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  • Konstantin Obenland 5:50 am on January 26, 2015 Permalink |
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    Support for Screen Reader Text in Themes.

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 8:04 pm on December 4, 2014 Permalink
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    New Template Tags in 4.1 

    Working on a new default theme is always an opportunity to improve core’s Theme APIs too. With the release of Twenty Fifteen there are quite a few improvements that made it in:

    Archive Template Tags

    Theme authors get to use four new functions to use in their archive templates:

    • get_the_archive_title() and the_archive_title() for returning/displaying the title of the current term, date, post type, post format, or author archive.
    • get_the_archive_description() and the_archive_description() for returning/displaying the description associated with the current term archive.

    They are especially handy when a theme doesn’t have dedicated templates for taxonomy or date archives, but can essentially be used in all archive templates. The description functions only display term descriptions, since no other archive type really offers descriptions.

    Worked on in #21995 and then introduced in r30223.

    Navigation Template Tags

    Core has provided template tags for links between posts and pages of posts for a long time. Now theme authors can resort to higher-level template tags to display an entire navigation snippet. If you’ve built your themes off of recent default themes, or created child themes from them, these should look very familiar. As a heads up: Since default themes have been developed in HTML5 for five years now, there is no HTML4 version of these tags.

    • get_the_post_navigation() and the_post_navigation() for navigation to the next and previous post.
    • get_the_posts_navigation() and the_posts_navigation() for navigation to the next and previous page of posts.
    • get_the_posts_pagination() and the_posts_pagination() for paginated navigation between pages of posts. (Updated for 4.1 RC1, see this post)

    All functions use the same wrapping markup with semantic class names, so it’s easy to style them in one go. The navigation functions accept custom link texts and screen-reader-texts, in case the defaults are not applicable. The pagination functions even accept all arguments that paginate_links() does, too! (Except for the 'type' argument, we need that to be plain so the template tag doesn’t break 😉 )

    Worked on in #29808, introduced in r30065, improved in r30457.

    Also in 4.1:

    Theme Support for Title Tags

    I’ve written about title tags before and will refer to that post for more information about the groundbreaking changes that happened here.

    Page Template Body Classes

    They got a minor update that simplifies those class names and allows theme authors to target folders of page templates. With this /page-templates/full-width.php will produce page-templatepage-template-page-templates, page-template-full-width and page-template-page-templatesfull-width-php. Worked on in #23470 and then introduced in r30100.

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 10:57 pm on October 29, 2014 Permalink
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    Title Tags in 4.1 

    For over three years we have been trying to make it easier for plugins and themes to manage the document title. Kubrick didn’t necessarily set a great example to theme authors by appending the blog name to wp_title(), a practice we have been trying to correct ever since.

    #18548 was created to find a solution to that problem, but after initial excitement hasn’t seen any noteworthy action until a few weeks ago. Yesterday @johnbillion committed a first step towards a brighter future in [30074], introducing a forward compatible way to make document titles fully customizable.

    Adding titles to themes

    Starting with 4.1 and Twenty Fifteen, the recommended way for themes to display titles is by adding theme support like this:

    function theme_slug_setup() {
       add_theme_support( 'title-tag' );
    }
    add_action( 'after_setup_theme', 'theme_slug_setup' );
    

    Support should be added on the after_setup_theme or init action, but no later than that. It does not accept any further arguments.

    By declaring support like this, themes acknowledge that they are not defining titles on their own and WordPress can add it safely without duplication.

    To maintain full forward compatibility, plugins can not check for theme support of title tags, and are discouraged from building functionality around it just yet. The long term plan is to enable users to manage document titles from their admin, independent of which theme they’re using. At that time it will also become more plugin friendly. To make sure this can be achieved however, it was important to rule out backwards compatibility concerns as much as possible.

    While there is no consensus on how the final implementation will look like yet, this should be a good way to get themes started to opt into a more user friendly way. It will also make any future changes that much more impactful when the final version ships.

    Backwards compatibility

    To enable support in existing themes without breaking backwards compatibility, theme authors can check if the callback function exists, and add a shiv in case it does not:

    if ( ! function_exists( '_wp_render_title_tag' ) ) :
    	function theme_slug_render_title() {
    ?>
    <title><?php wp_title( '|', true, 'right' ); ?></title>
    <?php
    	}
    	add_action( 'wp_head', 'theme_slug_render_title' );
    endif;
    

    This would also be the place to optionally add a filter to enhance the document title, along the lines of what recent default themes have been doing.

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 12:08 am on October 16, 2014 Permalink
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    Dev Chat Summary, October 15th 

    Agenda, IRC log.

