Threaded WordCamp Applications

There are some ongoing quirks that can present challenges when using SupportPress, but as a team the Community Deputies have done an excellent job of making it work and giving Meetups and WordCamps the support they need and deserve. But no matter how hard-working and vigilant we are things sometimes fall through the cracks.

Today while reviewing the queue I stumbled down a path which led me to open a closed WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. application ticket. The application immediately shown upon opening the thread had been vetted, responded to, and a note had been left that the applicant wasn’t a good fit at this time. Everything was handled properly and none of that presents a problem.

But there was still a problem.

That thread contained a separate completely unrelated WordCamp application from an unrelated community submitted a day prior. I’ll vet that application and get back to the organizer today, but finding that raised a red flag. It’s not the first time we’ve seen applications come in nested in the same thread. We’re not sure why it happens aside from applications coming in from the no-reply@polldaddy account. And, aside from added vigilance, there is no fix for it at this time.

So dearest wonderful Deputies, please take a moment before closing threads to ensure that we’re not closing the door on important communication. It may take a few extra moments of our time but it could mean new events, new volunteers, and new ideas in our amazing community.

#deputies, #community-management, #wordcamp

After a conversation with @emanuelblagonic in which the…

After a conversation with @emanuelblagonic in which the question was how to create invoices for ticket sales, I have created a generic ticket invoice template that can be used for all WordCamps based on the one that we used for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. London.

I have added in comments down the side with the details that you will want to update.

As WordCamp organisers, we would update the file with the correct details and then download it as a PDF. We ( WordCamp London) had a dropbox folder where we kept all created invoices for our paper trail and then attached a copy of the PDF to an email that was then sent to the recieptant.

Hope you all find this useful.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1eguq0pnKvZVNDq4vfRiwPcbW45ESs6xANN75vY8smjk/edit?usp=sharing

#wordcamp

Last week Morgan Kay an experienced WordCamp organizer…

Last week Morgan Kay, an experienced WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer whom I vetted and approved to be lead organizer of WordCamp Seattle 2015, notified WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. that she planned to start distributing a WordPress pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party that would not be released under the GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples..

Morgan agreed that this action would mean that she no longer met the WordCamp organizer expectations, so she should remove herself from the WordCamp Seattle organizing team. Brooke Dukes, another member of the Seattle organizing team, was willing to take on the lead organizer role, so the transition was smooth. Planning of WordCamp Seattle continues, and WordCamp Central will make an extra effort to support the Seattle organizing team as their planning cycle continues.

#gpl, #wordcamp, #wordcamps

WordCamp Deputies Update

With the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Deputies program now in place I’ll be requesting a weekly update from each deputy. I thought today was as good a day to start as any. Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions and, Deputies, please post your updates below.

#deputies, #wordcamp, #wordcamps

WordCamp Toolkit Updates

All timelines have been created and are now being field tested/tracked for accuracy by the team. We’ve also been in the process of collecting existing email text and tip sheets to be included in the toolkit. We have collected most of the needed text for Volunteer and Speaker Wrangling communications and are focusing this week on Sponsor Wrangling.

Next up for us will be draft post writing assignments for http://plan.wordcamp.org/ as well as identifying which posts belong in automated milestone emails for Lead Organizers.

Leave your thoughts in the comments and, if you want to help get this toolkit on its feet, we have weekly meetings Wednesday at 19:00 UTC in the #community channel on SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.!

#documentation, #wordcamp, #wordcamps

Sponsorship Squad, Activate!

As you might recall from my call for volunteers to form a WordCamp Sponsorship Squad a few weeks ago, I made a call for volunteers who are experienced WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers and would be interested in helping WordCamp organizers work with fundraising and sponsors. That team has been formed and is made up of:

Kevin Cristiano, WCNYC organizer and one of the co-creators on the Multi-Event Sponsorship Program, yay

Andy Christian, WCNYC

Aditya Kane, WordCamp Mumbai

Valent Mustamin, WordCamp Indonesia

Noel Tock, WordCamp Switzerland

This squad will hold IRC office hours at two different times on Wednesday: Aditya, Valent, and Noel will be in #wordpress-getinvolved at 4:00 UTC, and Kevin and Andy will be in at 17:00 UTC. Hopefully this will allow organizers from all over the world to check in about doubts or questions they have when fundraising or working with sponsors.

