that the Text widget was already designed to preserve the old behavior of the widget until it was modified and thus upgraded, so there are many instances of Text widgets in the wild today that could very well begin to break upon being modified. For this reason the issues were not reported right away and instead started to trickle in steadily after the release.

There were various solutions that were considered, but the one that had the consensus among contributors was:

[Check if the Text widget] was previously saved from an older version of WordPress before TinyMCE was added to the Text widget. If it is such a pre-existing Text widget instance, then use heuristics to detect if TinyMCE would negatively impact the contents of the widget, including the auto-p checkbox being unchecked, whether there are empty tags, and whether there are span, div, script, or style tags. When the Text widget is in this legacy mode, it can have a notice that informs users of the new HTML Code widget and that it should be used going forward. Likewise, in the new mode when TinyMCE is present, when the Text (HTML) tab is selected, there can be a note (perhaps an admin pointer) that encourages users to use the HTML Code widget instead. By implementing this, novice users with basic content in their widgets win, and advanced users with custom HTML content in their widgets will cease from being negatively impacted.

The Text widget in legacy mode looks the same as the Text widget before 4.8, but with the addition of a new notice:

The legacy mode will only be presented for widgets created prior to 4.8.0 that have instance data which match the logic in the WP_Widget_Text::is_legacy_instance()¬†method. The legacy mode will not be presented to newly created Text widgets. Once a Text widget is opened and saved in legacy mode, it will permanently stay in legacy mode. There is a new instance property called ‚Äúvisual‚ÄĚ which will be set to false¬†when a widget is saved in legacy mode. When a new Text widget is created, it is opened in the default visual mode and the new instance will get saved with¬†visual=true.

Text Widget Filters

There is a change in how the filter instance property was used in 4.8.0: in that release, when a Text widget was modified, the fact that it had been upgraded was stored by overloading the filter boolean property to also have the value of "content", indicating that the widget gets content filters applied like a post does. Since this string is a truthy value, I reasoned it would normally work the same in filters that check ! empty( $instance['filter'] ), but it would fail in cases where a plugin tried true === $instance['filter']. So 4.8.1 reverts the overloading of the filter property to again be a boolean, and this should improve compatibility for widget_text filters. Whenever a Text widget is modified with the default visual mode (with TinyMCE) it will get both visual=true and filter=true saved in its instance. When a Text widget is modified in the legacy mode, it will always get visual=false and its filter property will reflect the checked state of the auto-paragraph checkbox.

Another note on filters: special consideration was made for shortcodes in the Text widget given the frequency of plugins and themes adding shortcode support (since the widget does not recognized them by default in core). Plugins and themes have done add_filter( 'widget_text', 'do_shortcode' ) to add support. Since the widget_text filter applies before the new widget_text_content filter (as of 4.8), it will apply before wpautop will have applied, resulting in the possibility of extra line breaks being added undesirably if the shortcode output has new line characters. So to help prevent that from happening, the Text widget will temporarily move the do_shortcode handler from widget_text to widget_text_content just in time while the filters are being applied. See the relevant logic.

Help Pointers

For users who are accustomed to pasting HTML into the Text widget, when an attempt is made to paste markup into the visual editor a pointer will be displayed informing them that they should paste it into the Text tab instead, or to alternatively use the new Custom HTML widget (see section below):

Likewise, when a user opens the Text tab, it will also open a pointer to inform them of the Custom HTML widget:

While pointers are normally displayed on upgrades, these pointers will be displayed even on new installs since they reflect changes to long-standing behavior for the Text widget that users have become accustomed to. Any tutorials that instruct users to use the Text widget for pasting in arbitrary HTML should be updated to instruct the users to select the Custom HTML widget instead.

