Bug Scrub Schedule for 5.6

With 5.6 officially kicked off, time to schedule the 5.6 sessions. These 5.6 specific ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. scrubs will happen each week until the final release.

Upcoming Scrubs:

  • 11/5/2020 15:00 UTC
    focus: dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. scrub
  • 11/5/2020 19:00 UTC
  • 11/9/2020 19:00 UTC day before BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 4
  • 11/16/2020 19:00 UTC day before RC1
  • 11/30/2020 TBD (If Necessary)

Check this schedule often, as it will change to reflect the latest information.

Past Scrubs:

What about recurring component scrubs and triagetriage The act of evaluating and sorting bug reports, in order to decide priority, severity, and other factors. sessions?

The above 5.6 scheduled bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. scrubs are separate and in addition.

For your reference, here are some of the recurring sessions:

  • Design Triage: Every Tuesday 14:00 UTC in the #design channel (for both coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. and GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/).
  • AccessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility) Scrub: Every Friday 14:00 UTC in the #accessibility channel.
  • APAC-friendly Scrub: Every Tuesday at 05:00 UTC in the #core channel. This scrub will continue during the cycle, alternating focus between core and editor.
  • Testing Scrub: Every Friday 13:30 UTC in the #core channel.

Want to lead a bug scrub?

Did you know that anyone can lead a bug scrub at anytime? Yes, you can!

How? PingPing The act of sending a very small amount of data to an end point. Ping is used in computer science to illicit a response from a target server to test it’s connection. Ping is also a term used by Slack users to @ someone or send them a direct message (DM). Users might say something along the lines of “Ping me when the meeting starts.” me (@hellofromtonya) on slackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. and let me know the day and time you’re considering as well as the report or tickets you want to scrub.

Planning one that’s 5.6-focused? Awesome! We’ll add it to the schedule here along with your name. You’ll get well deserved props in the weekly Dev Chat, as well as in the #props Slack channel!

Where can you find tickets to scrub? All open tickets for 5.6, in order of priority, can be found here. Tickets that haven’t seen any love in a while are in particular need. Those can be found in this query.

Need a refresher on bug scrubs? Checkout Leading Bug Scrubs in the core handbook.

Questions?

Have a question, concern, or suggestion? Want to lead a bug scrub? Please leave a comment or reach out directly to me (@hellofromtonya) on slack.

#5-6, #bug-scrub

#core

CSS Chat Summary: 29 October 2020

Full meeting transcript here on slack. @notlaura facilitated the meeting & @danfarrow wrote up this summary.

Housekeeping

@notlaura reminded everybody to complete the WordPress 2020 survey – it takes less than 10 minutes so if you haven’t already done so, you know what to do!

CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. Audit (#49582)

@notlaura reported nearing completion of her PR to add config file functionality to the audit tool, as discussed in previous meetings.

@notlaura agreed with last week’s conclusion that the audit report needs a little refinement before being shared on the !important audit ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker., #26350. @sabernhardt consequently offered to update that ticket’s milestone to 5.7, which was welcomed.

Color Scheming (#49999)

@notlaura contributed some valuable insights to last week’s discussion (which she had been unable to attend) about visual regressionregression A software bug that breaks or degrades something that previously worked. Regressions are often treated as critical bugs or blockers. Recent regressions may be given higher priorities. A "3.6 regression" would be a bug in 3.6 that worked as intended in 3.5. testing being a potential stumbling blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. for #49999.

She clarified that visual regression testing had been discussed right at the start of the CSS Audit project, back in March, and drew our attention to a ticket opened by @isabel_brison #49606 Add visual regression testing to core.

@isabel_brison also submitted a PR to integrates visual regression testing into e2e coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. tests, using jest-image-snapshot. In the most recent comment however she concluded that visual regression testing might be better implemented as a separate script to be run locally, rather than part of the e2e core test suite.