    Twenty Fifteen (#)
    @iandstewart @iamtakashi
    Twenty Fifteen landed over a week before the deadline. Ian asked to test predominantly mobile and color schemes. A variety of contributors asked if the Sass files could be added back. Neither Ian nor Takashi were very excited about that prospect, since the original Sass files differ greatly from the current CSS. It also raises the barrier to entry for contributing to themes. @wonderboymusic offered to bring them back in sync, after they were attached to #29799.

    Bug Scrubs (#)
    @johnbillion
    Weekly bug scrubs are back. Went to daily bug scrubs for a while during 4.0 but weekly scrubs should allow a good amount of focus. It would be good to see a load of people in the channel on Friday.

    UI Improvements for Core/Plugin/Themes Updates (#)
    @nacin @melchoyce
    Mel wants to start with @pento‘s plugin, since it’s probably 75% of the way there in terms of design, but no updates so far. @avryl offered to help with coding the UI.

    Flow Tickets (#)
    @johnbillion asked for eyes on the flow tickets concerning media, that @rboren brought up on make/flow.

    User/Post Dropdown Performance (#)
    @helen, @ericlewis
    Both are doing a lot of investigative work. Right now looking at how to represent page hierarchy and how to deal with translations ( #22229 ).

    Editor Focus (#)
    @markjaquith, @avryl
    Currently working on the last few issues. @designsimply is interested in doing some user tests. Avril likes the default status to be *on* as it wouldn’t be easily discoverable otherwise. Some feel like the transitions are distracting however, and sometime meta boxes don’t reliably come back. Lots of discussion around whether it should be on by default, or the same behavior like now. No final decision as of now, leaning towards current behavior though.

    Meta/Term/Date Query Enhancements (#)
    @boonebgorges
    Tax query and meta query now support nested params. The abstraction layer that was talked about last week is also in. What’s really needed now is for people using these query classes in plugins etc to make sure that there are no backward compatibility issues. Boone will post a call to that effect on make/core when things are in place in a week or so.

    Open Floor (#)

     
    • Boone Gorges 12:12 am on October 16, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for the summary, @obenland! Quick correction: the abstraction layer we talked about last week has been scrapped for the time being. The query classes are totally independent of each other.

    • Hugh Lashbrooke 6:31 pm on October 20, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “Tax query and meta query now support nested params.” – so stoked to hear this :)

  • Konstantin Obenland 10:08 pm on October 9, 2014 Permalink
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    Dev Chat Summary, October 8th 

    Agenda, IRC log.

    User/Post Dropdown Performance (#)
    @helen, @ericlewis
    No code movement as of recently, but they’re laying out a plan to get both working in plugin form by this time next week. User dropdown works in the plugin already.
    Barring further feedback, still appears that select2 is our best option in terms of a JS helper library.

    Editor Focus (#)
    @markjaquith, @avryl
    Coming together well. At this point as many people as possible just need to test the plugin. There’s also a preview of focus. Mark considered that the existing DFW button could turn into a toggle for the new DFW, not to turn it on/off, but whether to allow its auto behavior or now.

    Meta/Term/Date Query Enhancements (#)
    @boonebgorges
    After last week’s meeting, Boone posted an overview of the Query projects on make/core. Since then, he chugged along on the multi-relational rewrites of the Meta, Tax, and Query classes. He has got a patch ready to post for WP_Date_Query #29822 within the next day, which will complete the set.
    Major blocking issue at the moment is that he needs high-level feedback on the WP_Recursive_Query proposal.

    Session Manager (#)
    @nacin @johnbillion
    Feature plugin to display a user’s active sessions. Not a lot of dev has happened on this but there’s been several bits of discussion on its GitHub repo. One of John’s concerns is how to ensure this UI isn’t too intrusive for most users, because most users will only ever have one active session at a time. It may be best to shove this to the very bottom of the user editing screen. Screenshot. Privacy concerns were voiced over sending I.P. addresses to w.org. While it’s not saving anything in 4.0, it will be saving IPs in 4.1. Nacin suggested to use a geoip API so the page loads with IPs, and then if geoip works, locations show up.

    UI Improvements for Core/Plugin/Themes Updates (#)
    @nacin
    Nacin posted about improvements to the UI for installing/updating plugins/themes/core. @melchoyce tried to do some initial mockups for this week but it looks like they’re still in the ideas stage. Sketches, rough prototype. Further discussion in #29820.

    Open Floor (#)

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 11:57 pm on September 9, 2014 Permalink
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    Twenty Fifteen 

    It’s that time of the year again, time to work on a new default theme!
    This year we’re back to creating a brand new design. Like Twenty Fourteen, this is being targeted for December and thus WordPress 4.1.

