Tuesday Training: Why is diversity important — To WordPress and YOUR local community?

The WordPress Community is putting more and more effort into diversity. Why? And why is the Community asking you to get on board with this vision, too?

At all tech events — and WordPress is no exception — diversity is a point of concern. Even if your event already seems diverse to you, there is always more that you can do to make sure that people from all walks of life not only feel included, but valued. There may even be members of other underrepresented groups who you hadn’t considered yet who would benefit from your event.

What do we mean by diversity? If everyone who comes to your event looks alike or comes from the same background, your event is not diverse. We often think of diversity in terms of gender, race, or sexuality… but it also includes class, caste, ability, age, and more.

Let’s talk now about seven reasons why diversity in WordPress events is beneficial to WordPress and your local community:

How Does Diversity Benefit WordPress?

1. Diverse events reflect the diversity of WordPress users

WordPress can be used by anybody, so it should also be built by anybody.”
— Josepha Haden Chomphosy (@chanthaboune), WordPress Executive Director, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US 2021

As developers, designers, marketers, business owners, and content creators, we are not building WordPress and WordPress products just for ourselves. The group of people building WordPress must reflect the group of people who use it. When it’s mainly one kind of person building it, we fail to include the voices and perspectives of other types of users. Just like how new designers who are unaware of color vision deficiencies may not consider adding other forms of visual cues while creating a user interface, there are all kinds of things that we may be overlooking for our users.

2. Diversity makes WordPress more innovative

People from underrepresented groups in technology have a wide range of history, life experiences, and knowledge to share.

When you have a diverse array of life experiences, you approach problems differently. Just as a developer’s point of view is different from a user’s point of view, so are our overall viewpoints.

By inviting more people to the table, more people’s needs will be included and it will bring in fresh ideas that will benefit everyone. Think of how video captions were originally created for people with limited hearing, and now they also benefit, as @annezazu says in Core Editor Improvement: Video Subtitles, people who don’t want to wake a sleeping baby/pet/person nearby, or who prefer reading along while watching your video.

3. Diversity creates space for unique perspectives

More diversity means a better chance of bringing in contributors who are straddling several roles and thus creating unique things with unique perspectives. For example, consider power users who use WordPress in interesting ways, front-end developers, business people who use plugins to make specific kinds of sites, or typographers who use WordPress to do creative things with typography. It’s also important to include people who can talk about running a business in WordPress, how developers can communicate with designers, different things you can do with WordPress, etc.

How Does Diversity Benefit Your Local In-Person or Virtual Community?

4. Fostering a more interesting, creative, and engaged community

“A diverse set of people are more creative. They are also more productive and motivated, and overall, everything becomes far more interesting.

“In fact, diversity and inclusiveness help people stay, invite others, and be far more engaged than a group lacking in diversity and inclusiveness. This makes a lot of sense. If people feel welcome, safe, and don’t feel like the odd man out, they are more likely to enjoy themselves and contribute more.

“And just like a colourful mosaic wall is more fun to look at, a variety of people makes for more fun and interesting experiences!”

– Aurooba Ahmed (@aurooba) (“Allyship for Event Organizers” workshop and “Creating a Welcoming and Diverse Space” workshop)

5. Growing your community

As event organizers, we care about how many people are coming out to our WordPress MeetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. and WordCamps. The more people, the better! Diversity efforts are a great way to grow your community and have even more people with different backgrounds and skills attend your events. Especially if you see the same faces all the time — it’s always nice to have fresh faces and perspectives. Attendees who come to events for networking or job opportunities will find immense value in the prospect of always meeting new people at each event.

6. Creating Diversity in Leadership

More and more, people are recognizing the importance of having a diverse group of leaders for their Meetups and WordCamps. When the leadership team is diverse, the events will benefit from having multiple perspectives, and attendees and volunteers will feel more comfortable participating. Invite people of underrepresented groups who already attend and love your events to be leaders in order to empower them and encourage them to grow your event.

In Vancouver, after Luiza and Andrina took our Diverse Speakers workshop, they created and led a new initiative in our community: A monthly WP Users MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook.. It was very popular!