If no one has questions for the squad during office hours, squad members will review WordCamp sites to help organizing teams avoid missing anything in their sponsorship packages, as well as reviewing sponsors for any issues around GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples. or trademark that the sponsoring company and organizing team might have missed.

They’ll be recording their reviews and findings on this spreadsheet for now (which I’ll embed into a page when I can figure out how to do that): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiOGe9LzBlkOdGpXclRid1Vmc2Q1eldyU3laTEhBbXc&usp=sharing

Thanks to these volunteers for helping WordCamps keep their/our promises to sponsors and advising organizers on sponsor wrangling! 🙂

#multi-event-sponsorship, #sponsorship, #wordcamp, #wordcamps

WordCamp organizer forums open

Forums are now open on plan.wordcamp.org for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers – new and experienced – to share ideas, knowledge, victories, and woes.

New organizers, ask questions! Experienced organizers, post your tips! Sign in with your wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ credentials to contribute to the knowings.

#wordcamp, #wordcamps

Reusing WordCamp lanyards: our badge of honor, or a pain in the neck?

Currently, WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. provides lanyards to all WordCamps in the US and Canada who need them, then asks the organizing team to collect the lanyards at the end of WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. and ship them to the next, closest WordCamp on the schedule.

This helps reduce the amount of waste that WordCamps create, which of course minimizes our combined carbon footprint, and makes us all very proud. Unfortunately, this project has faced a few challenges:

  • WordCamp organizers often forget to collect lanyards after the event; it’s frequently the last thing they think about on the “day of.”
  • WordCamp organizers often collect some lanyards, but not very many – best retention is 60%, tops.
  • Shipping lanyards from WordCamp to WordCamp cancels out some of the carbon footprint reduction.
  • Some people think it’s yucky to use a lanyard someone else has already used.
  • This program never grew past the US and Canada, because shipping between WordCamps internationally is really expensive.

So where do we go from here? I’d like to keep providing lanyards to WordCamps, if people agree that’s valuable.

Option A is to buy WordCamps recycled PET lanyards — branded with the WordPress Foundation’s logo — in quantities high enough to get us a stellar deal. We could ship out these lanyards in the same package as WordPress swag (buttons, stickers). One advantage here would be that we could then provide lanyards to WordCamps outside the US and Canada, yay! The “yuck factor” would be neutralized, but we could not say that we were in any way reducing the amount of waste created by WordCamps.

Option B is to redouble our efforts to reuse lanyards at WordCamps, and all agree to do better at collecting them at the end of the event. This also doesn’t address the “yuck” factor, but it does reduce the number of lanyards that the WordCamp program generates. This also doesn’t address the issue of non-US and Canada events missing out on this benefit.

Do you have a preferred option, or can you suggest an Option C, D, or E to help us efficiently reduce WordCamp waste? Please share your thoughts in the comments.

#global, #wordcamp, #wordcamps

How much time does it take to organize a WordCamp?

All of it. Just kidding. Well, maybe not. 🙂

I’d like to be able to tell new WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers how much time they should expect to commit to organizing a WordCamp, so people are less often surprised when they get down to crunch time. Why? Well, because one of the best and most effective ways to recruit and retain great volunteers is to give them a good send of what they’re signing up for. There are some great volunteer “job descriptions” out there, but none of them come with an estimate of hours per week or per event, and that can be the make-or-break for some organizing teams.

So this is an open call: if any organizing teams are willing to try to track their WordCamp hours (maybe on the shared budget spreadsheet?) in any way that makes sense to the team, please comment below – so we’ll know who you are – and start tracking! 🙂 Once we get 5-10 camps who have tracked their organizing hours, we’ll publish the collected data to plan.wordcamp.org.

Also, if you’re an experienced WordCamp organizer who is not in active planning right now, but would like to volunteer to check in with organizing teams that have offered to track their time (and help them remember to do it), then please leave a comment below to that effect. This is a job for one person who can spend 1-2 hours a week, popping in to spreadsheets and sending friendly reminders to teams that promised to track their hours.

