CSS Chat Summary: 29 July 2021

The meeting took place here on Slack. @notlaura facilitated and @danfarrow wrote up these notes.

Housekeeping

Custom Properties (#49930)

  • @notlaura shared her draft Make post calling for contributors. UPDATE: The post has now been published here!
  • @Dave Ryan shared a note from his PR about the need for some common colour values – more discussion needed on this
  • @ryelle gave an update on her recent progress:
    • common.css has been updated and pushed to the try/custom-properties branchbranch A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses branches to store the latest development code for each major release (3.9, 4.0, etc.). Branches are then updated with code for any minor releases of that branch. Sometimes, a major version of WordPress and its minor versions are collectively referred to as a "branch", such as "the 4.0 branch".
    • Making PRs to try/custom-properties is a great way for contributors to add their contributions
    • She is keeping try/custom-properties up-to-date with master
    • Anybody can give feedback on any PRs in that repo
  • @Dave Ryan asked if fallback values should be provided as he’s seen some changes that use them and some that don’t. @ryelle clarified that she had used them in admin-bar.css as adminadmin (and super admin) color schemes don’t apply to the frontend, so the custom properties may not be defined. @Dave Ryan pointed out that the same reasoning applies to the login page too
  • @notlaura suggested that the next few meetings which have work sessions should begin with a quick check in for updates & housekeeping and then straight into the work session

CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. Link Share / Open Floor

Thanks everyone!

#core-css, #summary

Editor Chat Agenda: 4 August 2021

Facilitator and notetaker: @jorgefilipecosta

This is the agenda for the weekly editor chat scheduled for Wednesday, August 04, 2021, 04:00 PM GMT+1.

This meeting is held in the #core-editor channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

  • WordPress 5.8 final release.
  • What’s new in Gutenberg 11.2.0 RC
  • Whats next in Gutenberg: July and August.
  • Project updates based on the latest site editing scope & 5.8 Priorities:
    • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. based WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. Editor.
    • Navigation Block & Navigation Editor.
    • Template editor.
    • Patterns.
    • Styling.
    • Mobile Team.
  • Task Coordination.
  • Open Floor.

If you are not able to attend the meeting, you are encouraged to share anything relevant for the discussion:

  • If you have anything to share for the Task Coordination section, please leave it as a comment on this post.
  • If you have anything to propose for the agenda or other specific items related to those listed above, please leave a comment below.

#agenda, #core-editor, #core-editor-agenda, #meetings

A Week in Core – August 2, 2021

Welcome back to a new issue of Week in CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.. Let’s take a look at what changed on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress. between July 26 and August 26, 2021.

  • 24 commits
  • 24 contributors
  • 85 tickets created
  • 7 tickets reopened
  • 58 tickets closed

Pending the appointment of the WordPress 5.9 team, a number of tickets have been fixed, waiting for the next minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality.(s). No release date is yet available for 5.8.1, but it should arrive in a couple of weeks.

Ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. numbers are based on the Trac timeline for the period above. The following is a summary of commits, organized by component and/or focus.

Code changes

Build/Test Tools

  • Post a message to #core in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. when a workflow fails – #52644
  • Remove the check for changes to version-controlled files in the Test Old Branchbranch A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses branches to store the latest development code for each major release (3.9, 4.0, etc.). Branches are then updated with code for any minor releases of that branch. Sometimes, a major version of WordPress and its minor versions are collectively referred to as a "branch", such as "the 4.0 branch". workflow – #53799
  • Revert the test and coding standards changes in [51511]#52644
  • Split packages and blocks to their webpack configs – #53690

Bundled Themes

  • Remove extra trailing spaces from translatable strings in blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. patterns – #53774

Coding Standards

  • Apply some alignment fixes from composer format#53729
  • Coding Standards: Fix typo in the JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. function name for handling the password reset button – #53359
  • Code Modernization: Silence the deprecation warning for missing return type in JsonSerializable_Object#53635
  • Add missing documentation for the minute parameter of WP_Query#53399

