Discussion: Pro/paid Zoom accounts for Online Meetups

In April 2020, WordPress Community Support (WPCS) began offering the use of Pro accounts on Zoom for special events, such as the Diverse Speaker Training workshop, do_action charity hackathons, or Contributor Days. These accounts are also offered to WordCamps that need them.

For regular chapter meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. events, the Community Team has been recommending the use of free tools, and still recommend the use of these free tools as much as possible. However, I would like to explore the idea of offering the use of these Pro Zoom accounts to WordPress chapter meetup organizers.

When I brought this topic up in the Community Team chat last week, it sparked a lot of discussion, and I’d like to continue that conversation here!

  • While the current process has been working fairly well with special events, it doesn’t seem like it will scale if it is opened up to all meetup groups. What parts of this process can be improved upon and automated?
    • @brandondove asked if we can leverage the Zoom dev APIs to make this a self-service process. What do the devs amongst us think?
  • When we previously discussed community Zoom accounts, a concern that came up was how to handle password management.
    • I have been trying out 1Password Teams for the past month, which I think it would work well for any trusted deputy to be able to manage the passwords (and therefore not dependent on a small group of deputies). 1Password has offered us a non-profit discount after the free trial.
  • @tacoverdo asked a great question: Why do we need Zoom for this? Are there free/open alternatives that don’t require password sharing tools?

Let’s hear what you think!

Mentioning @sippis @jenniferswisher @kcristiano @camikaos as you all participated in the discussion in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. But this discussion is open for everyone’s feedback! 🙂

#meetups, #online-events, #community-management

Tuesday Trainings: Supporting Meetup groups during the pandemic

Many members of our community are stressed due to the challenges brought about by the pandemic. In these difficult times, local meetups can offer a great way to bring members of our community together and to help each other. Since in-person events are not happening these days, more and more WordPress Meetups are going online. In many ways, online meetups are easier to organize than in-person meetups, as they are relatively easy to organize. While many meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. groups across the world have embraced the online meetup format, others are still struggling to hold online events. This post offers tips, tricks, and resources for WordPress meetup organizers worldwide to revitalize their meetup groups during the pandemic with the help of online events. 

Reactivating a meetup group

Many meetup groups have not been able to organize meetups this year, due to the pandemic. A great way to reactivate an inactive group is by merely scheduling a check-in call as a meetup event. It need not even be an actual session – it can just be an informal discussion over a call. If you are an organizer of a group that has not had meetups in a while, try scheduling an online meetup as a casual call. You’d be surprised to see the number of attendees for such an event! Please note: Any meetup event with three or more attendees is considered a meetup, so you need not have tens of attendees to organize a successful meetup event. Our handbook page offers guidance on how to schedule and host an online meetup in Meetup.com. Once the group has a scheduled event, we’ve seen that it really improves the morale of both the organizing team and the group members, and that it really gets things going!

Playing around with Meetup Formats

In our first-ever Tuesday Trainings post, we discussed different online event formats that organizers can try out. The online meetup format offers a lot of possibilities for Meetup organizers. Apart from the suggestions listed in that post, here are a few types of events that you can try with your group: 

  • Organize routine catch-up/check-in calls with the meetup group
    While these calls (with no agenda other than to check-in) can be a great way to reactivate the group, it can also help to provide the kind of social camaraderie that we’ve been missing out on due to COVID-19. Such calls can offer an excellent opportunity to unwind and discuss everything non-work related, and might work well if you schedule them as recurring events (e.g., every third Friday of the month). For example, The WordPress Pune Meetup group has a recurring social call every Friday, that regularly gets a lot of attendees. 
  • Games and fun activities
    You can consider setting some time aside after every meetup to organize some fun activities. It could be anything from collaborating together on an online game, or having a quiz. You could take it a step further to organize an occasional dedicated meetup event (or events) to have these games. While it’s good to have casual games and fun activities for your meetup, please note that the focus your meetup group should still be on WordPress. 🙂 
  • Recurring event series
    Many meetup groups organize recurring event series for their meetup groups. It could be related to specific topics (e.g. Narnia WordPress BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. development event series) or interest groups (Narnia Bloggers Meetup series). As an example, The WordPress NYC Meetup Group has a regular Women of WordPress NYC event series, which holds monthly meetups, providing resources and support for women members.