Back in the meeting, @notlaura suggested that checking out this PR might be a good starting point to continue exploring the subject. @danfarrow (me!) offered to look into this, despite not really knowing what’s involved. Only time will tell if his eagerness to contribute is misplaced!

@notlaura suggested adding a new agenda item for visual regression testing, to which @danfarrow agreed.

Further to last week’s discussion, @notlaura agreed that seeking feedback on the color scheming tests should be deprioritised until the release of 5.6.

CSS links share + Open floor

@danfarrow shared a link to a processor intensive (in Firefox at least – it’s not so bad in Chromium) CSS only puzzle game where the goal is to click blocks in order to build a lighthouse before night falls.

@notlaura shared a link to an MDN page about CSS Logical Properties and Values.

CSS Logical Properties and Values is a module of CSS introducing logical properties and values that provide the ability to control layout through logical, rather than physical, direction and dimension mappings.

This module introduces many new properties and values into CSS which may soon be encountered in the wild, so it’s good to get a heads-up on what they’re all about.

And with that the meeting was concluded. Thanks all!

#core-css, #summary

WordPress 5.5.3 Release – Some Technical Details

Today WordPress 5.5.3 was released, the day following WordPress 5.5.2.

It is suboptimal to have releases this quickly in succession, but the details below hopefully describe a scenario that you will agree was worth resolving as quickly and safely as possible.

5.5.2 and ZIP installs

An error with one of the fixes made in WordPress 5.5.2 caused an issue with installing ZIP packages available on WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ for new versions of 5.5.x, 5.4.x, 5.3.x, 5.2.x, and 5.1.x. The issue only affected fresh WordPress installations without an existing wp-config.php file in place.

During the release process for 5.5.2, the package testing workflow returned a false positive, so this issue was not caught. This is a difficult issue to test for, but the first steps are to update the existing documentation so future release teams can learn from this experience. Additional research will be required to find a long-term solution. Updates on this progress will be shared in future Make/CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. posts.

To fix this issue, the Core team released WordPress 5.5.3. It provides a clean ZIP package for the WordPress.org download page for the 5.5.x, 5.4.x, 5.3.x, 5.2.x, and 5.1.x versions.

Resolution of 5.5.3-alpha

While work was being done to prepare for WordPress 5.5.3, the release team attempted to make 5.5.2 unavailable for download on WordPress.org to limit the spread of the issue noted in the section above, as the error only affected fresh installations. This action resulted in some installations being updated to a pre-release “5.5.3-alpha” version (see more here). The appearance of a 5.5.3-alpha version is now resolved with the help of the Systems team.

WordPress 5.5.3-alpha has no functional differences to the 5.5.2 release. To correct this version on your site, you can either click the “re-install WordPress” button on the Dashboard → Updates screen or update to 5.5.3.

Props to @jeffpaul for drafting this post, and to @chanthaboune, @cbringmann, @audrasjb, @davidbaumwald, and @hellofromtonya for editing.

#5-5-3

Twenty Twenty-One Test Scrub

As part of the 5.6 release, we’ll be hosting a Twenty Twenty-One focused test scrub today Friday, October 30, 2020, 13:30 UTC in the #core channel on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

What we will test

1. Image blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience.https://github.com/WordPress/twentytwentyone/issues/737 – to test this issue, you need WP 5.6 BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 2 + latest version (trunk) of the theme
2. Dark-mode toggle: https://github.com/WordPress/twentytwentyone-dark-mode/issues/1#issuecomment-718679339 – to test this issue, you need WP 5.6 Beta 2 + latest version (trunk) of the theme + dark mode toggle plugin
3. 2 untested blocks > Group and column https://github.com/WordPress/twentytwentyone/issues/72

How we will test

  • We will go through each item as a group.
  • We will create a thread in Slack for each items where you can post the results. This will make it easier to reply in the existing issues or create new ones.

See you later!

#5-6, #bug-scrub, #test, #twenty-twenty-one

Media Meeting Recap – October 29, 2020

The following is a summary of the weekly media component meeting that occurred on Thursday, October 29, 2020 at 14:00 UTC. Weekly media meetings are now held every Thursday at 15:00 UTC. A full transcript can be found here in the #core-media room in the Make WordPress Slack.

