JSON REST API: Version 0.6 and The Future

We’ve finally come to the end of Summer of Code, so it’s time for the final GSoC releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. in this slightly late update (hey, would it be a post by me if not?). This release is mainly a stability release, so there are only minor changes:

  • Huge documentation update – Guides on getting started and extending the APIAPI An API or Application Programming Interface is a software intermediary that allows programs to interact with each other and share data in limited, clearly defined ways. are now available for your perusal
  • Add generic CPT class – Plugins are now encouraged to extend
    WP_JSON_CustomPostType and get free hooking for common actions. This
    removes most of the boilerplate that you needed to write for new CPT-based
    routes and endpoints (#380)
  • Use defined filterFilter Filters are one of the two types of Hooks https://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Hooks. They provide a way for functions to modify data of other functions. They are the counterpart to Actions. Unlike Actions, filters are meant to work in an isolated manner, and should never have side effects such as affecting global variables and output. priorities for endpoint registration – It’s now easier to
    inject your own endpoints at a defined point
  • Update the schema – Now includes documentation on the Media entity, plus more
    (#264)
  • Add better taxonomyTaxonomy A taxonomy is a way to group things together. In WordPress, some common taxonomies are category, link, tag, or post format. https://codex.wordpress.org/Taxonomies#Default_Taxonomies. support – You can now query for taxonomies and terms directly. The routes here might seem strange (/posts/types/post/taxonomies/category for example), but the intention is to future-proof them as much as possible (#275)
  • Ensure the JSONJSON JSON, or JavaScript Object Notation, is a minimal, readable format for structuring data. It is used primarily to transmit data between a server and web application, as an alternative to XML. URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org is relative to the home URL (#375)
  • Check all date formats for If-Unmodified-Since (#378)
  • Register the correct URL for the JSJS JavaScript, a web scripting language typically executed in the browser. Often used for advanced user interfaces and behaviors. library (#376)
  • Correct the usage of metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. links (#379)
  • Add filters for post type and post status data (#380)
  • Separate parent post and parent comment relation (#330)

The big feature for this final week is a bunch of documentation changes. I’ve created guides and documents on how to use the API, intended for both beginners and experts. I’d especially like to highlight the Getting Started guide, as well as the Extending the API guide for pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party developers. The documentation in the past has been less than fantastic, so I’ve made a concerted effort towards it this week. In addition, I’ve also fixed up all the remaining bugs reported via TracTrac An open source project by Edgewall Software that serves as a bug tracker and project management tool for WordPress..

Now that GSoC’s over, what’s next? The aim with the project is to now move it from a solo project to a team one, and to that end, I’ve been working on assembling a fantastic team to work on the project with, with aim to integrate the API into coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. in the future. 3.8 time is fast approaching, so we’ve elected to aim for 3.9 as a more realistic target, although the advantage of the Feature as a Plugin method of development is that we’re not locked down here.

We’re held two meetings so far as a team, and I’ll announce a proper office hours time next week, but I’m also looking to try something new with the organisation of the team. More to come on that in the next team update, but in the meantime, you can check out the internal team discussion site. Anyone looking to get involved in the team is welcome to join as always, but I’d ask that only those serious about working on the project join, as there are a fair few people committed already.

Thanks to everyone, especially my mentors and Jen, for making this project a joy to work on so far. Here’s hoping we can keep the momentum as we push forward with the project.

#gsoc, #gsoc2013, #json-api, #rest-api