We recently published a blog post to call for ideas on reimagining online events. Even though the blog post talks about online WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more., you can find many ideas for meetup events in that post.

Finding a topic and a speaker

Many organizers struggle with finding speakers and topics for their online meetups. Posting surveys for your Meetup group to find topics that your members would like will help a lot with event planning. You can put up a survey to get suggestions from members, OR you could list topics, and ask members to vote. Similarly, setting up a poll in your meetup group to get potential speakers is also a good idea to get a list of people that would like to speak at your meetup group. You could ask newer speakers to start with Lightning talks of 10 minutes or super lightning talks (flash talks) of five minutes. It’s also a great way to engage members in your local community and to promote local talent.

Online meetups eliminate geographical restrictions, so you can now get anyone from any part of the world to speak at your meetup! If your Meetup group members want to listen to a session or a workshop on a particular topic, you could reach out to other WordCamp speakers or experts on that topic and invite them to speak at your local meetup. In case you face difficulty finding a speaker for one of your events, you could simply select a talk from WordPress.tv and organize a watch party!

With all that said, you don’t need an expert speaker to speak on a specific topic. Sometimes, experimenting with different event formats such as a panel discussion or merely an informal discussion based on a particular topic, or setting up a co-working session is a great way to engage with your meetup group members. 

Keeping Meetups going

Reactivating a group by organizing online meetup group is only a part of the journey. Organizers would need put in a little more effort to keep the momentum going. The following tips will be helpful:

  • Onboard more co-organizers: Having more members in your organizing team is a great way to help your meetups stay active. Sometimes, existing members of the organizing team may feel fatigued. Newer organizers can step in, when members of the existing organizing team feel tired, so as to keep meetups going.
  • Work with other meetup groups to organize joint events: If there are other meetup groups in your area, you could work with them to jointly organize events. By joining forces with other groups in your area, you tap into a wider audience, thus expanding your community.
  • Bring your community to social media: Feel free to extend your community beyond your Meetup.com page. You can achieve this by aving a presence for your group in other social networks such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. Some meetup groups even have corresponding groups in messaging apps such as WhatsApp and Telegram. If you are comfortable creating and maintaining such groups, you can build connections within your community, and facilitate asynchronous discussions even!
  • Community initiatives: As they stay, communities that work together stay together. Doing recurring activities as a community – such as contributor days and hackathons could be very helpful in engaging members of your community. 

Are you looking for more training content? 

Check these out!

The WordPress Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) has several workshops to help you in your journey to public speaking at online WordPress events, or for WordPress event organizers to support more diverse speakers at your events: 

Tuesday, July 28 & Tuesday, August 18: Who am I to be speaking? & Finding a topic that people would love to hear  

Wednesday, July 29 & Wednesday, August 19: Creating a great pitch
Wednesday

Thursday, July 30: (new!) What if someone asks me a difficult question?

Thursday, August 20: Workshop: Online Stage Presence

Tuesday, August 25, and Thursday, August 26: Open practice sessions.

#meetups, #tuesdaytrainings

Reimagining Online Events

This year, the WordPress Community has faced an unprecedented challenge. In response, we took big steps in moving WordCamps, Meetups, and other community events online, and together, we provided the community with some stability during this global crisis, by bringing the in-person WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. experience online.

Now that we’ve had a number of outstanding online WordCamps, including WordCamp Europe, we have the opportunity to think beyond simply recreating in-person events. 

Instead, we can take this chance to get creative and take our online WordPress events to the next level, exploring how we can transform online events to better serve our community.