    @matt asked Takashi Irie to design Twenty Fifteen, and they are both closely collaborating with @iandstewart, who also worked on Twenty Ten and Twenty Eleven. The design is far from finished, but the following screenshots might give you an idea of what direction it is headed this year:

    Twenty Fifteen is a clean, blog-focused theme designed through simplicity. With careful attention to typography, the theme treats text as a major part of the user interface. It features Google’s Noto Serif and Sans – a font family designed to be visually harmonious across many of the world’s languages, and a perfect fit for the internationalization strides being made in WordPress core.

    The theme is also designed to maximize the impact of core’s customization tools – Custom Headers and Custom Backgrounds. These tools will allow any Twenty Fifteen blog to be easily personalized.

    Last but definitely not least, Twenty Fifteen uses a mobile first approach in its design, remaining attractive and focusing on an optimal browsing experience across a wide array of devices from mobile to widescreen desktops.

    All of these things come together to present content cleanly for any of Twenty Fifteen’s users – a simple default theme.

    —Takashi Irie

    Next steps will be to finish the design, create a working theme, commit that to core, and then break it and make sure it adheres to the high standards and expectations we all have for default themes.

    If you are interested in contributing, please subscribe to this blog (if you haven’t already), and leave your name in the comments. As soon as it’s ready for public breaking, testing, and patching, I’ll make sure you get a ping!

    Further reading:

     
    • Amy Hendrix (sabreuse) 11:58 pm on September 9, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      You had me at “Twenty…”

      • utahman1971 8:23 pm on December 18, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        They had me at none of the vertical menu themes. They are ugly. That navigation is old or is just set for one sided people. Kind of takes up the pages space too. Never really like the look either. I rather have something you don’t have to spend hours coding to add something to it, then use there default theme that makes you have to do extra coding. You would at least think for a CMS software that was built since 2005 would offer something free that is like a premium paid product. I guess people are right nothing is for free anymore, unless it is do all the work for something you would like on it.

        • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 6:11 am on December 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          The default theme is not something that will work for everyone. We know that. It’s an example of what you can do.

          If you want a different theme, we have over a thousand :) https://wordpress.org/themes/ All free.

        • leonp 1:57 pm on December 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I rather like them. It’s easier to read down the page. “Ugly” is subjective…

          Also, a hamburger menu @ narrow screen that expands to a vertical menu @ widescreen is a pretty “modern” design pattern.

          There’s lots of space on a widescreen these days…

        • thoughtwell 3:30 pm on December 29, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          +1 for leonp’s comment—was sitting in a client meeting the other day and couldn’t help but notice how awkward large fields of negative space look on large screens and how the content just becomes so isolated looking as this happens… especially when a full-screen background image-cover is used and the photo crops strangely due to letterbox formatting… a vertical side menu would probably help even out the proportions a bit…

          Lager screens are becoming more commonplace as the price drops… and gaming consoles, televisions, htpcs, etc. have folks using browsers on their televisions (probably not a mass demo, but still considerable for some projects, depending on what is being developed… and projection screens are pretty common in company boardrooms… I guess it’s just another case of ‘the right tool for the right job.’

    • Mel Choyce 12:01 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      <3

    • Carbis 12:03 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very glad to see design inspiration come from twentyeleven and twentyten.

    • codel1417 12:07 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can we have a theme focused around color and design instead of something that matches an ios device. Color is good. white is boring and bland.

      • Robert Dall 12:12 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        This theme as it is being stated will allow users to completely customize their blog based on their customizer choices. You can see from the screenshots provided that white is just the starting point and the world is your oyster in terms of colour choice…

    • Robert Dall 12:09 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Take me to your leader… Actually just direct me to his blog… Oh and seriously: Yes please let me break this theme for you…

    • Reza 12:10 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks Good to me, at least not left align on bigger screen like 2014 :)

    • ericdaams 12:14 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The link to Takashi Irie’s post about Twenty Fourteen is broken 😉

    • Eric 12:14 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m already a fan. :)

    • bmoredrew 12:14 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Awesome. Looks great!

    • Nikhil Vimal (NikV) 12:20 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Howdy! I would definitely be interested in working on the next default theme!

    • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 12:21 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice, I like this!

    • Ryan Cowles 12:21 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking sharp! I’d be happy to help in whatever capacity I can.

    • Ben Lobaugh (blobaugh) 12:22 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I have not been this excited about a new default theme in a few years!!!

    • Spencer Hill 12:28 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is this built using Bootstrap?

    • Josh Levinson 12:45 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can’t wait to see it made a reality! I’d love to help out in any way I can.

    • IgniteWoo 12:45 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      99% of the world reads left to right. Therefore, single sidebar on the left = distraction = poorer visitor experience.

