Changes related to Calendar Widget markup in WordPress 5.4

The HTML 5 specification permits the <tfoot> to precede the <tbody> element. That changed in HTML 5.1 and now <tfoot> must follow <tbody>.

Historically, the Calendar CoreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. WidgetWidget A WordPress Widget is a small block that performs a specific function. You can add these widgets in sidebars also known as widget-ready areas on your web page. WordPress widgets were originally created to provide a simple and easy-to-use way of giving design and structure control of the WordPress theme to the user. used the <tfoot> element to display the calendar’s navigation links. But since the HTMLHTML HyperText Markup Language. The semantic scripting language primarily used for outputting content in web browsers. 5.1 spec has changed, WordPress 5.4 moves the navigation links to a <nav> HTML element that comes right after the <table> element.

Moving navigation links outside of the <table> element offers better accessibilityAccessibility Accessibility (commonly shortened to a11y) refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design ensures both “direct access” (i.e. unassisted) and “indirect access” meaning compatibility with a person’s assistive technology (for example, computer screen readers). (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accessibility), with clearer distinction between elements. And a <nav> element is the semantically correct element for any navigation system, in any context.

Here’s a sample of the Calendar Widget’s former HTML markup:

<div id="calendar_wrap" class="calendar_wrap">
	<table id="wp-calendar">
		<caption>February 2020</caption>
		<thead>
			<tr>
				<!-- Day Names -->
			</tr>
		</thead>
		<tfoot>
			<tr>
				<td colspan="3" id="prev"><a href="https://example.com/2020/01/">« Jan</a></td>
				<td class="pad"> </td>
				<td colspan="3" id="next" class="pad"> </td>
			</tr>
		</tfoot>
		<tbody>
			<!-- Calendar Grid -->
		</tbody>
	</table>
</div>

And here’s a sample of the Calendar Widget’s new HTML markup:

<div id="calendar_wrap" class="calendar_wrap">
	<table id="wp-calendar">
		<caption>February 2020</caption>
		<thead>
			<tr>
				<!-- Day Names -->
			</tr>
		</thead>
		<tbody>
			<!-- Calendar Grid -->
		</tbody>
	</table>
	<nav aria-label="Previous and next months">
		<span id="prev"><a href="https://example.com/2020/01/">« Jan</a></span>
		<span class="pad"> </span>
		<span id="next" class="pad"> </span>
	</nav>
</div>

If you’re a sitesite (versus network, blog) owner, and especially if you’re a Theme author, you are invited to test this change thoroughly. You may need to makemake A collection of P2 blogs at make.wordpress.org, which are the home to a number of contributor groups, including core development (make/core, formerly "wpdevel"), the UI working group (make/ui), translators (make/polyglots), the theme reviewers (make/themes), resources for plugin authors (make/plugins), and the accessibility working group (make/accessibility). some CSSCSS Cascading Style Sheets. adjustments.

For example, here are the visual differences for Twenty Twenty, the current Bundled Theme.

Before this change:

After this change:


Update – February 25, 2020

Few HTML classes were introduced in get_calendar() for easier CSS targeting:

  • .wp-calendar-table for the <table> element.
  • .wp-calendar-nav for the navigation wrapper.
  • .wp-calendar-nav-prev for the previous month link.
  • .wp-calendar-nav-next for the next month link.

#prev and #next HTML IDs were also replaced with .wp-calendar-nav-prev and .wp-calendar-nav-next classes.


For full details, see the related ticketticket Created for both bug reports and feature development on the bug tracker. on TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress.: #39763

#5-4, #dev-notes, #widgets