Let’s innovate and iterate!

Successful WordPress Community events help people learn to use and contribute to WordPress. Community organizers make this possible by connecting WordPress enthusiasts and inspiring people to do more with WordPress, making it easier for people to contribute to WordPress.

How can we best achieve these goals, advancing the growth and adoption of WordPress, through online events? As an attendee, what would inspire you to participate in an online event?

A few concepts that have been brainstormed by Community deputies include:

  • WordCamp JavaScriptJavaScript JavaScript or JS is an object-oriented computer programming language commonly used to create interactive effects within web browsers. WordPress makes extensive use of JS for a better user experience. While PHP is executed on the server, JS executes within a user’s browser. https://www.javascript.com/.
  • WordCamp Portuguese Online
  • Advanced Developer WordCamp Online, August Edition
  • WordPress 101 Online, Hindi Edition
  • BlockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. Builders Bi-Weekly
  • WordCamp “How It Works”**
  • Documentation Contributor Workshop
  • WordCamp for Non-Profits
  • Content Creators Weekly Round-up

**Wins the prize for worst event title.

Other, broader ideas include: 

  • Decouple online events from geography
  • Encourage events and workshops defined by topics, languages, etc.
  • Explore shorter, “snack-sized” online events
  • Experiment with the frequency of events

Share your ideas 

What can online events make possible for WordPress? What do you think about these ideas, and what other ideas do you have? What online events have impressed you? What online events have been successful in your local community? 

Please share as many ideas as you can, in comments to this post by 17 July, 2020. Community team deputies will then start working on how to support organizers in creating effective and powerful online WordPress events, to be discussed in a follow-up post. 

Thanks to the following deputies for their feedback and contributions to this post: @andreamiddleton, @bph, @camikaos @courtneypk, @harishanker, @hlashbrooke, @kcristiano, @monchomad, @sippis

#meetups, #events-2, #wordcamps

Proposal: Recognition for event volunteers and attendees in WordPress.org profile

About two years ago Meta Trac ticket (note: please don’t continue in that ticket, this P2P2 P2 or O2 is the term people use to refer to the Make WordPress blog. It can be found at https://make.wordpress.org/. is the more correct place for it) was opened about adding a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. volunteer and attendee badges to WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profiles. A few weeks ago Taco did bring it back to the discussion and I promised to write a proposal to move this forward.

Profile badges are graphics that do show users contributions towards WordPress project.

It is suggested that we should:

  • Give a badge for WordCamp volunteers
  • Give a badge for WordCamp attendees
  • Give a badge for MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. attendees

Let’s dive into each badge for a second.

WordCamp volunteers

Technically giving a badge for WordCamp volunteers is probably the most easiest of the badges to give automatically. In coordination with WordCamp MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. team, we could find a way to track all volunteers and their WordPress.org usernames as we do for organisers and speakers too.

It’s also almost unarguable that WordCamp volunteers are contributing to the project, so they should get a badge. In 2017 there was a conversation about recognising volunteers in WordCamp websites, that ended up in conclusion that we should do that. At that time the discussion didn’t consider profile badges and as an end result using Admin Flags functionality was suggested.

WordCamp Attendees

This is technically more harder to do, because we don’t ask WordPress.org usernames when attendees purchase a ticket.

Sure we could add a field and ask that, but then comes the question when badge should be added to profile. When a ticket is purchased? Then what happens if that ticket changes owner, is refunded or attendee doesn’t show up. If we add the badge after attendee has marked as attended in Camptix, not all would get a badge because not all WordCamps do use the functionality to mark attendance.

It’s also arguable whether attending to WordCamp is actually contributing to the project and something from which they should get a badge.

In the Trac ticket @andreamiddleton pointed out that in 2014 WordCamp San Francisco worked out a way display event registration and attendance on the activity log. She suggested that we recognise attendees in that way instead of giving badges.