      Lets hope 2015 is avoids the various design fiascos of 2014.

    • marsjaninzmarsa 12:53 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice and clean and Material-like – I’like it! 😀

    • webdevmattcrom 12:59 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to taking it for a spin and breaking stuff!

    • Michelle Langston 1:00 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love it! I’m interested in contributing however I can! :)

    • fikrirasyid 1:02 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This looks really fantastic. Same here, I’m really interested in contributing 😀

    • derekspringer 1:11 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Almost looks like 2012 fancier, side-bar’d younger brother!

    • David A. Kennedy 1:44 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks awesome! Ping me as well. I’ll contribute whatever code I can as well as coordinating with the Accessibility Team for testing. We’ll test for accessibility from the earliest build possible. I’d love for Twenty Fifteen to carry the accessibility-ready tag, just like Twenty Fourteen. :)

      • Graham Armfield 5:18 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        +1 David. accessibility-ready should be the default path from now on.

        • Olivier Nourry 9:33 am on September 23, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I’d even go further: the default theme should be the top-of-its-class with regards to accessibility. And it should brag about it. It’s a unique and efficient way to spread knowledge about accessibility to people who usually do not care too much about it, and most of time never heard of it.

    • s.r. 1:49 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks good! Simple and clean.
      However one thought crossed my mind why we always have “blog-focused” themes? WordPress stepped much further than just a blog CMS, so I believe WP could once in awhile make one for proper website to show how to it is done. :) Just saying

      • Graham Armfield 5:15 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Totally agree with this. All of the WordPress websites I’ve created for people have been for small
        /medium sized businesses and charities. A good, modern, business-based default theme would be really useful.

      • Xavier Borderie 9:22 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        You mean, like the current theme, Twenty Fourteen, which is a magazine-like theme? 😉

      • Andrew Nacin 6:45 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        And Twenty Twelve, which wasn’t designed to be blog-focused either.

        • Marcel Stephan 11:34 am on November 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I’ve used Twenty Twelve a lot of times for small business and other, but it’s not responsive enough. So a theme based on a small business would be great.

      • faospark 7:38 am on September 26, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I agree @ s.r. and graham. lets call things for what it is and probably do things that is current and useful. i thought sending out wodpress 2014 default theme into the wild was a huge statement from the core the were moving out from this blog type of themes like wordpress 2013 default and yeah maybe 2012 was designed not be blog focused but come’on sir Nacin. look at on how 2012 default theme looks like? it does not require one to be a rocket scientist to figure out that it was meant for a blog. I appreciate the work of the core but for this theme release im little bit not ease with it. i like the look of the theme but the fine print tells me that more likely its gonna downloaded by users but be kept unused.

      • Ian Stewart 8:26 pm on October 1, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        You should write a blog post about this with some visual examples — or even an example, working theme. It’d be great to see more ideas and discussion around default themes. You can have an impact here. Everyone can. And it doesn’t hurt to start thinking about Twenty Sixteen sooner rather than later.

    • Brent Logan 1:50 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Beautiful already. Please ping me.

    • cramdesign 1:53 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m in. Ping me.

      Where is the appropriate place to discuss the design? Here?

    • Philip Arthur Moore 2:47 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      > create a working theme

      What’s your game plan for the codebase? You had some awesome food for thought post-2014.

    • Philip Arthur Moore 2:48 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Also, ping me. Always happy to help break this stuff. :)

    • Nick Halsey 3:02 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’ll help out again, as time allows with ongoing Customizer work I’m exploring.

      It’s good that Twenty Fifteen will emphasize headers and backgrounds to this extent, right as we re-imagine media in the Customizer (including a new Background Image control) and hopefully officially deprecate and (conditionally) redirect the standalone header/background screens in 4.1.

      Let’s make sure we leverage and showcase some of the new things that the Customizer can do in the code. I already see potential for a conditional-contextual control for header/sidebar color when there is no image, for example. Most importantly, we should show how simply the Customizer can be leveraged by themes by keeping the code side minimal. A versatile theme like this is made even more powerful by giving users the power to achieve a custom design without code (or too many options).

      Given the visual similarities to Twenty Twelve, are we planning on only shipping the three most recent themes with new installs, or will we be keeping Twelve in new installs still? The problem with dropping it is that it’s the only “CMS”-oriented theme of the last four bundled ones, whereas we would now have two blog themes. But given the visual similarities and the clear advantages to the newer one, I think Twelve should be dropped (and it’s easy enough to grab from the repo if wanted).

    • Japh 3:07 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      <3

    • doughamlin 3:36 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very interested in helping.

    • rilwis 4:08 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I love the design, simple and beautiful. It’s very convenient to use for a personal blog.