7. Unlocking new opportunities

Bringing in more people with different opinions, viewpoints, and experiences can unlock more opportunities for them. For example, when Kirsten contributed at our local Vancouver WordCamp, she connected with a local agency, became their first female developer, and quickly became the senior developer and team lead. Simply by being at the event, she was introduced to an opportunity she may not have discovered otherwise.

Because there is a lack of learner advocacy, TC (@tlc1206) is creating a business helping Black men learn JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/. for WordPress. He is creating a community to support and enable men of color to earn a living in tech.

Final Thought

Although I’ve pointed out some good reasons above, you don’t need an objective reason to make your events more diverse. Creating a more inclusive and welcoming environment is also just the right thing to do.

“‘Diversity is good for business‘ is not the point, even if it is true. It’s almost like people are afraid of taking an ’ideological’ stand. It’s ok to want to *just* want to address systemic inequality. You don’t need a ’business case.’”
–John Cutler @johncutlefish

If you would like to learn more about the specifics on how to promote and foster diversity in your local WordPress Meetup or WordCamp community, please sign up for our Allyship for WordPress Event Organizers workshop on November 17, 2021.

Thank you for help on this article @alliennimmons, @annezazu, @cbringmann, @courtneypk, @evarlese

#tuesdaytrainings, #wpdiversity

The Future of Tuesday Trainings

We hope that you have been enjoying the Tuesday Trainings series, and that you have learned some new things along the way!

Tuesday Trainings has been a great and informative series, but it has been brought up recently that the weekly cadence might be too much for the team, at least at this point in time while our resources are a bit low.

There are a couple of options for changing the cadence:

  • Change the cadence to monthly
  • Pause Tuesday Trainings for now and revisit in 2022

Which option do you think would work best? Or are there other options that we could consider? Please comment below with your thoughts.

In addition, we are seeking a volunteer to take over the management of the Tuesday Training series. Managing the series includes writing posts, recruiting other community members to write posts, and maintaining the editorial calendar (which is essentially a spreadsheet to track the topics and posts). If you’re interested in helping out, please let us know!

#community-team, #tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Training: How mentors and deputies are chosen

Earlier in the Tuesday Trainings series, Angela has told everything about Community Deputies and Courtney has explained what the WordCamp Mentorship program is about. This week I thought to share how mentorsMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues. and deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. are chosen.

It’s actually a lot easier than you might think! Like all other roles in the Community Team, becoming a mentorMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues. or deputyDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. is not an invitation-based thing. It’s usually a natural part of someone climbing the leadership ladders of the Community Team from connecting and understanding to engaging.

WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Mentors

If you have experience in organising WordCamps, you are most probably a good fit to be a WordCamp mentor and can apply for that role!

Mentors are not some super WordCamp organisers, they are just like almost everyone else in the WordPress community – individuals who have gained some experience and want to share it and help others. At the same time, the mentors are also themselves WordCamp organisers learning and evolving.

When someone applies to be a WordCamp mentor, the main thing we look for is how involved they have been in organising WordCamps. You don’t have to have multiple years of being a lead organiser in your belt – few years with experience in the team and usually at least one year being a lead organiser is enough. What matters most, is how active you have been in WordCamps and how diverse your knowledge is.

Do you have experience in WordCamp organising and want to help other WordCamp organisers? Take the WordCamp Mentor Self training to get started and then submit an application!

Community DeputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook.

Like mentors, Community Deputies are fundamentally like any other community members – meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. attendees, event organisers and WordPress enthusiasts themselves. There’s no requirement that you should be a community professional.

If you have experience in WordPress event organising, you are active in your local community and you find yourself being a people-oriented person, there’s a good possibility that you would be a good fit in the group of deputies!

Deputies tend to have a little deeper knowledge of the WordPress community, but it’s not necessary to know all aspects of it or the Community Team. The most valuable skill of every deputy, that the team is looking for, is to be very keen on helping community contributors. Other things the team is looking for are passion to develop Community Teams various event programs and to be good in different situations as well as with people. A deputy role is something where everyone grows while carrying out the responsibilities, there’s no set skillset that is required – the most important thing is the mindset and that’s what we are looking for.

If you have a passion for not just helping other WordCamp organisers, but all local communities, apply to become a Community Deputy!


After submitting a WordCamp Mentor or Community DeputyDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. application, few existing deputies will review it. If they find you would be a good fit, they’ll send you an email with a request to have an orientation to tell the essential details before starting to help the community. Sometimes they might ask to take a self-training to exercise your skills a little further before the orientation.