Meetup attendees

Technically this is the hardest thing to achieve, because Meetups live totally their own lives in Meetup.com and don’t have strong connection to WordCamp.org or WordPress.org systems. We don’t have a way to link Meetup.com profile to WordPress.org username for giving them a badge. Surely it can probably be done if team invests a lot of time on developing this feature.

The same discussion as with WordCamp attendees on their level of contribution to the project also applies to Meetup attendees.

The proposal

I’m proposing:

Badge for WordCamp volunteers

We should create a new badge for WordCamp volunteers and recognise them the same way as we do for organisers and speakers. Technical aspects need to be decided with WordCamp Meta team, but I’d create a new post type and re-use same functionalities that are used for organisers and speakers.

Log note for WordCamp attendees

We should start asking WordPress.org username during ticket purchase with an optional field in preparations to recognising WordCamp attendees.

I’m in favour of Andrea’s suggestion on showing the attendance on profile log instead of giving them a badge. Log note could be added after the WordCamp, in case the ticket changes owner on the first event day. Logic could be that everyone with a ticket does get the note unless there are at least a certain amount of attendees marked as attended when log note would be added only to those attendees.

What about Meetups and other event formats?

For Meetup and our other event format attendees, I would say it’s a too low-level contribution towards the WordPress project and technically too complicated to implement. Hopefully we can start recognising them at some point, but not for now.

Feedback

Read the original proposal and discussion on Meta Track ticket, there are good arguments and points. Note: please don’t continue in that ticket, this P2 is the more correct place for it.

Please share your feedback on the topic and especially on:

  • Should WordCamp volunteers get a badge?
  • Should WordCamp attendees get a badge or a note in their log?
  • What things do we need to take into consideration in these cases?

Share your thoughts before 2020-08-13.

#attendees, #meetups-2, #recognition, #volunteers, #wordcamps #meetups

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: October 2019

Hello WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers!

Welcome to another meetup organizer newsletter full of news, information, and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US – Community Track
  • Watch the WordCamp US Live Stream with your Local Community
  • Meetup Kit released by WordCamp Asia
  • Tips on getting more speakers to your meetup
  • Reminders

WordCamp US – Community Track

This year WordCamp US is holding its first ever community track. This track will feature workshops and interactive presentations designed to include the audience.

Here is what is being covered on the community track:

Creating A Welcoming And Diverse Space
A workshop to create WordPress events in person or online; on how to create a welcoming and diverse space.

Grow Your Meetup
This workshop will cover some popular ideas around marketing tactics, meetup formats and ideas along with WordCamps to grow your meetup. Check out their Grow your meetup Survey!

Running A Successful Contributor Day
This workshop will cover how to go about running a contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. for WordCamp that has never done it before. It might also be useful for Contributor meetups.

Organizing A WordCamp While Staying Sane
This workshop will explore tools, software and techniques to remove barriers and make running a WordPress meetup easier.

Watch the WordCamp US Live Stream with your Local Community

WordCamp US 2019 is happening on Nov 1-3 and, to allow people all over the world to enjoy the great content, the organising team is opening up a live stream of the event.

This live stream will available for free all over the world, making it a great opportunity to get your local community together to watch it. It is also a great way to watch “State of the WordState of the Word This is the annual report given by Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress at WordCamp US. It looks at what we’ve done, what we’re doing, and the future of WordPress. https://wordpress.tv/tag/state-of-the-word/.” by Matt Mullenweg the founder of WordPress.

You can organize a “WordCamp US Live Stream Party” or a “State of the Word Live Stream Party” with your local meetup.

You can view the live stream by visiting the WCUS homepage.

WordCamp Asia 2020 Meetup Kit

The WordCamp Asia team in an effort to reach out to more meetups to learn about their first flagship WordCamp – have put together some useful resources as part of a meetup kit for organizers.