    • Zulfikar Nore 4:18 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Interested in helping and ready to start breaking when you are.

    • Zoe Rooney 4:22 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’d be happy to help as well!

    • Sujay 5:00 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Would be happy to contribute!

    • Morten Rand-Hendriksen 6:05 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m all in. Hit me up.

    • Chris Lema 6:28 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great. I’m in.

    • Sakin Shrestha 6:29 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice and Clean Design. Simply Love it. Thanks and will check in more detail.

    • Slobodan Manic 6:36 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks really nice. I’d be happy to contribute.

    • Tarık ÇAYIR 6:57 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Simple and new modern design.

    • LittleBigThings 7:16 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It looks very nice.
      I am happy to follow the development of a default theme for the first time.

    • Caspar 7:20 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks nice, ping me when you need it broken.

    • blumenberg 7:49 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I would be happy to help, count me in. (^_^)

    • Michel - xiligroup dev 8:02 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      As author of multilingual plugin named xili-language and child themes of bundled themes like twenty fourteen.
      As done previously in tracs, I am ready to contribute – by example – to add some filters at right place : this will avoid un-registering some widget to after clone it with including customisation of query… ( Don’t hesitate to question me.

    • zomidaily 9:34 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wow… can’t wait to see another great default WordPress theme.

    • Nashwan Doaqan 10:00 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It looks really Nice!! .. waiting for it :)

    • fritoebola 10:25 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      December ???!!!!!!! But we want it NOW!!!!! 4.0 is live!!!! :'(

    • Jack Lenox 10:40 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Woot!

    • Torsten Landsiedel 11:41 am on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m in, too! And this comment section should be read by everyone who is participating. Great thoughts!
      http://konstantin.obenland.it/2013/12/19/twenty-fifteen/

    • Sharon Austin 12:37 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Definitely. Ping me.

    • Jose Castaneda 12:53 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m for any direction you choose in order to try and break this. Will this theme be a11y-ready?

    • Tracy Rotton 1:09 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      ::hand raised::

      Looking forward to contributing on this!

    • WP Sites - Brad Dalton 1:48 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Ping me please when ready. Thanks

    • Tammie 2:30 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! I’m excited to see and poke this around. I’d love to help in any way.

    • Yojance 2:53 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This looks amazing. Can’t wait to try it on my site.

    • Tracy Levesque 3:47 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yeah 😀

    • firewatch 5:46 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Ping me please. :)

    • Dave Clements 5:51 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great guys, though I have to say, I think I was more excited to see a picture of what I believe to be the West Pier in Brighton (my hometown) featured so prominently.

    • Mary 6:07 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m really excited to see this! Please count me in for contributing wherever I can be helpful.

    • David Marichal 6:46 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to contributing. Ping me.

    • Joan Artés 7:23 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It will be an honor to contribute. Ping me :)

    • Eduardo Reveles 9:40 pm on September 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      o/

    • Alex Vasquez 6:08 am on September 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I guess it’s okay. If you’re into that kind of thing. =)

    • michaelaterndrup 1:53 pm on September 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to it I try to create my own theme but fail…

    • techjewel 5:32 pm on September 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Awesome!

    • Jesper Johansen (jayjdk) 10:41 pm on September 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks very nice. Ping me please :)

    • memuller 1:16 am on September 12, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice and simple – I like it.
      Count/ping me in.

    • menkom 3:29 am on September 12, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hmmmmm… am i the only one that does not like it…. seems extremely bland and limited…. i guess i have to see the final result..

    • Gaurav Tiwari 2:23 pm on September 12, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Simple and Trendy theme. And the best, it is ‘really’ readable.

    • Stephen Edgar 10:33 pm on September 12, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Impressive, much like :)

    • chrissyrey 2:57 am on September 13, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Count me in!

    • Ahmad Awais 4:52 am on September 13, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Design is lovely. I am a big fan of Minimal Themes. Looking forward to build & contribute the frontend of this theme. Count me in.

    • Haseeb Ahmad Ayazi 3:19 pm on September 13, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice theme actually. It will suits the WordPress 4.1 , try to make it more customizable. I am too much tired of using third party themes.

    • abe_charles 3:42 am on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      While I think that Twenty Fifteen looks promising, it is light years behind what it should be and I understand it’s still being worked on but it need excerpts as many great themes nowadays employ those features and not just pictures in the same rows as texts but videos as well.

      Twenty Fifteen needs to have more colours. The white thing is too plain as is. If it’s going to have a white background predominantly it needs some flavour to it.

      Plus the menu bar should be interactive with the ability to show images and a mega menu when the cursor hovers over it and if that is not in by default it should be in the theme’s options. All cards should be on the table or at least in the theme’s options.