Custom HTML Widget

For advanced users or for any use case where arbitrary HTML needs to be displayed in a widget (such as a signup form or a 3rd party JavaScript widget), there is now a dedicated ‚ÄúCustom HTML‚ÄĚ widget that is specifically for this purpose. It looks very similar to the classic Text widget, except it has a monospace font and it lacks the auto-paragraph checkbox:

Since users are prompted (per the pointers above) to try using the Custom HTML widget instead of the Text widget for some use cases, it is important that the widget content be able to be freely copied between the Text widget and the Custom HTML widget. For this reason, the Custom HTML widget retains the application of the widget_text filters like the Text widget does. The type of widget for which the filter is applying can be determined by looking at the type of the WP_Widget instance being passed as the last filter argument. When the widget_text filter is applied, it will pass the second $instance parameter in the same format as the Text widget, with title, text (instead of content), and filter and visual properties that are always both set to false (as if the instance was in legacy non-visual mode). In addition to re-applying the widget_text filter, the Custom HTML widget has a dedicated widget_custom_html_content filter whereas the the Text widget has a dedicated widget_text_content filter.

In addition to filter compatibility, the Custom HTML widget also tries to retain theme styling compatibility by using the same widget_text CSS class name on the outer widget wrapper and textwidget on the inner wrapper around the content itself. For any themes that wish to style the Custom HTML widget alone, there are the widget_custom_html and custom-html-widget class names used on the outer and inner wrapper elements respectively. For themes that wish to style the Text widget alone and exclude the Custom HTML widget, the :not() pseudo selector can be used, for example .widget_text:not(.widget_custom_html) and .textwidget:not(.custom-html-widget) for the outer and inner wrappers, respectively.

The markup generated by a Custom HTML widget on the frontend will look like:

<section id="custom_html-6" class="widget_text widget widget_custom_html">
  <h2 class="widget-title">My Title</h2>
  <div class="textwidget custom-html-widget">My Content</div>
</section>

This same Custom HTML widget’s instance data will look like:

{
  "title": "My Title",
  "content": "My Content"
}

For more specifics on the Custom HTML widget, refer to the subclass: WP_Widget_Custom_HTML.

Here is a list of tickets related to the Text widget and Custom HTML widget which are closed in the 4.8.1 release:

  • #40907:¬†Introduce widget dedicated for HTML code
  • #40951:¬†New Text Widget ‚Äď Switching Between Visual/Text Editor Strips Out Code
  • #40960:¬†Set `‚Äôfilter‚Äô => ‚Äėcontent‚Äô` on starter content ‚Äúbusiness info‚ÄĚ widget
  • #40960:¬†Widgets: The Text widget should respect the ‚ÄúDisable the visual editor when writing‚ÄĚ setting
  • #40972: TinyMCE editor in Text widget does not have RTL contents
  • #40974: Updated text widget do not save text (when using paste)
  • #40986: Widgets: text widget and media widgets cannot be edited in accessibility mode
  • #41021: Text widget does not show Title field or TinyMCE editor
  • #41158:¬† Increase tinymce panel z-index
  • #41361: Text widget can raise JS error if customize-base is enqueued on widgets admin screen
  • #41386:¬†Text Widget ‚Äď Wording ‚Äď Legacy Mode 4.8.1 beta
  • #41392:¬†Theme styles for Text widget do not apply to Custom HTML widget
  • #41394: Text widget: Rename legacy mode to visual mode and improve back-compat for widget_text filters

 

#4-8-1, #dev-notes, #tinymce, #widgets

Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio

As first introduced in the Image Widget Merge Proposal, WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets (#32417) for not only images (#39993) but also video (#39994) and audio (#39995), on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists. To quote [40640]:

The last time a new widget was introduced, Vuvuzelas were a thing, Angry Birds started taking over phones, and WordPress stopped shipping with Kubrick. Seven years and 17 releases without new widgets have been enough, time to spice up your sidebar!

Since widgets are a very old part of WordPress (since 2.2), widgets in core have been very much entirely built using PHP with some Ajax sprinkled on top. In the time since WP_Widget was introduced in 2.8, WordPress has made dramatic shifts toward developing interfaces in JavaScript, including with the Customizer in 3.4 and the Media Library in 3.5, and more recently with the focus on the REST API and the editor (Gutenberg).

Given that the media widgets are naturally interfacing with the media library JS, it is necessary that the media widgets make use of JavaScript to construct their UI instead of relying on PHP. The media widgets fully reuse the existing media modal frames for not only selecting the media to display but also to edit all of its properties: attachments can be selected from the media library, while external media can be inserted by URL.