Attendees: @antpb, @sageshilling, @florian-tiar, @hongnizzle, @johnbillion 

Upcoming Meeting Schedule

The team discussed moving the regular meeting time to adjust for daylight savings time. It was agreed moving forward, the meeting will be taking place on Thursdays 15:00 UTC time as opposed to the current 14:00 UTC time. 

5.6 Remaining Tickets

#50972media_handle_sideload() does not allow $post_data to override – Currently owned by @sergey and set to reviewing, this ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. needs unit tests at the moment. @johnbillion mentioned that the functions aren’t very testable without refactoring, so the group agreed this ticket is a candidate to move to 5.7.

#41648Alignment issue on media-new.php when browse uploader screen is activePatchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. is ready to go and @antpb will review and commit. 

#39968Media Library deleting all items on the last page loses pagination/navigation buttons – This has been addressed by @florian-tiar and is ready for review. It was agreed that this was related to existing changes in 5.6 so it is safe to test and commit before the next betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. cycle.

#51396[Media upload.php] Switch back from grid to list mode reopen the modal. – This is a quick fix for an existing bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority.. @florian-tiar mentioned that this is not a critical bug so please chime in in the comments below if you have any thoughts on this fix being implemented in 5.6 or if it should wait for 5.7.

Props @antpb for proofreading and final review.

#media, #summary

CSS Chat Agenda: 29 October 2020

This is the agenda for the upcoming CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. meeting scheduled for Thursday, October 29, at 5:00 PM EDT.

This meeting will be held in the #core-css channel in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/..

If there’s any topic you’d like to discuss, please leave a comment below!

  • Housekeeping
  • Updates
    • CSS Audit (#49582) – Config and template styles
    • Color Scheming (#49999) – Regressionregression A software bug that breaks or degrades something that previously worked. Regressions are often treated as critical bugs or blockers. Recent regressions may be given higher priorities. A "3.6 regression" would be a bug in 3.6 that worked as intended in 3.5. testing
  • Open floor + CSS link share

#agenda, #core-css

Dev Chat Summary – 28 October 2020

The meeting was facilitated by @thewebprincess while @thelmachido took notes. Full meeting transcript on slack

Both groups followed the pre-prepared agenda and started the chat by celebrating the release of WordPress 5.6 Beta 2, please test and review the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. version and share any bugs/issues.

Announcements

WP Version 5.5.2 is scheduled for release on October 29th

Highlighted Posts

@helen is running code review/commit office hours for 5.6, you can get more information about it here.

@chanthaboune outlined the rationale behind dropping the Widgets screen from 5.6 catch up on that and the plan going forward here.

Dark Mode for Twenty Twenty-One
Discussions are ongoing and the team has outlined some options that your input could help narrow down.

Calls for maintainers and focus leads

PHP 8 call for testing
@sergeybiryukov highlighted again that there is need for more testing on PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 8, we have to expand test coverage and creat tickets for any issues found. A thorough report has been written by @omarreiss, @jrff, and @herregroen about the current state of PHP 8 and its compatibility with WP.

Build/Test Tools
Docker environment was updated to allow for using multiple PHP Unit versions, get more details on that here. (Note: this is currently temporarily reverted to investigate test failures) Also, some changes were made to account for the recently released Composer 2.0.

Upgrade/Install Component Update
@audrasjb is drafting on a dev notedev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase. for #50907. It should be ready for review by the Docs lead/cohort/mentor.

Open Floor

Take part in the 2020 WP English Survey, if you are interested to see 2019 survey results, or get links to the 2020 survey in French, German, Japanese, Russian, or Spanish, you can find all that here!

Block Pattern Directory Ideas and Discussion
@daisyo surfaced the post for feedback.