#events-2, #time-tracking, #wordcamp

Organizing a non-WordCamp

This year has seen twopast WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers decide to organize an independent WordPress conference in their city instead of doing another WordCamp. This is a bummer, since we hate to lose experienced organizers who have a passion for WordPress, but diversity and experimentation make the ecosystem stronger, so it’s kind of exciting at the same time. That said, some boundaries have already become a bit blurry in these situations and we need to reduce confusion for local communities and attendees, so let’s decide on best practices for how to make the transition from being an official WordCamp organizer to running an event that’s not officially affiliated with the WordPress project so that everyone’s clear on what’s appropriate. When we’ve got some agreement here, I’ll add a page to plan.wordcamp.org with this information.

Please read this draft of a plan.wordcamp.org entry and share your thoughts.

Change makes life interesting, and just as we encourage each local community to continually mentor and develop new leaders, sometimes leaders move on to new projects — in this case, organizing new WordPress-focused events.  It’s fun to experiment with other kinds of events, and certainly WordCamp is not the only kind of WordPress conference in the world. More WordPress events is better for WordPress, so everyone wins. And even if you move on to an independent event as your main focus, you are still welcome to participate in WordCamp as well!

Before blazing a new trail, it’s worth checking with WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each. to see if the event type you want to run could take place under the official banner — new event types are encouraged — so you can keep the benefits associated with being an official WordPress event. But if you’ve been involved in past WordCamps and decide to organize a different kind of WordPress event on your own — specifically, one that is not officially associated with the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project — it’s important to make the decision to leave the WordCamp program understanding a few key things.

  1. Sooner or later, there will be another WordCamp in your city. 
    Don’t want to organize another WordCamp? We’ll be sad to see you go, but we want WordCamps to continue. WordCamp Central will post a call for new organizers, and it’s likely that someone else in the local community will be interested in organizing a WordCamp. Would-be organizers can apply to WordCamp Central and, if approved, will get the support we provide to all WordCamp organizers. We believe that multiple events can peacefully co-exist and create a more vibrant community, and it’s expected that any past WordCamp organizers will be supportive of new organizers rather than competitive or adversarial.
  2. WordCamp resources are for WordCamp organizers.
    Social media accounts, attendee and sponsor registration and contact information, etc, are resources built and gathered for the sole purpose of running a WordCamp. As a past organizer, you probably contributed a lot to build/gather those resources, but the work on WordCamp Anytown is tied to future WordCamps in Anytown, and shouldn’t be appropriated by past organizers for their personal pursuits. To put it in specific terms, if you take the attendee mailing list and send them all messages for your new event, then it breaks the privacy policy of WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ sites that states we will never rent, sell, or otherwise give away their information, or use it for any purpose other than that for which it was collected (in other words, WordCamp communication).
  3. WordCamp statistics and history don’t apply to your new event.
    Your new event, because it’s new, doesn’t have a “last year.” It’s accurate to say “Last year, WordCamp Anytown had 750 attendees, so we expect WPEvent to have about 1,000” but not “WPEvent expects about 1,000 attendees this year, since we sold out last year at 750,” or “WPEvent is typically attended by web savvy people between 18-65 with an annual household income of 38-150k per year,” since there’s no “typical” for your new event yet. It’s important to be clear about this so that people don’t think WordCamp is being replaced rather than a new event being created.
  4. Respect the WordPress trademarks.
    When you were organizing an official event, the WordPress and WordCamp trademarks (including the WordPress logo) were available to use and WordCamp Central kept an eye on things to make sure there were no issues with how those trademarks were used. As an unaffiliated event. you’ll be responsible for making sure that if you use one of these trademarks it is within the scope of the WordPress Foundation Trademark Policy.
  5. You can submit your video content to WordPress.tv.
    We will not provide the recording equipment as we do with WordCamps, but sharing the content created at your new event can still take place on the official channel if you like, as long as it meets the submission guidelines.
  6. You’re welcome to participate in future WordCamps.
    Don’t worry about being “blackballed” — we hope not to lose your WordCamp experience and insight even if you are running your own, separate event. As long as you’re still cool with the guidelines and active in your local community, you’re welcome to participate in an official capacity at WordCamp under the next generation’s leadership, or even to organize a WordCamp again.

#wordcamp