      Those are my suggestions. Keep the screenshots coming. I am glad that things developed on this theme so quickly.

    • Eric Lewis 3:37 pm on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think we’re missing out on an opportunity to doing something Javascript-forward here. Aaron Jorbin proposed something similar for Twenty Fifteen, and I’d like to echo his thoughts.

      The WP API would benefit greatly were a default theme built on top of it. We have an API that needs real world usage – what’s more real world than a default theme that ships to 20% of the web?

      We can introduce non-trivial front-end Javascript to theme developers, which would be a great educational service for the community.

    • abe_charles 3:45 pm on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Suggestion: Try to make the excerpts on this theme be set or defined by featured images without having the featured image eclipse the post on the main page like in the default Twenty Fourteen theme.

    • abe_charles 3:53 pm on September 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Suggestion: Make items in a menu bar be of different colours by default or customizable, similar to the effect the “Fourteen Colors” plugin has on the Twenty Fourteen theme. But this should be a built in feature in the Twenty Fifteen theme and it would be great if when hovered over a menu item the set featured image associated with the posts or some of the traits of the posts or posts themselves be displayed for a particular menu item or category be displayed, like a modern menu.

    • abe_charles 1:12 am on September 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Suggestion: It would also be great to have a slider with featured posts like the one in Woothemes’ “Headlines” theme and excerpts as i have been saying all this time is key and we need a theme with a decent type of font. No crappy fonts please. it takes away from the greatness of the theme.

    • ajay.khullar2 7:44 pm on September 22, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The link to Takashi Irie’s post about Twenty Fourteen is broken again :)

    • Emil Uzelac 9:59 pm on September 22, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Look nice on any device! <3

    • Patrick Rauland 2:14 pm on September 23, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Always happy to help break things Obenland! :)

    • ThatChris 10:46 pm on September 23, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m in! :)

    • Paal Joachim Romdahl 11:29 pm on September 23, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      What features could be added to Core that would also help make the theme even better/easier to use/etc? I am thinking that a subgroup who are working on the theme could also be working on improving aspects of Core at the same time.

    • Ahmad Awais 4:44 am on September 24, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      @konstantine any further news about how and when we are going to contribute?

    • activedirectory-faq 7:39 am on September 24, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks nice and is much more my taste than twenty fourteen

    • iluchen 2:40 pm on September 25, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      wonderful!

    • Justin Kopepasah 12:46 am on September 28, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yet another awesome looking theme for core. Looking forward to digging in to it!

    • aglaonika 10:26 am on September 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great design. Would like to join if I didn’t miss the deadline.

    • vishal_chitnis 6:01 pm on October 6, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice, looking forward to contributing

    • Siobhan Bamber (siobhyb) 10:00 pm on October 6, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If you are interested in contributing, please subscribe to this blog (if you haven’t already), and leave your name in the comments. As soon as it’s ready for public breaking, testing, and patching, I’ll make sure you get a ping!

      I’d like to help test when it’s ready too!

    • Tony Ketteringham 3:25 am on October 8, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Happy to help as well if you need any more.

    • ianarmstrong 10:50 pm on October 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I have some concerns that the default layout isn’t keeping up with what we know about user experience. I would love to see a priority placed on purpose -> pitch -> call to action in terms of how the information is presented.

      One of the big trends in design right now is the use of subtle animations to help the user better understand [a] what they just did and [b] what they are supposed to do next. I’d like to see these types of animations callable by class, so that if we create a class called .t15_button it’ll automatically use the appropriate styles.

      While I’m happy to see the theme going back to a cleaner look, there is so much more that it can be. WordPress twentyX series dictates the course of design for all non-premium themes across tens of thousands of sites. I think it would be unfortunate if we stepped back to TwentyTwelve, updated for HTML5 flexbox support and schema.org compatibility.

    • gd6d 7:56 pm on October 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Would be happy to contribute too!

      • gd6d 7:50 am on October 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If no menu is activated, the pages title are not visible in the sidebar. If you delete the conditional “if has menu” line 12, sidebar.php, it works fine… Is it going to stay?

    • Maria Antonietta Perna 10:45 am on October 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice clean look for this new theme. I’m always eager to update my knowledge of WP theme development and best practices through the latest default theme, therefore I hope the code is clear to understand and generously commented and that the features that WP offers are made use of, especially the Customizer. I look forward to seeing the proper ways of adding the customization options that most users expect in themes using the Customizer in the default theme, especially after the WP upgrade to v.4. My sincere thanks to this awesome community.

    • dariodev 12:52 am on November 12, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! Ping me, please!

    • Avi_Lambert 10:57 pm on November 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Woot! Looks like a mobile first theme.