@audrasjb is working on a technical proposal for dropping support/security backports for very old versions of WordPress. He is going to publish a Make CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. post and open a ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. with a patchpatch A special text file that describes changes to code, by identifying the files and lines which are added, removed, and altered. It may also be referred to as a diff. A patch can be applied to a codebase for testing. proposal very soon. The topic should be ready for discussion during the next dev chat. Comments are welcome here. Follow the conversation on slack

Join the team for the next bug scrub on Friday

WP 5.6 Beta 3 is Scheduled for next Monday.

Next Dev Chat meetings

The next meetings will take place on Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 07:00 AM GMT+2 and Wednesday, November 4, 2020, 10:00 PM GMT+2 in the #core SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel. Please feel free to drop in with any updates or questions. If you have items to discuss but cannot make the meeting, please leave a comment on this post so that we can take them into account. 

#5-5, #5-5-1, #core, #dev-chat, #summary

Discussion: align the WordPress release cycle with the industry standard

The standard software release life cycle hasn’t really changed much since the beginning of programming.

WordPress, for the most part, attempts to closely follow the established pattern, with the exception of what can get committed in BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process..

For the past year, there have been conversations in Slack and in the blog about the release cycle. Here is a recap post with a call for feedback.

The WordPress Release Cycle – Today

Each release cycle spans multiple weeks and different phases.

Phase 1: Planning and securing team leads

This period starts as soon as a branchbranch A directory in Subversion. WordPress uses branches to store the latest development code for each major release (3.9, 4.0, etc.). Branches are then updated with code for any minor releases of that branch. Sometimes, a major version of WordPress and its minor versions are collectively referred to as a "branch", such as "the 4.0 branch". is created for the previous version (the code is copied from “trunktrunk A directory in Subversion containing the latest development code in preparation for the next major release cycle. If you are running "trunk", then you are on the latest revision.” to a new “branch” in the repository), which means that two major WordPress versions are worked on at the same time. For example, active development on WordPress 5.6 started about two weeks prior to the WordPress 5.5 release. 

During this phase, the release leadRelease Lead The community member ultimately responsible for the Release. discusses features for the next release of WordPress. Contributors get involved with that discussion. The release lead will identify focus leads for each of the features. Information is gathered from different sources to put together a scope and schedule, followed by a kickoff post.

Phase 2: Development work begins

The kick-off post (see an example from WordPress 5.6) marks the beginning of structured, organised work towards Beta. The length of the period might vary, based on what was achieved during the period before the announcement and what is planned for the release.

Focus leads assemble teams and work on their assigned features. Regular chats are scheduled to ensure the development keeps moving forward.

Phase 3: Beta 

Betas are released and beta-testers are asked to start reporting bugs. No more commits for new enhancements or feature requests are allowed for the rest of the release.

WordPress generally plans for multiple betas.

Phase 4: Release Candidaterelease candidate One of the final stages in the version release cycle, this version signals the potential to be a final release to the public. Also see alpha (beta).

In WordPress, release candidates are considered code complete, so no new source code is introduced unless it is to fix regressions or serious bugs discovered during RC. Even then, every commit during this phase needs sign-off from two CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. committers.

This means hard-freeze on all strings, including those in the About page. It is important to do so to allow the Polyglots team to have enough time to translate it.

During this phase, a new branch will be created thus starting a new release cycle while we are finishing the current.

Phase 5: Launch

This is the final version that is launched and available for update through the dashboard or via download.


How to align the WordPress release cycle with the industry standard

With this in mind, here are the changes that could be put in place to align the WordPress release cycle with the traditional software release cycle.

Phase 1: Preliminary Planning

Stays the same in terms of tasks. Can be renamed “Preliminary planning” for brevity and clarity.

Phase 2: Alpha

While traditionally priority has been given to enhancements and new features, it would be beneficial to address also all the bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority.-fixes that are planned for inclusion in the version of WordPress people are working on. 

Changes

  • Rename to “Alpha” for brevity and clarity.
  • All the bugs that people want to see fixed in the next release need to be addressed in this phase and not postponed to Beta.

