Use wp_enqueue_scripts, not wp_print_styles, to enqueue scripts and styles for the frontend

If you are enqueueing scripts and styles, you will want to use one of these three hooksHooks In WordPress theme and development, hooks are functions that can be applied to an action or a Filter in WordPress. Actions are functions performed when a certain event occurs in WordPress. Filters allow you to modify certain functions. Arguments used to hook both filters and actions look the same.:

  1. wp_enqueue_scripts (for the frontend)
  2. login_enqueue_scripts (for the login screen)
  3. admin_enqueue_scripts (for the adminadmin (and super admin) dashboard)

Don’t let the names fool you — they are for both scripts and styles. We’ll probably add equivalent *_enqueue_styles hooks in 3.4 just to makemake A collection of P2 blogs at make.wordpress.org, which are the home to a number of contributor groups, including core development (make/core, formerly "wpdevel"), the UI working group (make/ui), translators (make/polyglots), the theme reviewers (make/themes), resources for plugin authors (make/plugins), and the accessibility working group (make/accessibility). it more obvious, but these hooks have all existed for some time now.

A possible incompatibility with WordPress 3.3 could arise if you are using the wp_print_styles hook to enqueue styles — your styles may end up in the admin.

The fix: Use wp_enqueue_scripts instead. Yes, it’s that easy.

Edit: Yes, the same goes for registering styles. Registering or enqueueing (styles or scripts) should occur on *_enqueue_scripts.

(Background: #19510)

#3-3, #dev-notes