    • Jincheng Shan 11:19 am on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Why Twenty Fifteen didn’t include tag.php and category.php although in archives.php it says Twenty Fifteen has already included them?

    • Fabrizio Pivari 2:11 pm on November 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can you add in social menu 500px and tunblr icons?

    • sonisitez 9:34 am on November 16, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Im waiting :)

    • divnull 9:17 am on November 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wow! Glad to see the spirit of 2011 and 2012 is back! Clear, crisp, simple. I’m happy to skip 2014. :-)
      Good job! :-)

    • wassem mansour 5:29 pm on November 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Twenty Twelve Rules Forever :)

    • ncjcj 8:56 pm on November 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I am going to update one the two volunteer sites I keep. It calls for the global nav to be horizontal at the top with drop-down menus.

      Can this be easily achieved with a child-theme (I write my own css) and does the core funtionality easily allow for drop-downs?

      I wanted to use the 2015 just because they get out of date so fast.

      Thanks

      Nancy

    • suzettefranck 11:30 pm on November 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      My blog theme is a child I made of Twenty Thirteen since Twenty Twelve. I think I will have to upgrade to Twenty Fifteen, can’t wait to see how it turns out. I use Twenty Fourteen on all my new blogs, but loved my girlie child theme.

    • David Favor 8:59 pm on November 20, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Theme Check reports following (very minor) problems with Twenty Fifteen.

      REQUIRED: The theme needs to have a call to wp_title(), ideally in the header.php file.
      REQUIRED: The theme needs to have tags, ideally in the header.php file.<br /> REQUIRED: The theme doesn’t have post pagination code in it. Use posts_nav_link() or paginate_links() or next_posts_link() and previous_posts_link() to add post pagination.

    • Monika 9:12 am on November 25, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      hi my first feedback to Twenty Fifteen :-)
      I love the typographie and the elegance of this theme.

      I can’t understand:
      $content_width = 660;
      but the postthumbnail size is set to 825
      set_post_thumbnail_size( 825, 510, true );

      Why is the default thumb bigger than content width?

      This theme has one widget area.
      In source the widget area appears before the main content => this is a really strange design pattern

      If someone would like to have a very good position on search engines I can’t recommend to use this theme because the sidebar appears before the main content in source.

      And is it possible to decrease the http requests for styles and scripts? Everybody is loving a fast website :-)

      I know I can use a child-theme to create a second widget area under the content and use the first sidebar only for navigation, combine scripts and so on.

      Thanks

      Monika

    • Sunnyj 6:51 am on November 28, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Noto Sans is a bad choice, very poor quality hinting on the digits 1234567890, especially at 14px or less they will get noticeably blurry. Better off sticking with Open Sans or something else imo.

    • gd6d 5:59 pm on November 30, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I use this theme on my website. I have a problem with SEO plugin like Yoast or All in One. I can’t save any change on title or description fields… I had to change the theme, make my corrections, save, and return to Twentyfifteen…

    • Sami Niemi 12:17 pm on December 4, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I need to have Twenty Fiveteen for my site :)

    • Edward R. Jenkins 8:47 pm on December 6, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Interested in contributing and/or testing!

    • wholroyd 7:30 pm on December 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks like the Flat theme from YoArts, but the article tail looks better and I hope you can put widgets in other places than just in the left menu column.

    • OlalaWeb 9:47 am on December 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi all! Ping me as soon as Twenty Fifteen is released! We’d love to create a Child Theme :)

    • praveenrk 10:10 am on December 18, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great themes …..cool work

  • Konstantin Obenland 4:23 pm on July 10, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , bundled-theme,   

    @lancewillett and I will hold a Bundled Theme Office Hour tomorrow, July 11, 2014 1700UTC in #wordpress-themes to clean out all tickets in the 4.0 milestone, starting with enhancements.

    Everyone interested is invited to join us! Please feel free to test/review patches prior to tomorrow’s office hours, comment on the tickets etc., everything helps.

     
  • Konstantin Obenland 1:55 am on April 15, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , ,   

    HTML5 Galleries & Captions in WordPress 3.9 

    WordPress 3.6 introduced HTML5 versions of popular template tags, starting out with comments, the comment form, and the search form. With the 3.9 release we add galleries and captions to that list. Now, when adding HTML5 support for those features, WordPress will use <figure> and <figcaption> elements, instead of the generic definition list markup.

    To declare that your theme supports these new HTML5 features, add the following call to your theme’s functions.php file, preferably in a callback to the after_setup_theme action:

    add_theme_support( 'html5', array( 'gallery', 'caption' ) );
    

    For forward compatibility reasons, the second argument with the specific parts can’t be omitted when registering support. Otherwise a theme would automatically declare its support for HTML5 features that might be added in the future, possibly breaking its visually because of it.