Documentation

  • Clarify the @return value for WP_Filesystem_Base::getnumchmodfromh()#53399
  • Correct @return type for WP_Filesystem_Base::getnumchmodfromh()#53793
  • Correct the documented allowed range for the minute and second parameters of WP_Query#53399
  • Document the $wpdb global in WP_Debug_Data::get_mysql_var()#53845
  • Fix typo in the WP_Upgrader::install_package() description – #53399
  • Replace $this in hook param docs with more appropriate names – #53457

Networks and Sites

  • Replace two remaining occurrences of “blogblog (versus network, site)” with “site” in user-facing strings – #53775

Site Health

  • Add some more MySQLMySQL MySQL is a relational database management system. A database is a structured collection of data where content, configuration and other options are stored. https://www.mysql.com/. information to the Site Health Info screen – #53845

Site Health

  • Standardise site health check status message punctuation – #53594

TaxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies.

  • Pass correct default value for $post_id to wp_terms_checklist() in the posts list table – #43639

Themes

  • Add “Template Editing” to the list of WordPress theme features – #53556, #meta5802
  • Make sure get_theme_mods() always returns an array – #51423

Upgrade/Install

  • Add files for 5.8 to the $_old_files list that were missed – #53702
  • Avoid creating nonce during installation – #53830
  • Skip any node_modules directories when removing Genericons example.html files on update – #52765
  • Store correct result when bulk updating plugins or themes – #53002

Props

Thanks to the 24 people who contributed to WordPress Core on Trac last week: @SergeyBiryukov (3), @desrosj (3), @audrasjb (3), @jrf (2), @johnbillion (2), @donmhico (2), @mukesh27 (2), @afragen (2), @pbiron (1), @ocean90 (1), @WFMattR (1), @aristath (1), @youknowriad (1), @poena (1), @pwtyler (1), @tareiking (1), @bobbingwide (1), @zodiac1978 (1), @xknown (1), @hellofromTonya (1), @sanketchodavadiya (1), @swissspidy (1), @schlessera (1), and @ankitmaru (1).

Congrats and welcome to our 2 new contributors of the week! @pwtyler and @tareiking ♥️

Core committers: @sergeybiryukov (15), @desrosj (5) and @johnbillion (4).

#5-8, #meta5802, #week-in-core

Editor chat summary: Wednesday, 28 July 2021

This post summarizes the latest weekly Editor meeting (agenda, slack transcript), held in the #core-editor SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel, on Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 14:00 UTC.

WordPress 5.8

WordPress 5.8 was released on 20th July check out the release post for a complete list of features and enhancements.

GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ 11.1.0

Gutenberg 11.1.0 was released on 21st July check out the release post for a complete list of features and enhancements:

Gutenberg 11.2.0

Gutenberg 11.2.0 RC is now available for testing.

Monthly Plan

The monthly update containing the high-level items that Gutenberg contributors are focusing on for June are:

  • Global Styles.
  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.-based WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. Editor.
  • Navigation block.
  • Full Site Editing.

For a detailed plan check out monthly priorities post.

Updates on the key projects

@chipsnyder

For the Mobile side of things we have:

  • Soon Working to update the Mobile Gallery Block Refactor with the changes from Web, should be ready this week.
  • Work for the iOSiOS The operating system used on iPhones and iPads. share extension on hold as we investigate some of the technical challenges there
     
    In Progress:
  • Editor Onboarding.
  • Adding search to the block inserter.
  • Embed block.
  • Integration tests.
  • Support GSS Font Settings and specific text color settings.

@annezazu

Task Coordination

Note: Anyone reading this summary outside of the meeting, please drop a comment in the post summary, if you can/want to help with something.

@youknowriad

  • I’m working on the Flex Layout a bit, and experimenting with multi-layout architecture for inner blocks
  • I’ve also spent some time on performance jobs, tooling around that and I’m planning to continue that a bit
  • Reviewing a number of PRs

@get_dave

@mamaduka

  • Refactored Post Author component for editor. It now only makes one request to render the component instead of four.
  • Deprecated getAuthors data selector in favor of getUsers.
  • Fixed regression in withFontSizes HOC. I would love to get some feedback on this PR and maybe ship with 5.8.1.
  • Now it’s possible to pass context to getUser and similar data selector shortcuts.
  • Worked on flaky “Block Hierarchy Navigation” test issue.
  • Fixed issue when hitting maxLength in FormTokenField component triggered an error

@annezazu

  • I was out last week but am working on a few things this week for the #fse-outreach-experiment including a hallway hangout happening likely tomorrow (to be announced soon), a survey of block theme authors, and the next call for testing.
  • Working to try to update the github template to use forms as well to perhaps make it easier for people to report issues.
  • Hoping to fit in some time to triagetriage The act of evaluating and sorting bug reports, in order to decide priority, severity, and other factors. too.