Initial groundwork for shimming JavaScript into widgets was added in 3.9 via the widget-added and widget-updated events, which are also being utilized in 4.8 with the Addition of TinyMCE to the Text Widget. A more recent proposal for making JavaScript more of a first class citizen can be found in #33507 and the media widgets incorporate some of its patterns that were also prototyped in the JS Widgets plugin. The media widgets make use of a Backbone View to manage the widget control’s UI and a Backbone Model for reading and manipulating the widget instance data.

Base Media Widget

PHP: wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-media.php
JS: wp-admin/js/widgets/media-widgets.js

The three widgets all extend a WP_Widget_Media PHP abstract class; in JS the Backbone view wp.mediaWidgets.MediaWidgetControl and wp.mediaWidgets.MediaWidgetModel are extended. A unique aspect of how the media widgets work is how instance data is validated and sanitized. Normally widgets utilize procedural code to sanitize instances via a subclassed WP_Widget::update() method. The media widgets, however, make use of a REST API schema returned from WP_Widget_Media::get_instance_schema() to sanitize instances declaratively. The WP_Widget_Media::update() method iterates over the schema and uses it to sanitize and validate the instance properties. (Adding schemas to the base WP_Widget class is also proposed in #35574.) The JSON schema is extended to include a couple custom properties: media_prop provides the media JS property name that the widget instance maps, and the should_preview_update flag indicates whether a change to that prop should cause the control preview to re-render (this would be retired with a React rewrite and/or leveraging of corresponding blocks in Gutenberg).

The WP_Widget_Media abstract class has one abstract method which subclasses must implement: WP_Widget_Media::render_media(). This is the method that WP_Widget_Media::widget() calls with the $instance props to render the media for a given widget media type. Before the props are passed to the method, the $instance is applied through  widget_{$id_base}_instance filters.

A media widget subclass should output additional JS templates as the control needs by extending WP_Widget_Media::render_control_template_scripts(). Scripts that the widget control requires can be enqueued by extending WP_Widget_Media::enqueue_admin_scripts(); this is also where the PHP exports can be done with calls to wp_add_inline_script().

The REST API schema is exported from PHP to JS on the subclassed MediaWidgetModel prototypes. Other properties on the prototypes which should be extended include l10n and mime_type. The model subclasses are registered by assigning them to the wp.mediaWidgets.modelConstructors object, keyed by the widget ID base (e.g. media_image, media_video, etc). In the same way, the Backbone View wp.mediaWidgets.MediaWidgetControl is subclassed and registered by adding to the wp.mediaWidgets.controlConstructors object, also keyed by widget ID base. This is similar to how control types are registered in the Customizer.

The MediaWidgetControl and MediaWidgetModel will be instantiated once a widget control is expanded. Their instances will be then added to the wp.mediaWidgets.widgetControls object and wp.mediaWidgets.modelCollection respectively.

There is a subclass of a media controller and a couple media views in the wp.mediaWidgets namespace. These extensions to media classes are needed due to current limitations in media extensibility. They may be removed/reduced with improvements in #40427.

As with the incorporation of TinyMCE into the Text widget, the incorporation of the media library into the media widget has necessitated constructing the widget‚Äôs form fields differently than how they are normally done.¬†Widgets in core have historically utilized static HTML for their control form fields. Every time a user hits ‚ÄúSave‚ÄĚ the form fields get sent in an Ajax request which passes them to the WP_Widget::update()¬†method and then the Ajax response sends back the output of¬†WP_Widget::form()¬†which then replaces the entire form. (Note widgets in the Customizer behave differently since there is no Save button in the widget, as updates are synced and previewed as changes are made; read more about¬†Live Widget Previews.) This worked for static HTML forms in the past, but in the case of the media widgets the UI built with JavaScript instead of server-side PHP.