In case your application is rejected, that does not mean that you couldn’t apply again after gaining some more experience in the WordPress community!

Have some questions about becoming a WordCamp Mentor or Community Deputy? Not quite sure if you should or can apply? Do you want to prepare before applying? Come and join us in the #community-team SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel!

#community-deputies, #community-mentors, #mentors, #tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Training: How to Promote WordPress Meetup In Your Local Tech Community To Get More Attendance [Meetup Marketing Guide]

If there’s a question you’d like to see answered or a topic you’d like to see discussed, please share it in the comments or email support@wordcamp.org with the subject line “Tuesday Trainings”. Now onto this week’s topic!

Promoting your WordPress meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. and getting enough attendance might look more challenging at this moment because of COVID-19, but there are a handful of things that you can do and increase participants. The Marketing team previously published WordPress Meetup Tips & Tricks to help you promote your meetup and we hope it helped you. 

In this guide, we will focus more on how to promote your Meetup Event in a non-WordPress community and reach a new audience in order to increase attendance.

First Things To Do: Tailor Your Meetup Event Page For New Audience

  • Catchy Meetup Title & Featured ImageFeatured image A featured image is the main image used on your blog archive page and is pulled when the post or page is shared on social media. The image can be used to display in widget areas on your site or in a summary list of posts.: Meetup titles and featured images are very important to grab initial attention. Make sure you are utilizing that properly to make people sign up. 
  • Compelling Description to Welcome Anyone: Please make sure you have a proper description for your meetup event and a basic agenda. Mention clearly that anyone, even folks that are new to WordPress, is welcomed to join.
  • Information About Speakers & Expertise: Gather diverse speakers with different expertise to make people interested in the event.
  • Pick a Suitable Time & Date: Consider adjusting the time and date for your event to ensure that it is convenient for your targeted audience. Even though many organizers prefer hosting their events during weekends, the perfect date/time for scheduling a meetup changes from place to place.

10 Ways to Promote Your Meetup To Non-WordPress Community

1. Embrace The Power of Social Media

  • Share on Facebook Local Groups: In many countries, Facebook groups are very popular and a great way to engage with people. Find the relevant tech groups in your local area and share your meetup links with some customized caption to connect with that specific community.
  • Share in LinkedIn Feed: Unlike other social media, LinkedIn is popular among professional people. So sharing WordPress meetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. on your LinkedIn feed might be helpful to spread the word to different professional individuals. 
  • Share on Instagram: In these days, people love to share about attending events and their experiences on Instagram with images. A photo from a previous meetup can be intriguing and could be a great way to invite people to join your next event.
  • And Tweeeeet: Twitter is commonly very popular among the WordPress community and you should leverage this to promote your meetup. Use hashtags and share them multiple times on Twitter with your meetup event link.

2. Find Diverse Speakers & Empower Them To Promote Meetup

There are a lot of people who are involved in more than one technology community or use CMSes other than WordPress. Find them and invite them to participate in your WordPress Event. Once they are onboarded, ask them to share about your meetup with their networks, especially out of the WordPress community. Help the speakers with blurbs to share on social media to promote to their followers. You can check out WordPress Diversity Speaker Training Workshop to learn more.

3. Leverage Your Sponsors To Spread The Word

It’s very common to accept sponsorship for the venue or refreshments for in-person meetups. Ask your sponsors to spread the news about upcoming Meetup events.

4. Partner With Local IT/Tech Companies

Reach out to local IT companies, even those that are not focusing on WordPress. Invite them to join your WordPress meetup for FREE and connect with fellow programmers

5. Help Attendance to Promote With Pre-written Text Messages

We are all busy. If you can prepare some pre-written text messages that anyone can easily share to promote your event, then it can be very helpful and a lot of people can quickly share with their networks. 

6. Collaborate With Other Local Communities

In most countries, there are multiple tech communities. You can partner up with them and promote your WordPress meetup in their community to get some new attendees. 

7. Reach Out to WordPress Experts In Your Locality

As they are passionate about WordPress and have long experience, request them to spread the word or ask for suggestions if they have any plan to promote WordPress.