    For both galleries and captions not only the markup changes when a theme declares its support for them, there are also peripheral changes that come with it.

    Galleries

    By default, galleries will not include inline styles anymore when in HTML5 mode. This caters to the trend of disabling default gallery styles through the use_default_gallery_style filter, a filter that even the last two default themes used. With that, theme developers can always start with a clean slate when creating their own set of gallery styles.

    We also took the opportunity to remove the line breaks between rows of images. Not only did they encourage an inferior way of positioning elements, more importantly they were non-semantic html elements that are meant for presentational use, and they made it harder to style galleries.

    Captions

    Up until now, captions received an additional 10 pixels of width, to keep text flowing around the caption, from bumping into the image. As @nacin put it, this has vexxed theme developers for years, and even resulted in the addition of a filter in WordPress 3.7 to manipulate the caption width.

    We were not able to completely remove the inline style in HTML5 mode, it’s still necessary to force captions to wrap, but we’re no longer the adding 10px of width. We also removed caption styles in the editor, bringing it on par with how non-captioned images are displayed:

    Twenty Thirteen and Twenty Fourteen have been updated to support both features, while retaining backwards compatibility with older WordPress versions. There is a remote possibility however, that child themes that use element selectors to overwrite gallery or caption styles can lose those customizations. Please test your child themes with the current development versions of the last two default themes.

    If there are any questions about the current implementation, feel free to leave a comment below.

     
    • andrei1709 5:08 am on April 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Awesome! Thank you very much for this update :)

    • Manuel Schmalstieg 12:07 pm on April 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Glad to see that the HTML5 mode removes the BR tags from the gallery markup. That’s great news for responsive theme development!

    • Morten Rand-Hendriksen 3:12 pm on April 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is great and long overdue. I always say WordPress is at the forefront of web standards and the two thing that have been lagging behind are the galleries and comments. This is a major milestone that will change the way we think about built in features.

    • glueckpress 9:15 am on April 16, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      (goes updating themes)

    • Justin Kopepasah 6:43 am on April 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is great news. I was happy when the filter was introduced and now I am elated to see the ability to implement HTML5 galleries completely. Definitely adding this to my latest theme.

    • car57 6:52 pm on May 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I am not a developer, so would you be so kind as to explain what is meant by:

      To declare that your theme supports these new HTML5 features, add the following call to your theme’s functions.php file, preferably in a callback to the after_setup_theme action:

      add_theme_support( ‘html5′, array( ‘gallery’, ‘caption’ ) );

      I have a functions.php file for a child theme. I don’t know what code to insert to have “a callback to the after_setup_theme action”

      TIA

      • Knut Sparhell 12:39 am on May 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        A callback is a function (or class method) that is added to an action by add_action(). In this case add_action( 'after_setup_theme', 'my_theme_setup' );. Inside my_theme_setup() function you can add the theme support. It could also be added in other actions, like ‘init’ or ‘wp_loaded’, but not before ‘after_setup_theme’ has fired. If you just add the support in the outer scope of functions.php it may be executed too early in the load process. The internal data structures to receive this theme addition may not have been initialised before ‘after_setup_theme’.

        The outer scope of functions.php (and plugins) should only add actions and filters, nothing else. All things you want to do should be inside a “callback” (a function or a class method, to be precise).

        See http://code.tutsplus.com/articles/the-beginners-guide-to-wordpress-actions-and-filters–wp-27373

    • car57 7:56 pm on May 14, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      no matter how i add php to functions.php, this script is never run. Still getting old-style dl with inline css. Sigh.

    • paulinelephew 12:02 pm on July 23, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi there,

      I am using the Argo theme and I have no caption displaying with galleries.
      I have tried about everything (including contacting the theme support a zillion times and they won’t get back to me).

      I inserted the lines below in function.php and nothing happens:

      add_action( ‘after_setup_theme’, ‘argo_setup’ );
      add_theme_support( ‘html5′, array( ‘gallery’, ‘caption’ ) );

      the website is http://www.terredalizes.fr

      If anyone can help it is greatly appreciated!

      Cheers,

      Pauline

  • Konstantin Obenland 6:59 pm on August 16, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    Featured Content Office Hours 

    As my last task as acting lead for Featured Content, I’m happy to announce our first IRC chat on Monday, 1700 UTC in #wordpress-dev, led by @wonderboymusic.

    We will talk about the project organization and intended functionality for the plugin (on a high level!). Goal of the meeting is that everyone has a clear understanding of where the project is headed, what the next step in the process will be, and who is working on that.

     
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