Phase 3: Beta

This is where WordPress differs from the standard. 

Historically, 

Beta phase generally begins when the software is feature complete but likely to contain a number of known or unknown bugs.

Wikipedia

Beta is essentially for testing and fixing bugs discovered after the release of Beta 1 (so bugs introduced in Alpha).

Changes

  • Hard freeze on Beta (ETA code and strings), except for the About page.
  • The tickets that were not committed and are still on the milestone at the time of Beta 1 release party, should be moved to a later release, even if they are bugfixes.

Benefits

  • Virtually no new bugs are introduced during Beta. This means focus on testing and subsequent bug fixing. 
  • More efforts and resources could be allocated to beta-testing. 
  • Beta and RC could be and should be fewer and shorter. This is because we address only bug fixes that emerged during beta testing. 
  • Aligning to the norm makes it easier for new people to join since they are used to a certain procedure and they won’t be confused by the way releases are done in WordPress.

Phase 4: Release Candidate

No changes

Phase 5: General Release

Stays the same in terms of tasks. Can be renamed to “General Release” for clarity.

It’s your turn!

Disclaimer: even if everyone is on board, nothing will change for the current release cycle, WordPress 5.6, because we are already in Beta. 

Please post feedback on:

  1. Name changes for Phase 1, 2 and 5
  2. All bug-fixes milestoned to be addressed in Alpha and not postponed to Beta 
  3. Reserving Beta for testing and fixing bugs discovered by testing

Deadline: November 17th, the date scheduled for Release Candidate 1 of WordPress 5.6 and, potentially, when trunk gets branched for 5.7.

Thanks!

Props @azaozz, @davidbaumwald, @joostdevalk and @ireneyoast for providing historical and technical knowledge on release cycle procedures, and @chanthaboune and @jeffpaul for editing suggestions.

#release-process

X-post: Block Pattern Directory ideas and discussion

X-comment from +make.wordpress.org/meta: Comment on Block Pattern Directory ideas and discussion

Editor chat summary: 28 October, 2020

This post summarizes the latest weekly Editor meeting (agendaslack transcript). This meeting was held in the #coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.-editor SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel on 2020-10-28 14:00 UTC and was moderated by @annezazu.

Announcements

  • Gutenberg 9.2.2 was released on October 26th.
  • WordPress 5.6 Beta 2 was released on October 27th! Please install on a test site, play around, try to break everything, report bugs, and all that good stuff: 
  • WordPress 5.5.2 is coming to your WordPress site on October 29th.

Monthly Plan & Key Project Check-in

For context, here’s the overarching plan for October.

Widgets Screen Update shared by @andraganescu

The focus for the people previously working on this screen is now mostly on 5.6 efforts. However, there still is work around advancing various widgets project related issues. For example, @zieladam‘s PR about fixing concurrency related issues, something which became apparent while working on the widgets editor.

Reminder: the widgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. core sync chat is suspended until 5.6 has been released!

Global Styles Update shared by @nosolosw

Global styles has advanced nicely this month with @jorgefilipecosta doing great work related to user-provided color palettes, etc. We’re now going to have a stronger focus on tighten things up to work great with the TwentyTwentyOne blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. based theme. Some of the items in the first wave of work will also be moved to the “future” iteration at this point.

Full Site Editing Update shared by @vindl

Full Site Editing – Navigation update:

  • Search feature for the navigation component has been merged. The next step is integrating it with the site editor.
  • It’s now possible to create new templates from the navigation sidebarSidebar A sidebar in WordPress is referred to a widget-ready area used by WordPress themes to display information that is not a part of the main content. It is not always a vertical column on the side. It can be a horizontal rectangle below or above the content area, footer, header, or any where in the theme. that correspond to default ones from template hierarchy.
  • We shipped the RTL support for the navigation component.
  • PR for creating template parts from multiple blocks selection has been merged.
  • There is a proposed framework PR for introducing a custom status for templates provided by themes (or plugins) as HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. files, which haven’t been customized by the user yet.