Open Floor

@mikeschroder

  • If it’s okay, I’d be interested in shadowing someone close to my timezone (JST, so I’m guessing APAC or EU would work best) on a Gutenberg release, to learn more about what’s involved.
  • I’d eventually love to be able to help with running one, and hoping that would help with learning about the knowledge gaps to fill.

@get_dave

  • Could whoever is running the Gutenberg PluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party release today please let me know how they found the automated changelog feature grouping? I worked on a couple of PRs on that and I’m curious to know whether anything could be improved. My DM’s are open.
  • Also on that note, please can I make a plea for folks to consider being even more proactive in assigning labels to GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Issues? With the correct labels assigned creating the release changelog can be far more automated. I’ve noticed a number of recent PRs without any labels and so I’m hopeful that we can reverse that trend for the benefit of the release leads. Much appreciated.

@mamaduka

  • I try to label the issues, but can do same for PRs as well 

Read complete transcript

#meeting-notes, #core-editor, #editor, #gutenberg, #core-editor-summary

Call for CSS contributors! Help implement custom properties in WP Admin.

WordPress needs your CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. chops!

In #core-css, we have been working for over a year to devise how to implement custom properties for WP Adminadmin (and super admin) in order to allow extended flexibility of color schemes, e.g. dark mode and high contrast. After much deliberation, research, and prototyping, we are now going forward with replacing the current color scheme implementation with custom properties as outlined in ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #49582, and we need some help!

If you’d like to get started on your own or learn details about this work, we are keeping track of our workflow and collecting information that will serve as future documentation in this Google Doc: WordPress Core CSS custom properties.

Join our Custom Property Work Sessions

We also know that it can take time to understand the nuances of a project enough to contribute, it can be intimidating, and it can be hard to designate the time for it. That’s why we are devoting the next three weekly CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. CSS Chats to work time and “office hours”, where experienced folks will be available to help with any issues in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

The dates and times for the CSS Chat: Custom Property Work Session editions of the weekly meeting will be:

  • August 5, 2021 at 21:00 UTC
  • August 12, 2021 at 21:00 UTC
  • August 19, 2021 at 21:00 UTC

Excellent Opportunity for New Contributors

This is a great opportunity to get involved with contributing code to WordPress! The knowledge you’ll need for contributing is:

  • Ability to fork and clone a repo from GithubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ and create your own branchbranch A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses branches to store the latest development code for each major release (3.9, 4.0, etc.). Branches are then updated with code for any minor releases of that branch. Sometimes, a major version of WordPress and its minor versions are collectively referred to as a "branch", such as "the 4.0 branch".
  • Run commands to start the WordPress development environment
  • Read CSS selectors from a file and find what they refer to in the DOM
  • Understanding of CSS custom properties (a.k.a. CSS variables) syntax

Some helpful links for where to obtain this knowledge:

That said, this knowledge is not required for attending the work sessions. If you run into an issue or have trouble following the doc above, just ask in Slack during one of the meetings, and someone will help.

We hope you will join us to help advance and maintain WordPress’ core stylesheets!

#core-css

Devchat summary, July 28, 2021

A week after the release of WordPress 5.8, @desrosj led a well attended but quick chat on this agenda.

Highlighted blogblog (versus network, site) posts

Jonathan drew the group’s attention to these posts:

He also added a late post of his own:

If you’d like to help with 5.8.xx minor releases, leave a comment on that post.

To-do items on 5.8

Moving on, @desrosj opened one last review of the 5.8 release and asked the group for retrospective comments and other feedback.

In reply, @chanthaboune said she’d likely have her retrospective up later in the day. And she said @matveb will shortly have some thoughts about features to target for 5.9.