To avoid having to rebuild the media preview every time the user hits Save on the admin screen, the media widget puts its UI elements outside of the container that is ‚Äúmanaged‚ÄĚ by the server which gets replaced with each save. (A similar approach has also been employed by the new TinyMCE-extended Text widget in 4.8.) Since core does not yet represent a widget‚Äôs state in a JavaScript model (again see #33507), the media widget syncs its MediaWidgetModel¬†props with hidden inputs that get rendered by WP_Media_Widget::form()¬†in order to be sent to the server for preview and saving. The container for the media widget‚Äôs fields is¬†.media-widget-control¬†and the traditional container for a widget‚Äôs input fields as rendered by WP_Widget::form()¬†is .widget-content:

For examples of how to implement media widgets, see the three implementations included in 4.8 as follows.

Image Widget

PHP: wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-media-image.php
JS: wp-admin/js/widgets/media-image-widget.js

Field Type Default Description
attachment_id integer 0 Attachment post ID
url string "" URL to the media file
title string "" Title for the widget
size string "medium" Size
width integer 0 Width
height integer 0 Height
caption string "" Caption
alt string "" Alternative Text
link_type string "none" Link To
link_url string "" URL
image_classes string "" Image CSS Class
link_classes string "" Link CSS Class
link_rel string "" Link Rel
link_target_blank boolean false Open link in a new tab
image_title string "" Image Title Attribute

Video Widget

PHP: wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-media-video.php
JS: wp-admin/js/widgets/media-video-widget.js

The video widget allows for embeddable video formats to be selected from the media library or linked to externally by URL. In addition, URLs to YouTube or Vimeo may also be provided since the video shortcode logic supports rendering them via MediaElement.js. It is possible for plugins to add support for additional oEmbed providers via extending the video widget control’s isHostedVideo method; for more, see the Jetpack PR for adding VideoPress support.

Field Type Default Description
attachment_id integer 0 Attachment post ID
url string "" URL to the media file
title string "" Title for the widget
preload string "metadata" Preload
loop boolean false Loop
content string "" Tracks (subtitles, captions, descriptions, chapters, or metadata)
mp4 string "" URL to the mp4 video source file
m4v string "" URL to the m4v video source file
webm string "" URL to the webm video source file
ogv string "" URL to the ogv video source file
flv string "" URL to the flv video source file

Note that the presence of format-specific fields is dependent on what is returned by wp_get_video_extensions().

Audio Widget

PHP: wp-includes/widgets/class-wp-widget-media-audio.php
JS: wp-admin/js/widgets/media-audio-widget.js

The audio widget allows for embeddable audio formats to be selected from the media library or linked to externally by URL. Note that there are no oEmbed audio formats supported since the audio shortcode logic only supports rendering players for actual audio files.

Field Type Default Description
attachment_id integer 0 Attachment post ID
url string "" URL to the media file
title string "" Title for the widget
preload string "none" Preload
loop boolean false Loop
mp3 string "" URL to the mp3 audio source file
ogg string "" URL to the ogg audio source file
m4a string "" URL to the m4a audio source file
wav string "" URL to the wav audio source file

Note that the presence of format-specific fields is dependent on what is returned by wp_get_audio_extensions().

Default Themes Updates

Themes that add custom styles to the MediaElement.js player (namely Twenty Thirteen and Twenty Fourteen) were updated from just styling it within syndicated content, to also include instances within widgets. Most themes don’t restrict styles for captioned images or media players to just post content, that is, limit CSS selectors to classes output by post_class(). If your theme does, make sure to either remove that constraint or include a .widget selector.

Conclusion

The work on the new media widgets in core was conducted in the Core Media Widgets plugin and on its corresponding wp-core-media-widgets GitHub repo. Many of the decisions that were made in the architecture of the feature can be found there in the GitHub issues and pull requests.

Keep in mind that the media widgets will likely undergo many more changes with the incorporation of the Gutenberg editor, and that widgets themselves will likely see many changes to align with Gutenberg’s editor blocks which are now being prototyped. Essentially if you can insert a given type of block into the editor, there should also be a widget available for representing the same content.

#4-8, #dev-notes, #media-widgets

Addition of TinyMCE to the Text Widget

Note: Update: A follow-up post has been published regarding Fixes to Text widget and introduction of Custom HTML widget in 4.8.1.

