Recent profile badge changes

If you are a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer, Community Deputy or a WordCamp Mentor, then you would have noticed a recent change to the badges that you see on your WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile. To clear up any confusion, this post provides an explanation about what has happened here. This ticket outlines the decisions made, but here’s a breakdown of it all in an easily digestible format.

Up until now, the Community Team had two badges related to it: The Community Team badge and the WordCamp Speaker badges. The Team badge used the standard Community icon with a plain white background, and the Speaker badge used the standard Speaker icon. The Team badge was automatically assigned to all WordCamp organizers and then could also be assigned manually to anyone involved in the team.

Going forward we have made a few changes to this system for two main reasons:

  1. We want to bring the Community badges in line with the structure of the other teams.
  2. We want the badges to correctly reflect people’s involvement in the Community Team.

With that in mind, here are the Community badges that you will see on your profiles:

Community Team

The Community Team badge will be manually assigned to all active Community Deputies – i.e those who are listed as “Active” on this page. You can find out more about the Deputy program (and how to get involved) here.

Community Contributor

The Community Contributor badge will be manually assigned to all WordCamp Mentors, as well as those who provide valuable contributions to the Community Team. Mentors are all listed as “Active (mentor only)” on this page. In the future, mentors will be auto-assigned this badge when they begin mentoring their first WordCamp (removing the manual administration side of things). You can find out more about the WordCamp Mentorship program here. In the future, we will also assign this badge to meetup group organizers once have established an automated way of doing it.

WordCamp Organizer

The WordCamp Organizer badge is now distinct from the Community Contributor badge so that you can more immediately see what an individual’s contribution to the team is. The chosen icon represents WordCamps directly and gives us a way to recognize all of the amazing WordCamp organizers around the world more effectively. This badge is auto-assigned to all members of WordCamp organizing teams.

WordCamp Speaker

The WordCamp Speaker badge remains exactly the same as before – it is auto-assigned to all WordCamp speakers to recognize their valuable contribution to the community.


We hope that with these changes, we will be able to more correctly recognize all of the work that so many people do to grow the WordPress community all around the world.

#badges #profiles

Proposal: Badges for bbPress, BuddyPress, and GlotPress contributors and teams

Now that w.org profiles have had badges for most of the various WordPress coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. related projects I’m proposing that we now add badges for both contributors and teams of each of the bbPressbbPress Free, open source software built on top of WordPress for easily creating forums on sites. https://bbpress.org., BuddyPress, and GlotPress projetcs. We already include TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. activity from each of these projects in the activity section of each w.org profile, e.g. @mercime so this seems like a natural progression for WordPress’ sister projects.

Are there any objections or concerns here that I may not have considered or anyone against this addition?

Previous make/community profile discussions can be read here.

#profiles

Profiles

You may have notices that the new profile design has slowly started making it’s way onto the live servers. Please note that it’s getting on there a little at a time, so please don’t start creating tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. tickets to fix things, since chances are the thing you’re reporting just hasn’t been deployedDeploy Launching code from a local development environment to the production web server, so that it's available to visitors. yet. We’ll do a big public announcement when we’ve got the full design in place and a solid v1 backend working properly. Thanks!

#official-websites, #profiles

Remember when we talked about adding the ‘origin…

Remember when we talked about adding the ‘origin story’ to the profiles? You can get a jump on the go-live date and pre-fill yours if you like. Go to https://profiles.wordpress.org/yourusernamehere/profile/edit/group/1/ and scroll to the bottom to get to the field.

#community-management, #profiles

The activity stream in profiles now has the…

The activity stream in profiles now has the updated data fields (posts on make blogs, additional tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. activity, wc speakers, etc). Note that while we are backfilling all the old WC speaker info, it’s showing up as new activity because that activity is based on pub date. So on my profile, for example, the most recent item is “Confirmed as a speaker for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Portland 2010, 7 hours ago” because @camikaos entered those old PDX speakers earlier today.

#profiles

Profiles: A Sketch

Thank you to everyone who’s been leaving comments and suggestions on the thread from yesterday, and keep adding to that thread, I’ll be bookmarking it for continual review. 🙂 Anyway, here’s an update on this project.

This week Ian Dunn and Scott Reilly have been cranking out code, testing, hunting for the bugs, re-testing, etc. Mel Choyce and I have had our heads together on design, and Andrea Middleton and Cami Kaos have been heads down with volunteers on backfilling the WordCamp.org data for speakers and organizers*. We plan to launch something today, but it will definitely be a v1, and I’m proposing we (being whoever wants to work on it moving forward, not necessarily this specific group of people) work on iterations in 2-week cycles moving forward so that improvements (even small ones) are continually making the profiles better.