8. Invite With Local Universities Or Educational Institute

Reach out to the IT department or club of the local institute and invite them to attend the meetup. It could be helpful and eye-opening for students and potential users.

9. Utilize The Meetup.com Message Feature

Request your existing member to join and share your event with their friends and colleagues. Using the Meetup.com ‘Contact Members‘ feature, you can easily send emails to current members of your meetup chapter.

10. Turn Attendees Into WordPress Ambassadors

Your attendees liked your event enough to register in the first place and they are the most passionate advocates of WordPress. So, it should be easier to convince them to spread the news and become WordPress Ambassadors.

Questions?

Contact the Community Team, or come join the conversation in the #community-events channel in the Making WP Slack!

Are you a Meetup or WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer and have more tips for promoting WordPress events? Please share your ideas in the comments!

#meetups, #tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Trainings: Should I start a new meetup or join an existing one that is fairly close to me?

If there’s a question you’d like to see answered, or a topic you’d like to see discussed, please share it in the comments or email support@wordcamp.org with the subject line “Tuesday Trainings”. Now onto this week’s topic!

WordPress meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. groups are locally-organized groups that meet on a regular basis (at least once a month) to share their WordPress experiences and knowledge. Every WordPress meetup group is mostly* based in individual cities and towns all over the world. At the time of writing, there are 755 WordPress Meetup groups in 111 countries!

*Before the pandemic, meetup groups were meeting in person, but these days, most Meetup events are online. Since events have been largely online lately, we’ve been seeing topic based Meetup groups forming.

If you’re interested in joining a WordPress meetup group in your area, the best place to start is at the WordPress Meetup Pro page. You can browse the map, or search for your location under “Search WordPress”.

Frequently asked questions

Q1: There is a WordPress meetup group in my city, but I want to have a different kind of meetup, or meet at a different day/time. Can I start a new meetup group?

A: Reach out to the organizers of the WordPress chapter meetup group in your area! Organizers are encouraged to have a team of co-organizers, as this brings different perspectives to the group and builds community. The group should ideally host a variety of meetup types, hosted by different folks on a variety of days, in different parts of town! As stated in the Five Good Faith Rules of WordPress chapter meetups, WordPress meetup groups should allow events to be organized by any reliable and trusted member of their community.

Q2: There is a meetup group in my area, but they have not had an event in a long time, and the group seems inactive.

A: We can work together to revive the group! In some cases, the organizing team may intend on keeping the group active and continue organizing events. But that doesn’t mean that you cannot offer to organize events as well! Contact the local organizers to offer your help in organizing some upcoming events. In the case that the current organizers are no longer interested in organizing, you can still proceed with the process to become an organizer in the chapter group by submitting an application.

Q3: I cannot find any meetup groups located nearby — can I start a meetup group?

A: It depends! If the closest group is located in the city or town you live in, get in touch with the organizing team of that group to discuss joining their team so you can organize events in your neighborhood (see Q4 below). If there is not a meetup group that is based in your city or town, you can apply to start a new group (see Q5 and the “Apply to start a new meetup group” section below).

Q4: The meetup group in my city or town usually meets at a location that is too inconvenient for me to get to. What should I do?

A: The chapter program aims to have a single meetup group per local community, ideally with multiple organizers that work together as a team to foster their local WordPress community. A group does not have to always meet in the same location — as mentioned in Q1, a meetup group should ideally host a variety of meetup types, hosted by different folks on a variety of days, in different parts of town! Talk to the organizing team of the group in your city or town if you are interested in hosting an event in a location that is more convenient for you.

Q5: There is a meetup group that is located near me, but it is not in the city or town that I live in. Can I start a new meetup group where I live?

A: Yes — if there isn’t a meetup group where you live and you want to start a new group there, you may apply to organize one! See the “Apply to start a new meetup group” section below. You can of course continue to attend events with the group in the location near to you to keep involved in the WordPress community.

Q6: If my local meetup group is hosting events in person, does the group need to offer a live stream so people can join online? Also, can I join online meetup events that are not based in my area?

A: No, meetup groups are not obligated to offer a live stream of their events. However, it can be highly appreciated by the local community if organizers can provide a live stream or recording. As a bonus, you may meet more folks in your community that may usually not be able to attend in person! To answer the second question, you are welcome to attend online meetup events that are not based in your area.