In its first couple years, WordPress lacked rich/visual text editing. Before TinyMCE was incorporated in WordPress 2.0, users had to edit post content as raw HTML with some support from the Quicktags buttons. When widgets were introduced in WordPress 2.2, the Text widget was included which allowed a user to add content to their sidebar. Nevertheless, unlike the post editor, the Text widget did not incorporate TinyMCE, nor did it include Quicktags. For twelve years, since TinyMCE was added to core in 2005, users have had to hack around with HTML in their Text widgets to do things as simple as make text bold or add links. This has been featured even as recently as the 4.7 release video. Well, as of WordPress 4.8, the Text widget is finally getting the same treatment as the post editor with the introduction of TinyMCE for visual text editing, while still supporting raw HTML editing via a Text tab but now with the additional help of Quicktags:

Text widget: visual tab Text widget: text (HTML) tab

A primary reason for the long delay in incorporating TinyMCE into the Text widget was the difficulty of cleanly instantiating another copy of the WordPress visual editor dynamically after the page has loaded. Since WordPress 3.3 there has been the wp_editor() PHP function for instantiating an editor for the initial page load, but there was no facility for instantiating editors afterward, such as when adding a new Text widget to a sidebar. So in #35760 a new JS API was introduced for dynamically instantiating WP editors on the page: wp.editor.initialize(). This JS API is used for the new TinyMCE-powered Text widget; for more, please see Editor API changes in 4.8.

Note that by default the Text widget only features buttons for bold, italic, unordered list, ordered list, and link. If you want to add additional buttons to the toolbar, you may use a plugin to enqueue the following JS to add the blockquote button, for example:

jQuery( document ).on( 'tinymce-editor-setup', function( event, editor ) {
	if ( editor.settings.toolbar1 && -1 === editor.settings.toolbar1.indexOf( 'blockquote' ) ) {
		editor.settings.toolbar1 += ',blockquote';
	}
});

Likewise, a custom button can be added via code like:

jQuery( document ).on( 'tinymce-editor-setup', function( event, editor ) {
	editor.settings.toolbar1 += ',mybutton';
	editor.addButton( 'mybutton', {
		text: 'My button',
		icon: false,
		onclick: function () {
			editor.insertContent( 'Text from my button' );
		}
	});
});

A reason for why there is no ‚ÄúAdd Media‚ÄĚ button for the editor in the Text widget is that WordPress 4.8 also includes dedicated media widgets for adding images, video, and audio to sidebars. Another reason is a current technical limitation whereby arbitrary media embeds (oEmbeds) fail to work properly outside the context of post content (see #34115). For this reason if you try to embed a video or something else by pasting in a URL it will not currently expand into the embedded content. The same is true for shortcodes: they are not processed by default since many shortcodes presuppose a global $post as the context within which they expect to be running. Plugins may opt-in selectively to support individual shortcodes by filtering widget_text¬†as they have had to do for many years now.

While not supporting shortcodes, the updated Text widget does have some of the same filters applying to it as the_content, in particular:

  • wpautop
  • wptexturize
  • capital_P_dangit
  • convert_smilies

The Text widget has supported a ‚Äúfilter‚ÄĚ instance property which was reflected in the UI via a checkbox for whether or not to automatically add paragraphs and line break tags (wpautop). For the updated Text widget, this checkbox is removed entirely in favor of aligning its behavior with the post editor where this behavior is always enabled. These filters only apply on Text widgets that have been updated/touched after the 4.8 upgrade. When a Text widget is modified in 4.8, the filter instance prop gets set to a static string ‚Äúcontent‚ÄĚ both the filter instance property and a new visual property will be set to true and then it will apply a new¬†widget_text_content¬†filter which then apply the above functions to the widget text. For Text widgets created prior to 4.8, they will be opened in a legacy mode with the old behavior when it is determined that TinyMCE could mutate the content undesirably; such legacy instances will be saved with visual=false¬†instance property. Read more about Fixes to Text widget and introduction of Custom HTML widget in 4.8.1.