The way I’m looking at profiles from a ux perspective is that for a visitor, the profile serves as someone’s WP resume, while for the profile owner, it serves as the dashboard for their involvement in the open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project. Based on that, here are the requirements for design:

  • No one’s profile should look sad and lonely because they are new to the project or currently inactive.
  • Seeing someone else’s profile should do the same thing as WordCamps, and help with the goal of our informal 3-word catchphrase (inspire*connect*contribute).
  • The first look when you land on a page should give you a sense of who someone is, and what their involvement level is.
  • It should be easy to see involvement by area/tasks, collections of things, activity in any part of wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/. Including both a big-river activity stream and breakout views would be the base of this, with an infinitely extensibleExtensible This is the ability to add additional functionality to the code. Plugins extend the WordPress core software. UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. to allow for adding more areas of activity as we start to connect them to the central profile.
  • Recognize contributors who are part of recognized contributor teams with a curated badge (vs pure quantity generating: imagine a forum volunteer and a spammy commenter/questioner both getting a badge saying they’re on the support team based on their activity numbers — yuck!). We’ll have to come up with a transparent metric for deciding what level/frequency of activity makes someone a ‘team member’ vs a contributor in that area. I’ll start checking in with each team and ask the team reps to help wrangle those decisions on a team-by-team basis.

So here’s the sketch I did yesterday for Ian to use as the starting point. Please take this in the spirit it’s offered; it’s just the working sketch/a set of ideas, and we’ll wind up with whatever we wind up with and then continue to iterate. So try not to get hung up on specifics yet. 🙂

Jen's sketch of profiles redux project v1

Jen’s sketch of profiles redux project v1

  • The top part serves as an overview for the person. Picture and user info is in the upper left, while the upper right is available for badges and special designations (like in this fake-nacin example, a custom status might say “Lead Developer” above the badges). If there is no activity, the picture and metadata will look like a nice digital business card with some lovely white space rather than a gaping, empty maw. Note it includes the join date that people have added from the forum profile, as well as more social media links, swiped from gravatarGravatar Is an acronym for Globally Recognized Avatar. It is the avatar system managed by WordPress.com, and used within the WordPress software. https://gravatar.com/. profiles. The badges are going to be done using dashicons on colored circle backgrounds to keep the wp logo branding style in play. Note: WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. speakers will be included in this, but the giant backlog of missing and/or nonexistent usernames will mean it takes a while to get those caught up.
  • The stats bar below the top will likely be v2 (esp since Scott is leaving today), but the idea is that it would highlight your areas of greatest activity/contribution. So if we identified say 20 potential stats that could go there, someone might have 5, or 3, or 10, or however many depending on how spread out their activity is. There would be no empty/0 counts. Someone with lots of docs activity would have different stats showing that someone who’s mostly in coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. or WordCamps, for example. We talked about doing a cool graph or visual treatment, but we’ll consider that again later based on availability of people to make something like that.
  • Below the stat bar is the main content area. Here’s where it diverges — this sketch is layout A, which uses a left-hand nav/psuedo-tab approach to swap out the content in the main area. This is the layout I’m working on. Mel is working with Layout B, which has the same top part, but instead of separate sections to click on below, will put all the activity in one long screen. We’re going to use the same information/data and styling for both so that we can do a little A/B testing to see which layout approach people think is better/easier to use.

Some of the bits of data in the sketch don’t exist yet, but we’re going to work on adding them. The stats bar may have to wait until v2 for timing reasons. I’m pretty excited, though, and I think this will be a great improvement over what we have now. Look for a status update by the end of today or tomorrow at latest. Thanks!

*I spent a couple of hours doing this data backfill and it is TERRIBLE having to search all over google to find usernames and try them out only to find that really prominent people in the community who’ve spoken at multiple WCs don’t have a wordpress.org account at all. Makes me even more itchy for the next WC project, to have people log in/register at wordpress.org to buy a ticket, apply to speak, etc.

#official-websites, #profiles

Profiles: How Do You Use Them (or Want To?)

Hi all. As you know we’re working on a profiles update, and given all the new stuff it’ll include, it’ll get some new design as well. We’re trying to figure out what is most important to show in the default view, how to categorize sections/views, and in terms of layout, how to structure it so that no one’s profile looks like crap if they haven’t participated in much of anything yet. To that end, if you have a minute, can you comment with the answers to these questions? If you have time to ask some people you know and get their input as well, go for it. Thanks!