Apply to start a new meetup group

If you are ready to apply to start a new meetup group, fill out the meetup interest form. Community Team deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. will review your application, and if your application is approved, we will help you set up a new group for your community and make you the first organizer.

If you already organize a meetup group, but are not using meetup.com and you’d like to, use the same form. But in this case, make sure to include the URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org for your existing group’s online presence (e.g., Facebook, independent site, etc.).

More questions?

Contact the Community Team, or come join the conversation in the #community-events channel in the Making WP Slack!

Thank you to @tacoverdo for contributing to this post!

#tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Trainings: What are profile badges, and how do I get one?

If there’s a question you’d like to see answered, or a topic you’d like to see discussed, please share it in the comments or email support@wordcamp.org with the subject line “Tuesday Trainings”. Now onto this week’s topic!

What is a profile badge?

If you look at any contributor’s profile page on WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/, you’ll notice that they have colorful badges on their profile, as seen in the image below. These badges represent their contributions to WordPress.

Image of Courtney P.K.'s profile on WordPress.org, showing her various contributor badges.

You can view your own profile by following this link (requires login to WordPress.org)!

What do the different Community Team badges mean?

I’m glad you asked. 🙂 The Community Team has many ways to contribute, and there are badges to indicate those contributions.

Community Team profile badge. It is a blue icon of a group of people, surrounded by a circle. The inside of the circle is filled with a light blue tint.

The Community Team badge will be manually assigned to all Community DeputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. who have been active for at least 6 months (active deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. are listed on this page). You can find out more about the DeputyDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. program (and how to get involved) in the Community Deputy handbook.

Community Contributor profile badge. It is a blue icon of a group of people, surrounded by a circle.

The Community Contributor badge will be manually assigned to all WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. MentorsMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues., as well as those who provide valuable contributions to the Community Team. Mentors are all listed as “MentorMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues.” on the Community Deputies list. In the future, mentors will be auto-assigned this badge when they begin mentoring their first WordCamp (removing the manual administration side of things). You can find out more about the WordCamp Mentorship program in this previous Tuesday Trainings post, or in the Deputy handbook.

Meetup Organizer profile badge. It is a yellow icon of a name tag, surrounded by a circle.

The MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. Organizer badge is auto-assigned to all members of Meetup organizing teams for meetup groups in the official chapter program. The list of WordPress.org usernames for each meetup group is manually updated by Community Deputies.

WordCamp Organizer profile badge.  It is a yellow icon of a pair of tickets, surrounded by a circle.

The WordCamp Organizer badge is auto-assigned to all members of WordCamp organizing teams, provided their WordPress.org username is added to their ‘Organizer’ post on any WordCamp.org website.

WordCamp Speaker profile badge. It is a yellow icon of a megaphone surrounded by a circle.

The WordCamp Speaker badge is auto-assigned to all WordCamp speakers, provided their WordPress.org username is added to their ‘Speaker’ post on any WordCamp.org website.

What about badges for other teams?

All the other contributor teams have badges specific to them, and there are two types of badges: Contributor and Team. What’s the difference between the two?

Contributor badges are assigned to anyone who has contributed to a particular team. Team badges are assigned to contributors that are currently active on that team. You can view the descriptions and criteria for each badge over on Meta.

I think my profile is missing a Community badge, what do I do?

Community Team or Community Contributor badges are manually assigned to contributors and usually need to be requested, as the system doesn’t allow us to add the badge to your profile until a request is submitted. To make a request, please go to the Community Team or Community Contributor pages and request membership for the group. Community Deputies will then review/approve the request. Since this process is manual, the change may take a short time to complete.

WordCamp Organizer, WordCamp Speaker, and Meetup Organizer badges are automatically assigned based on contributor status. As long as you have your WordPress.org username in your WordCamp Organizer or Speaker profile, or the Meetup Tracker, the badge should appear automatically.

Note that there is a known bug that has caused WordCamp Organizer and Speaker badges to mysteriously disappear from profiles (this bug can be tracked on Meta). If this has happened to you, try the following if you have the ability to edit the Speaker (or Organizer) profile on the WordCamp’s site:

  1. Remove your WordPress.org username from the Speaker (or Organizer) profile, then save.
  2. Add your username back in and save again.
  3. Refresh your profile page—your badge should re-appear like magic!

