Logos in Slide Decks and WordCamp Videos

A while ago, there was a discussion about the use of logos in slide decks and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. videos. A consensus was reached as to what the permitted guidelines should be, but this was never documented in the handbook and has not been made clear to both organisers and speakers.

So, to bring that discussion full circle, here is how the discussion concluded regarding logos appearing in WordCamp videos:

  1. Speakers are allowed to include their company logo in their slides, but only in an optional opening/closing informational slide and not throughout the presentation. This is fine even if their company is not a sponsor of the event.
  2. Sponsor logos at the venue (banners, podium, etc.) that are captured on video are fine to leave in the published video.
  3. Similarly, a speaker can wear clothing with their company logo on it, even if their company is not a sponsor.
  4. No company logos of any kind are to be added in post-production. This includes the speaker’s company, event sponsors, the post-production company, or any other company logos.

With that in mind, we now have two additional pages in the handbook – one for speakers with the full slide deck guidelines and one for organisers specifically focussing on what can be included in videos.

Going forward, all organisers will be expected to ensure that speakers follow these guidelines with their slides. You can do this by making them aware of the guidelines and vetting their slides before the event.

This rule will apply from today only, so it will not affect to any videos filmed before today (Monday, 8 April 2019).


UPDATES FROM THE COMMENTS:

The intention of these new rules was clarified:

To clarify the intention here – this isn’t to stop companies from gaining exposure (that happens naturally when someone is speaking), but rather to make the content the main focus and intent of the slides rather than any kind of company promotion. It’s also worth noting that WordCamp speakers are chosen based on their knowledge and experience as individuals and not their company affiliation, and company promotion throughout a slide deck suggests that the opposite is true. An informational slide with the speaker’s company makes sense as information about who is speaking, but the rest of the slide deck should be dedicated to the content being presented.

A few other points were clarified from questions:

  1. “Logo” also includes plain text names of the company and social media handles.
  2. Personal names are fine to include on every slide if you wish, even if you are a freelancer and your name is your “brand”.
  3. These rules do not (currently) apply to presentations at meetups.
  4. Contextual mentions of your (or any) company are still fine as they will be a part of the talk content, which is what this rule is designed to enhance.

#speakers

WordCamp Talks Beta

I’m happy to announce that the BetaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. of the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Talks pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party is on GitHubGitHub GitHub is a website that offers online implementation of git repositories that can can easily be shared, copied and modified by other developers. Public repositories are free to host, private repositories require a paid subscription. GitHub introduced the concept of the ‘pull request’ where code changes done in branches by contributors can be reviewed and discussed before being merged be the repository owner. https://github.com/ and ready for testing, feedback, feature requests and PRs! \o/

https://github.com/imath/wordcamp-talks/releases/tag/1.0.0-beta1

This first step in the process forked the WP Idea Stream plugin and integrated the WordCamp-specific features previously grouped in an external file.

Reminder: our goal is to create a plugin for WordCamp sites that manages talk submissions and selections (similar to OpenCFP), integrating seamlessly with the existing Speaker post type (on the to do list).

Ref : https://make.wordpress.org/community/2016/05/11/wp-idea-stream-for-the-wordcamp-admin-toolbox/

All credit for current efforts goes to @imath, I’m just the messenger 🙂

#speakers, #toolkit, #wordcamps

@obenland you were going to spearhead a project…

@obenland: you were going to spearhead a project to do blanket releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. forms for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. speakers. Any progress there?

While I have speaker forms on my mind, @andreamiddleton: the upcoming usenix conference has a nice general speaker consent form that combines general policy agreement with a/v release. Maybe something we could do as well?

#consent-form, #speakers, #wordcamps

Hi could we merge two Speakers categories http…

Hi, could we merge two Speakers categories: http://wordpress.tv/speakers/hristo-pandjarov/ and http://wordpress.tv/speakers/hristo-pandzharov/. Hristo asked me if we could use “hristo-pandjarov” for both videos. I think I used the wrong one – “hristo-pandzharov” for one of the scheduled videos from WordCamp Sofia 2013, so probably there also should have to be changed. Thanks in advance! 🙂

#speakers, #wordpress-tv

Women Speakers at WordCamps

One of the things we’ve worked on in the past year is trying to increase diversity in the project, starting with gender. We’ve reached out to more women about contributing, we participated in the Gnome Outreach Program for Women, and we taught workshops for women both on our own and at events like the Grace Hopper Conference Open SourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. Day. Cool! One of the things we talked about doing but never did was putting something together for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers on having more women speakers — why it’s important, why it won’t magically happen just because you include the line “women encouraged to apply” in your call for speakers, and how to do the (hard yet underrated) work of increasing diversity on your speaker rolls. I’m sad to say that our lack of attention there shows. I’ve tallied up the speaker numbers from the past two years, and we’ve just barely moved the needle.

A note about these stats: They are not perfect, because some events didn’t post all their speakers, or in a couple of cases any, since they posted things to an external site. Moving forward we will make sure to tell WC organizers to use the speaker listings built in to the WC site so that we will have consistent speaker data. In cases where I didn’t already know the gender of a speaker or couldn’t tell based on a combination of picture/profile/pronouns in bio, I asked the organizer or someone else who was there to let me know the speaker gender.

2012 Percentage of Women Speakers at WordCamps

  • Surveyed 66 WordCamps.
  • Lowest: 0% women
  • Highest: 47% women
  • Mean: 19% women
  • Median: 19.5% women
  • Mode: 3-way tie (4 events each), 0% & 25% & 29% women

2013 Percentage of Women Speakers at WordCamps

  • Surveyed 69 WordCamps.
  • Lowest: 0% women
  • Highest: 50% women
  • Mean: 21% women
  • Median: 21% women
  • Mode: 2-way tie (6 events each), 0% & 25% women

So the overall numbers didn’t improve too much. We should really get to work on that guide this year. Any volunteers?

What’s even more disappointing is that in looking at each event’s speaker lists, I saw a number of WordCamps that went from decent percentages in 2012 to dismal percentages in 2013, and a lot of the ones with dismal numbers had a high percentage of “circuit” speakers — folks that speak at WordCamps all over the place, often giving the same talk. This is a touchy subject, and I don’t want to dive into it right now — we have enough touchy subjects on the docket already — but it’s something to think about.

Note: For the sake of this I went binary based on the people we had on stage. My gut tells me that in 2014 we will have some speakers who identify as trans in a non-binary way, so moving forward will look at gender in a slightly different way.

#speakers, #wordcamps, #diversity