In other news:

Task Coordination

Note: Anyone reading this summary outside of the meeting, please drop a comment in the post summary, if you can/want to help with something.  Remember: don’t just focus on code contributions!

@nosolosw

Mainly focused on fixing issues raised in BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 1 and will continue to help with that, but will also come back at global styles work.

@aaroncampbell

Was trying to verify whether Single Column Functionality, which looks like it made it into 9.2, is going into WP 5.6. As a result, this small screen display issue was put in the 5.6 must-have project board to be triaged.

@annezazu

Wrangled some quicker doc updates: glossary terms to include more block based items, triage instructions to include tables for clarity & reasons for closing, and updated the Versions in WordPress doc for 5.6 (need to do the same for 5.5.2). Outside of that, helped clear out a bit of a backlog for unlabeled items, did some FSE testing/bugbug A bug is an error or unexpected result. Performance improvements, code optimization, and are considered enhancements, not defects. After feature freeze, only bugs are dealt with, with regressions (adverse changes from the previous version) being the highest priority. reporting, and started gathering resources for the contributor working group effort!

@youknowriad

Starting to work on more FSE tasks: trying to streamline the flows to enable/disable FSE themes. Still working on documentation for 5.6 new APIs and dev notesdev note Each important change in WordPress Core is documented in a developers note, (usually called dev note). Good dev notes generally include: a description of the change; the decision that led to this change a description of how developers are supposed to work with that change. Dev notes are published on Make/Core blog during the beta phase of WordPress release cycle. Publishing dev notes is particularly important when plugin/theme authors and WordPress developers need to be aware of those changes.In general, all dev notes are compiled into a Field Guide at the beginning of the release candidate phase.. Hoping to have time to chime in on this thread soon.

@mkaz

Has been working on improving e2e tests.

Open Floor

Should we bail on e2e tests after a single failure? Raised by @mkaz.

Marcus has been working on trying to improve tests and asked the group for thoughts on whether we should bail on e2e tests after a single failure as it’s not clear if there’s value in doing so. This is particularly the case for GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ Actions to keep running all the tests after an error happens. After a quick discussion with people sharing their differing approaches to handling failures, @youknowriad summed up the root issue nicely: “I feel the issue is not that we run the whole suite on github but more that the tests actually fail…What we should do is actually take the time to fix the failures even if we’re not responsible for them”.

What should be included in the next “What’s Next” in GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ post? Raised by @daisyolsen.

@nosolosw made sure to link to the previous update around Global Styles. @youknowriad mentioned both that writing Dev Notes should be mentioned for preparing for 5.6 and that he personally would like to see a greater focus on FSE related work.

Is the current plan to use PHPPHP The web scripting language in which WordPress is primarily architected. WordPress requires PHP 5.6.20 files instead of static HTML files for FSE? Raised by @johnstonphilip.

@youknowriad once more swooped in to share that there’s an exploration along those lines being done here.

#core-editor #core-editor-summary

Dev Chat Agenda: October 28th 2020:

Here is the #agenda for this week’s meetings happening at:
Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 0500UTC and Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 2000UTC .

  • Announcements –
    • BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. 2 of 5.6 released – please test and review and bring any issues/bugs to chat to discuss
    • WP 5.5.2 minor releaseMinor Release A set of releases or versions having the same minor version number may be collectively referred to as .x , for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, 5.2.3, and all other versions in the 5.2 (five dot two) branch of that software. Minor Releases often make improvements to existing features and functionality. planned for Thursday, 29 October 2020 1700UTC details here
  • Highlighted blogblog (versus network, site) posts
  • Calls from component maintainers and/or focus leads
  • Open Floor
    If you have something else you want to include to the agenda, please mention it in the comments below.

The #dev-chat meetings will be held on Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 05:00UTC and Wednesday, 28 October 2020, 2000UTC. These meetings are held in the #core channel. To join the meeting, you’ll need an account on the Making WordPress Slack .

#5-6, #agenda