  • When you go to a wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile, what are you looking for? If you go for multiple things, which are most important to you?
  • Is there information we don’t currently show in our profiles that you would find helpful?
  • Currently we have sections for Activity Stream (temporal information) and several “collections” of a person’s stuff (plugins and themes they’ve authored, plugins they’ve favorited, etc). Changes to items in a collection show up in the activity stream as well, but the collections are not tied to a temporal display. Does stream + collections make sense, or should the collection items just be part of the stream, or should they be separate but on the same view based on type, or do you have any other ideas on whether this distinction is useful or irrelevant? Any thoughts or ideas are worth sharing here.
  • Feel free to add any other new thoughts on profiles, but be prepared for us not to act on them in this week’s project given the timing. 🙂

Update: If you don’t know how to find the profile I’m talking about, it’s at https://profiles.wordpress.org/yourwordpressdotorgusername 🙂

#profiles

Past WordCamp Organizers: Help!

We’ll need some more hands on deck to get past WC speaker/organizer data squared away for when we do the profiles update later this week. Basically we need to check each WC site on wordcamp.org against a spreadsheet, to see if the number of speakers/sessions/organizers listed on the site is the same as the number listed in the custom post types. When the numbers don’t match, we have to go into the site and copy/paste the names into the CPTs.

Pure drudgery, but you can do it while binge-watching Veronica Mars in preparation for the movie next month, or over a glass of wine with a friend (or while idly chatting in our IRC channel or on a hangout?). Due to the all-access nature of this work, this is limited to past WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers/volunteers who helped maintain a WC site in the past. Volunteer in the comments to sign up and get instructions emailed to you.

Thanks!

#profiles

Profiles Work v1

We will not be talking about this in today’s meeting, just wanted to post a progress report.

Activity Streams

Scott has been working on this, with Ian doing the part for WordCamps.

These things are currently tracked in the activity stream:

  • Support Forums – new topic or reply (for poster)
  • Ideas – new ideas or replies (for poster)
  • TracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. – new ticket (for ticket creator)
  • Trac – closed ticket (for ticket closer)
  • Trac – reopened ticket (for ticket reopener)
  • Trac – new commit (for committer)

These things will be added to the activity stream:

  • International Forums – new topic or reply (for poster)
  • Plugins Directory – released a new pluginPlugin A plugin is a piece of software containing a group of functions that can be added to a WordPress website. They can extend functionality or add new features to your WordPress websites. WordPress plugins are written in the PHP programming language and integrate seamlessly with WordPress. These can be free in the WordPress.org Plugin Directory https://wordpress.org/plugins/ or can be cost-based plugin from a third-party (for plugin author)
  • Themes Directory – released a new theme (for theme author)
  • Make P2s – newly published post (for post author)
  • Make P2s – new comment (for commenter)
  • Trac – new comment (for commenter)
  • Trac – new props (for user getting prop’d)
  • WordCamps – new speaker added
  • WordCamps – new organizer added

*Trac entries consist of any of the following tracs: coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress., plugins, themes, buddypress, ios (iphone), bbpressbbPress Free, open source software built on top of WordPress for easily creating forums on sites. https://bbpress.org., metaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. (will be newly added)

Associations

We’re still working out how this will work (thinking BuddyPress groups), but we’ll rig up a form of recognition for involvement in our various contributor groups, for organizing/speaking at WordCamps, etc. There are other bits that we want to include (volunteering at a WC, attending, all things relating to meetups, etc) but will take some more work to create the right infrastructure. In addition to Scott and Ian, we’ve got Jtrip consulting, and Mel and I will be working on design. Re groups we need to stop and think for a few minutes and consider how else we might want to use BP groups (meetups?) so that we don’t create something that backs us into a corner we can’t get out of later.

Timeline

We hope to get the new stream additions in place next week, and if we’re really lucky, a v1 for associations as well. Once we see what we’re working with, we can work up a plan with a schedule for what comes next. The Automattic dot org team (which includes me, Andrea, Cami, and Ian among others) is having a team meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. next week, and Mel and Scott will be joining us so that we can try to crank some of this out while we’re in a room together.

#profiles, #recognition

Drudge Work Opportunity

We’re working on v1 of getting WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer/speaker activity onto wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profiles (v2+ would expand this to volunteers, attendees, meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers/speakers/attendees, etc). We’ll be trying to launch (or at least soft-launch) v1 of this next week. To that end, we’ll need to scour the admins of our past WC sites and make sure .org usernames are given in the CPTs for speakers and organizers, and for the WCs that came before the CPTs (or ones where the organizers didn’t use the tool as requested) we’ll need to backfill the speaker info so that those folks’ll get credit. Andrea and Cami will be leading this charge next week (while Mel and I hammer out a UIUI UI is an acronym for User Interface - the layout of the page the user interacts with. Think ‘how are they doing that’ and less about what they are doing. and Ian and Scott make everything work) but we could use a couple of trustworthy and detail-oriented volunteers to help out with this. If interested, leave a comment on this post. Thanks!

#profiles