Remember, also, that trunk is open now, so if you’re a committercommitter A developer with commit access. WordPress has five lead developers and four permanent core developers with commit access. Additionally, the project usually has a few guest or component committers - a developer receiving commit access, generally for a single release cycle (sometimes renewed) and/or for a specific component., keep committing whatever you feel is ready! (Ed. note: Plus, we’re also in alpha for 5.9, so whether you’re a committer or not, if you’re passionate about bringing a new feature into CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., now is the time to do what it takes to land it.)

Component maintainers

@sergeybiryukov checked in with news on Build/Test, where ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. #53363 has details on some bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes and updated naming to follow established conventions.

On U[grade/Install, Sergey added a second plug for his feedback request on the updater proof of concept highlighted above.

Open Floor

Above, in highlighted posts, you probably noticed that @desrosj asked for comments on his minor-releases post if you want to help with the 5.8.x minors. He actually added that suggestion in Open Floor.

#5-8, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

CSS Chat Agenda: July 29, 2021

This is the agenda for the upcoming CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. meeting scheduled for Thursday July 29 at 21:00PM UTC. The meeting will be held in the #core-css channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If there’s any topic you’d like to discuss, please leave a comment below!

#agenda, #core-css

WordPress 5.8 ‘Tatum’ Retrospective

A lot of things changed with the way that the WordPress 5.8 release was managed. A retrospective is always a good idea after a project, but in this case I wanted to be sure I cataloged the big changes for anyone who felt that it was different, but couldn’t quite put words to it. I originally shared this with the release team in Slack.

  • The teamwork had a different feeling. Instead of having buddies or cohorts of learning contributors (roughly one-to-one), we put the squad in a public channel to coordinate the work (one-to-many).
  • The release process had a different feeling. We made feature freeze independent of any other type of milestone and also are trying to be more focused about what work is done in each phase.
  • The included features had a different feeling. Instead of flipping the switch on a massive change for everyone, full site editing is being being shipped in smaller, more manageable chunks so it’s easier to catch up and we can iterate as we go.
  • The environment is different. We’ve all been struggling through this pandemic and being isolated from those we care for. Whether we recognize it or not, that has a profound impact on what we choose to do with our spare time, how we are able to meet others where they are, and whether we “grow through” or “bounce back” from hurdles that stand in our way.

Anyone is welcome to participate in this retro, so please take a few moments to fill in the form or leave public feedback in the comments below. It is not anonymous in case I need some clarification, but your email address will not be kept. The form will be open until August 15, 2021.

Thank you everyone for your contribution to this release, and thanks in advance for taking the time to help make future releases even better!

#5-8, #retrospective

Consistent minor release squad leaders for each major branch: Trial run retrospective and 5.8.x releases

During the 5.8 release cycle, a Release LeadRelease Lead The community member ultimately responsible for the Release. and Release Deputy was named for all 5.7.x releases in a trial run. The experiment was an attempt to address several pain points that made executing minor releases needlessly difficult. Each of the pain points of the minor release cycle were expanded in detail in the original post.

For the 5.7.x releases, @peterwilsoncc and @audrasjb were named as Release Lead and Release Deputy respectively. In the months between the 5.7 and 5.8 releases, they successfully planned and released 2 minor 5.7.x versions with an average of 4.5 weeks between each. The gap between the final minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality. (5.7.2) and 5.8 was 9.7 weeks.

Feedback

In an effort to evaluate how this process went, they were asked for some answers to a handful of questions. Here is some collected feedback from @peterwilsoncc on how the process went.

What went well?

Generally I thought the experiment was successful and it was good to be able to concentrate (and only be expected to concentrate) on the minor releases rather than try to track both major and minor. More specifically:

  • Getting a few more people in the AEST timezone involved than usual helped with coordination.
  • Starting early my time for releases was good for the .1 version as it went longer than expected.
  • Probably should have asked for author rather than contributor permission on w.org/news so I could actually publish the posts I prepared.
  • Having scripts prepped a day in advance was great at reducing stress and allowed for dry-runs (excluding commit).

What went poorly?