If you do not have the ability to try the above steps for WordCamp Speaker and Organizer badges, or they did not work, please contact the Community Team so a deputy can assist you further. Please be sure to include your WordPress.org username, as well as the WordCamp city and year that you organized for.

If you are listed as Meetup organizer on your chapter meetup group, and your profile page does not have the Meetup Organizer badge, contact the Community Team. Please include the URLURL A specific web address of a website or web page on the Internet, such as a website’s URL www.wordpress.org of your meetup group and your WordPress.org username.

For both of these cases, Community Team deputies can be reached at support@wordcamp.org, and please include “Profile badges” in the subject line.

Display your profile badges with pride, and thank you for all your great contributions!

#tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Trainings: How can I recruit organizers for my Meetup or WordCamp?

If there’s a question you’d like to see answered, or a topic you’d like to see discussed, please share it in the comments or email support@wordcamp.org with the subject line “Tuesday Trainings”. Now onto this week’s topic!

Organizing a WordPress MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. group or WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. can be a lot of work! If you want to grow and develop your local WordPress community, you will need others around you to help. But how do you find the right people to join your organizing team?

Meetup Organizers

As stated in the Five Good Faith Rules, WordPress chapter meetup groups allow events to be organized by any reliable and trusted member of their community. Reliable and trusted community members:

  • Actively participate in meetup events
  • Help without being asked
  • Are team players — they are constantly around and dependable
  • May be the first to arrive and the last to leave an event
  • May be interested in organizing meetup events around their area of interest and/or expertise in WordPress

Potential quality team members may not always be the loudest, most outgoing person. Keep an eye out for the quiet achievers who are loyal and regular attendees of your meetup events — they could be quietly encouraged to take on an organizing role!

It is expected that all Meetup co-organizers agree with the principles in the same Five Good Faith Rules that you also agreed to when you became an organizer.

WordCamp Organizers

Your WordCamp organizing team should consist of people from your immediate area who want to promote WordPress and help grow the local community. Members of a WordCamp organizing team can come from:

  • Your meetup group’s co-organizers
  • Active members of your local meetup group
  • Businesses that are built on working with WordPress
  • Local bloggers using WordPress

But of course, it is not limited to the above! The most important things to remember while forming your organizing team: Recruit from your local community, and distribute the organizing responsibilities. Too few people handling too many things leads to things getting missed, and/or people getting burned out!

It is expected that all WordCamp organizing team members and volunteers agree with the principles in the Agreement among WordCamp Organizers, Speakers, Sponsors, and Volunteers.

Representing WordPress

Remember that organizers are representing WordPress in an official capacity. When representing WordPress, one is expected to uphold the principles of the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project, including the GPL. This helps protect the user/attendee, who might not realize that by using a non-GPLGPL GPL is an acronym for GNU Public License. It is the standard license WordPress uses for Open Source licensing https://wordpress.org/about/license/. The GPL is a ‘copyleft’ license https://www.gnu.org/licenses/copyleft.en.html. This means that derivative work can only be distributed under the same license terms. This is in distinction to permissive free software licenses, of which the BSD license and the MIT License are widely used examples. pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party or theme, they are giving away the rights that WordPress provides them.

Want to learn more?

Here is some recommended reading:

Questions?

Contact the Community Team, or come join the conversation in the #community-events channel in the Making WP Slack!

Are you a Meetup or WordCamp organizer and have more tips for recruiting an organizing team? Please share your ideas in the comments!

#community-team, #tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Trainings: What is the WordCamp Mentorship program and how does it work?

If there’s a question you’d like to see answered, or a topic you’d like to see discussed, please share it in the comments or email support@wordcamp.org with the subject line “Tuesday Trainings”. Now onto this week’s topic!

Previously, we learned all about Community Deputies and what they do, which includes mentoring WordCamps. But what exactly is the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. mentorship program, and how does it work?

What is the WordCamp mentorship program?

The WordCamp mentorship program helps make WordCamps easier to plan for organizers, and better for attendees! This is done by providing peer support to folks actively organizing a WordCamp.

Who are the WordCamp MentorsMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues.?

WordCamp mentors are Community team deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. who are also experienced WordCamp organizers. You can see the current roster of mentors on the Community Deputies page.

What do WordCamp Mentors do?