Important: When pasting HTML into the ‚ÄúText‚ÄĚ (HTML) tab of the Text widget, any extraneous line breaks should be removed or else unwanted paragraphs and line beaks may result. This is particularly important when you paste in script or style tags (as in the case of 3rd-party JavaScript embeds), since auto-inserted paragraphs will cause script errors; this will be fixed in #2833. This behavior aligns with longstanding behavior in the post editor, so it is not new, although it does differ from how the Text widget has previously behaved. As noted above, for previously-existing Text widgets that had the ‚Äúauto-add paragraphs‚ÄĚ checkbox unchecked (and thus the filter instance prop set to false), the previous behavior of not doing wpautop will be maintained: only once the widgets are modified will any extraneous line breaks need to be removed. Any such Text widgets created prior to 4.8 will be go into a legacy mode as of 4.8.1 to prevent any data loss. Going forward, arbitrary HTML should be placed into the new Custom HTML widget instead.

The incorporation of TinyMCE into the Text widget has necessitated constructing the widget‚Äôs form fields differently than how they are normally done.¬†Widgets in core have historically utilized static HTML for their control form fields. Every time a user hits ‚ÄúSave‚ÄĚ the form fields get sent in an Ajax request which passes them to the WP_Widget::update()¬†method and then the Ajax response sends back the output of¬†WP_Widget::form()¬†which then replaces the entire form. (Note widgets in the Customizer behave differently since there is no Save button in the widget, as updates are synced and previewed as changes are made; read more about¬†Live Widget Previews.) This worked for static HTML forms in the past, but¬†TinyMCE is a JavaScript component. To avoid having to rebuild TinyMCE every time the user hits Save on the admin screen, the Text widget puts the title field and TinyMCE text field outside of the container that is ‚Äúmanaged‚ÄĚ by the server which gets replaced with each save. (A similar approach has also been employed by the new media widgets in 4.8.) The fields in the Text widget‚Äôs UI sync with hidden inputs which get synchronized with the server; in the Customizer, changes to the TinyMCE field will be previewed after 1 second with denouncing. The container for the Text widget‚Äôs fields is¬†.text-widget-fields¬†and the traditional container for a widget‚Äôs input fields as rendered by WP_Widget::form()¬†is .widget-content:

Themes should already account for the most common HTML elements within the text widgets and provide appropriate styles for them‚ÄĒthe addition of the editor toolbar increases the likelihood its elements will be used in the future. Most default themes needed additional styles for ordered and unordered lists within widgets, so theme authors are encouraged to double-check their themes and test them with content in the text widget that includes markup provided by the editor toolbar.

Initial groundwork for shimming JavaScript into widgets was added in 3.9 via the widget-added and widget-updated events. A more recent proposal for making JavaScript more of a first class citizen in widgets can be found in #33507 and the media widgets incorporate some of its patterns that were also prototyped in the JS Widgets plugin. The synchronization of a widget’s state (instance properties) via hidden text fields can be eliminated once a widget’s state can be fully represented in a JavaScript model.

The Text widget is implemented as a Backbone.js view which is available at wp.textWidgets.TextWidgetControl. Instances of this view are then stored in the wp.textWidgets.widgetControls object. The widget’s control JS will only instantiate for a given widget once it is first expanded, when the widget-added event fires. What’s more is that the widget will only first initialize once the container is fully expanded since TinyMCE is not able to initialize properly inside of a container that is animating. In order to capture when TinyMCE inside the Text widget is initialized, you should use a TinyMCE event like tinymce-editor-setup. Note also that due the Document Object Model, when a widget is moved to a new location in a sidebar and this the TinyMCE iframe is moved in the DOM, this dynamically-created iframe is reloaded and thus emptied out. For this reason, every time a Text widget is moved to a new location the TinyMCE editor in the widget will be removed and then re-initialized. Keep this in mind when extending.

Keep also in mind that the Text widget will likely undergo many more changes with the incorporation of the Gutenberg editor, and that widgets themselves will likely see many changes to align with Gutenberg’s editor blocks which are now being prototyped.

#4-8, #dev-notes, #editor, #widgets