  • Night owls or not, I don’t think it was great having me in APAC and @audrasjb in EU working as team leads, everything that was good about release times for me was exactly the reverse for @audrasjb (and @desrosj but to a lesser extent).
  • Better prep on the .1 release could have shortened the time for committing and moving on to the release party.
  • Needed to pull in a couple of people on the release day for the .1 release.
  • Finding someone with mission control access is not easy (especially in timezone). The list of those with permissions is really out of date, and some probably don’t need release permission any more.
  • I didn’t delegate some of the adminadmin (and super admin) stuff well and ended up doing a fair bit at the last minute as a result (on me for not asking).

What did you learn?

  • How to release GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ packages, although doing so on my first production commits to the repository was a little brave.
  • Depending on the number of security backports, and how far back they need to go, release day for a minor can be busier than a major.
  • Process page in the handbook is quite out of date: updated a few steps after each of the two releases.

What support did you receive?

A lot.

  • @gziolo and @isabel_brison helped a great deal with getting the Gutenberg release process down, especially @gziolo by updating the undocumented steps as I asked questions.
  • @audrasjb, @desrosj and @whyisjake with release processes, both in advance and on the day.
  • Code review of shell scripts to attempt to speed up the process.
  • @dd32 with release day stuff, including catching quite a few things I was unaware of on the day.


What support could you have used?

Needed a lot more support from editor team with some planning tasks. The team was consumed with 5.8 and Full Site Editing, so they did not have much time to spare.

What were some responsibilities or tasks you had to take care of that you did not anticipate?

  • Expected I’d need to prep some release day scripts, but didn’t realize how many until I started doing them. Again, probably would have been helped by better delegation
  • Didn’t realize I’d need to do NPM releases at the start but figured it out well before the actual release

Anything else you feel is worth sharing?

Generally I think it went well and was successful.

Continuing the trial in 5.8.x releases

Because the experiment was generally successful, it will be repeated in 5.8.x releases. To reiterate the ideal criteria that was listed in the original proposal, the two contributors serving as release lead and release deputy will be responsible for:

  • Publishing timelines and plans for each minor release.
  • Executing these plans through release day.
  • Coordinating with the Security Team lead to improve the flow of fixes from the team to users.
  • Assembling and requesting help from other volunteers for each release as deemed necessary (docs, test, specific focus areas, etc.).

Ideally, one of these two contributors has a technical background (with the abilities to identify, confirm, test, and approve bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. fixes and changes), and the other has a project manager or coordinator background (with the abilities to create release timelines, coordinate contributors, and help unblock efforts).

One additional (potentially optional) criteria would be that either the lead or deputy be a part of the previous major releasemajor release A release, identified by the first two numbers (3.6), which is the focus of a full release cycle and feature development. WordPress uses decimaling count for major release versions, so 2.8, 2.9, 3.0, and 3.1 are sequential and comparable in scope.’s squad, or be very familiar with the changes that were introduced in that major release. This would further increase the speed at which the minor releases are able to fix related bugs, as they are already “up to speed” on the changes.

In recent years, the gap between major releases has been, on average, 3 to 5 months. If necessary, contributors can tagtag A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses tags to store a single snapshot of a version (3.6, 3.6.1, etc.), the common convention of tags in version control systems. (Not to be confused with post tags.) in and out of the role should circumstances change and it becomes necessary.

If you’re interested in volunteering as a Release Lead or Release Deputy for the 5.8.x releases, please comment below!

Props @peterwilsoncc and @audrasjb for their great work during the 5.7.1 and 5.7.2 releases, and @chanthaboune for pre-publish review.

#5-7, #5-8

CSS Chat Summary: 22 July 2021

The meeting took place here on Slack. @notlaura facilitated and @danfarrow wrote up these notes.

Housekeeping

  • No housekeeping items this week

Custom Properties (#49930)

  • @notlaura shared some background on the project for new participants and suggested another session of individual work time
  • @notlaura added a note to the trac ticket indicating who has “claimed” particular coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. files

30 or so minutes later…

  • @Dave Ryan reported having made solid progress on login.css & finding some near-duplicate shades of blue, for which he added new custom properties. Work on colour unification can come later
  • @notlaura had a similar experience with shades of grey and agreed with the approach. @Dave Ryan added a note about it to the shared doc

CSS Link Share / Open Floor

Thanks everyone!

#core-css, #summary