WordCamp mentors support other organizers as they plan their WordCamp! Their involvement should be advising on procedure and sharing of knowledge based on the mentorMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues.’s history organizing WordCamps. Note that mentors are not on the WordCamp’s organizing team, so they shouldn’t be doing any actual organizing tasks.

Mentors help a lead organizer keep their team on schedule by checking in every month during the pre-planning process, and typically every 2 weeks during active planning to make sure everything is going as planned.

Mentors are hopefully able to help organizers avoid problems before they become problems. They are expected to check in frequently with their WordCamp(s), and also keep up to date on new tools, developments, and decisions made by the Community Team that impact WordCamp organizers.

How do I get involved with the WordCamp mentorship program?

Any WordCamp organizer with experience and who is in good standing with the WordPress events program can be a WordCamp mentor. To learn more about being a WordCamp Mentor, you can check out the deputy handbook and take the WordCamp mentor self-training course. When you’re ready, go ahead and submit an application!

If you are currently a WordCamp organizer and feel like you would benefit from mentorship, check out the handbook page on mentors, and submit a request for a mentor.

Want to Learn More?

Want to learn even more? Come join our conversations in the #community-events or #community-team channels in the Making WP Slack.

#community-team, #mentors, #mentorship, #tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Training: How to re-activate an inactive Meetup group

Are you a WordPress enthusiast and would like to attend a MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. event in your city?
If the answer is yes, great!  The next step is to check the official chapter program of WordPress Meetups to see if there is already an existing group in your town/city.

If there is not an existing WordPress Meetup group, you can follow these steps and apply to start organizing a new WordPress Meetup group in your city.

But… What if there is an existing Meetup group in your city, but it hasn’t been active for months?

Once every 6-12 months, the WordPress Global Community TeamGlobal Community Team A group of community organizers and contributors who collaborate on local events about WordPress — monthly WordPress meetups and/or annual conferences called WordCamps. deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. try to contact the organizers of inactive groups (no events in the past 6 months) to see if they are still planning to organize events in the future. Deputies also help find a new organizer in the case no organizer has such a plan.

If you’re checking a group, and you find something like this:

Meetup group with no upcoming events

Past events of a Meetup group

If the group has not had any event in recent months, and you’d love to share your interest in the group and/or you’re willing to help with organizing more events, these would be the next steps:

  1. Contact the current organizers

The first step would be to contact the current organizers and to share with them your interest in seeing more events. All organizers of Meetup groups are volunteers and you’ll help their motivation if they discover that there are people interested in the meetup! Many times, organizers lose their incentive when they don’t see interest from the members of the group.


So, sending them a message, letting them know that you’re interested in the group, that you’d love to see more events, and even better, that you’re willing to help them with the organization (topic, speaker, etc.), is enough, in most cases, to reactivate the group.

Where to find the list of organizers of a WordPress Meetup group
  1. Apply to become an organizer of the existing inactive Meetup group: 

Perhaps you have contacted the current organizers of the group already and you didn’t hear back from them, or they replied to you letting you know that they’re no longer interested in being organizers of the group. 

In that case, a possible next step is to apply to become an organizer of that existing group (if you’re interested in organizing meetup events).

  1. Read carefully the WordPress Meetup Program Basics to see if you are aligned with the values and philosophy of the project (Pay special attention to the sections “What does it take to be an organizer?” and “The Five Good Faith Rules”).
  2. If after reading, you’re enthusiastic about reactivating the existing Meetup group and you’d love to help organize Meetup events, read the guidelines and submit your application following the link at the end of that page. A community deputyDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. will then vet your application and be in touch.
Meetup Organizer Handbook: Form to apply to become an organizer
  1. Start organizing events!

Remember that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most WordPress events are online. Please refer to our online events handbook.

For communities where COVID-19 has been more effectively contained or have access to COVID-19 vaccination and/or testing, returning to hosting an in-person meetup event is possible, with caution, using the resources provided.

If you plan to move forward with an in-person meetup, you must use the provided checklist.       

  1. Building and growing your Meetup group:
    Now that you’re an organizer of the group and you’ve re-activated it, don’t forget that it’s important to find new organizers, the more, the merrier. That way, the activity of the group will not depend only on your shoulders or on a very small group of people.

    Check our resources to create and build your team of organizers and to create a diverse and inclusive group of enthusiastic WordPress lovers!


And now it’s your turn! Give me your opinion in the comments and/or answer the following questions:

  1. Do you have any questions about this process?
  2. Am I missing any steps or edge cases that you’d like to mention or ask about?


Don’t hesitate to become a new organizer just because there is an existing group. Chances are, other community members are also waiting for the group to become active again 🙂

Thanks for reading and hope this has been helpful! 🙂 

#tuesdaytrainings

Tuesday Trainings: Why no one gets paid for organizing WordPress events?

Did you know that the almost 800 WordPress MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. groups and (in the pre-pandemic world) a few hundred WordCamps are all organised on a fully voluntary basis?

That means organisers are committing to use their own time to make the events happen. That’s a huge amount of hours contributed to our WordPress Community and project every year!

Quick math: organizing one meetup takes at least 30 minutes of preparation and the meetup itself usually lasts at least one hour. In 2019 there were over 6,000 meetup events across the world. The overly conservative estimation is that meetup organisers (who are community members just like you!) contributed at least 9,000 hours in total for making the meetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. happen. To put it into context, 9,000 hours equals over a year.

Why doesn’t WordPress Community pay for organizing the events?

Clearly, that is a lot of hours of unpaid work. So why do community members choose to contribute to the project? Why doesn’t WordPress Community Support PBCWordPress Community Support WordPress Community Support PBC is a subsidiary of WordPress Foundation. It is created specifically to be the financial and legal support for WordCamps, WordPress Meetup groups, and any additional “official” events organized within the WordPress Community Events program. pay any compensation for that time?

One reason is that, while there aren’t financial benefits, there are other benefits to contributing that time. @andreamiddleton wrote an excellent post in 2019 on what organisers get for all their hard work. She outlined four main “gets” as: making an impact, opportunities for personal growth, learning new things, and getting support and protection from the Community team. In the comments, @davelo shared that getting friends and making connections is a very important “get” for organisers as well.

I think that post covers very well why community contributors are choosing to spend their valuable free time towards the WordPress events. Some might still ask, shouldn’t we nonetheless compensate for the time used in some way? There are few main reasons why we don’t do that.

One of the neat things about the WordPress Community team is that anyone can organize a WordPress event. Even if you don’t have any event organizing experience, that’s ok! This is a great place to get that, and community building experience. One of the main requirements of WordPress event organizers, however, is enthusiasm for bringing people together around WordPress. The Community team will help cover expenses related to event organizing, like venue costs or Zoom, but the main motivation of event organizers is community-driven, not financially driven.  

Another amazing thing about WordPress is how many people are able to build their livelihood through WordPress. Because of this, the WordPress community wants to make events as accessible to as many people as possible – this community literally changes lives! This is why WordPress meetups are free to attend and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. ticket prices are kept intentionally low. Relying on volunteer work to help create great communities and keeping expenses as low as possible, enables the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project to have an even greater reach.

Surely someone is getting paid?!

I know, at this point you are probably thinking “I’m quite sure someone is getting paid”. And that’s partially true, but not as simple as someone might think at first. Let me explain.

The community team is very lucky to have sponsored contributors. Some of them are sponsored full time, while most are sponsored to contribute a few hours weekly or monthly. They receive their paycheck from their employers, not from WordPress Community Support PBC (sometimes referred to as “WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each.”) or the WordPress FoundationWordPress Foundation The WordPress Foundation is a charitable organization founded by Matt Mullenweg to further the mission of the WordPress open source project: to democratize publishing through Open Source, GPL software. Find more on wordpressfoundation.org.. Companies are donating their talents time as part of the Five for the Future initiative.

The majority of the work of sponsored contributors is supporting our local communities and volunteer organisers to make the best out of their community, doing administrative work to keep things running and money flowing as well as facilitating conversations between volunteer contributors. Sometimes sponsored contributors do help to organise events, from local meetups to flagship WordCamps. To put it in a nutshell, sponsored contributors are supporting the communities when needed and crunching mundane tasks to allow local organisers to focus on benefitting their community the most.

And as always if you have any questions or topics you’d like to see addressed in this space let us know in the comments or by emailing support@wordcamp

Thanks to @angelasjin who helped with this post.

#tuesdaytrainings