You can view the WordCamp Asia 2020 meetup kit here

Tips on getting more speakers to your meetup

Topher wrote a post on the community blog sharing a couple of tricks to get more speakers to your meetups.

One would be to encourage live remote speakers using video conference to talk about a topic that your meetup group wants to know more about but do not have a local speaker.

The other tip, suggests watching a session from WordPress.TV and then to have a round-table discussion around content at the meetup. Maybe have the speaker from the video available to take questions via chat.
You can read more about it here.

Reminders

That’s it for now — chat with you next time!

Your friends on the Community Team

make.wordpress.org/community

#newsletter #meetups

#meetup-organizer-newsletter

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: July 2019

Hello WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers!

Welcome to another meetup organizer newsletter full of news, information, and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • Diverse Speaker Training Workshops
  • Call for volunteers: Handbook Working Group
  • WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. for Publishers: Viewing Party
  • Reminders

Diverse Speaker Training Workshops

“I found the workshop incredibly helpful. I was feeling quite unsure about my upcoming WordPress meetup talk. I have honed in the topic and brainstormed a dozen other topics for the future!”

 – Vancouver workshop participant

As organizers, have you ever had challenges getting women and people from other underrepresented groups in tech to speak at your meetups and WordCamps? Check out the Diversity Outreach Speaker Training workshop (#wpdiversity): https://make.wordpress.org/training/speaker-training

Sign up to run the workshop here: http://tiny.cc/wpdiversity

Upcoming training timings:

– Wednesday, July 24 at 9pm-11pm UTC
– Thursday, Aug 8 at 9am-11am UTC
– Wednesday, Aug 21 at 9pm-11pm UTC

Diverse Speaker Training Workshops

“I found the workshop incredibly helpful. I was feeling quite unsure about my upcoming WordPress meetup talk. I have honed in the topic and brainstormed a dozen other topics for the future!”

 – Vancouver workshop participant

As organizers, have you ever had challenges getting women and people from other underrepresented groups in tech to speak at your meetups and WordCamps? Check out the Diversity Outreach Speaker Training workshop (#wpdiversity): https://make.wordpress.org/training/speaker-training

Sign up to run the workshop here: http://tiny.cc/wpdiversity

Upcoming training timings:

 – Wednesday, July 24 at 9pm-11pm UTC

 – Thursday, Aug 8 at 9am-11am UTC

 – Wednesday, Aug 21 at 9pm-11pm UTC

Call for volunteers: Handbook Working Group

As a meetup organizer, you might be aware of our helpful handbooks which provide a lot of information about the meetup program. There is currently a call for volunteers for the handbook working group

The goal of the group is to facilitate an audit and rework part of the content/information architecture to make them more useful than ever, and plan for future growth.

As meetup organizers if you are interested in volunteering for this project, go ahead and read up more info at this link.

WordCamp for Publishers: Viewing Party

Many WordCamps stream their content live all over the world, making it a great opportunity to get your local community together to watch it.

If you can’t travel to a WordCamp, then the live stream is a great way to share in the content of the event along with other local WordPress enthusiasts.

WordCamp for Publishers: Columbus is a community-organized event bringing together folks who use WordPress to manage publications, big or small. 

This event will empower participants by coaching them on best practices, and encourage collaboration in building open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. tools for publishers.

WordCamp for Publishers is working on a live stream for the day which will be available at https://2019-columbus.publishers.wordcamp.org/livestream/

Reminders

That’s it for now — chat with you next time!

Your friends on the Community Team
make.wordpress.org/community

#newsletter #meetups

#meetup-organizer-newsletter

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: June 2019

Hello WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers!

Welcome to another meetup organizer newsletter full of news, information, and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • Organizer Best Practices: Photographing your events!
  • The 4 Gets in WordPress Community Organizing
  • WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. US: Call for WordCamp Communities
  • Diverse Speaker Training Workshops
  • Reminders

Organizer best practices: Photographing your events

As community organizers and leaders, one of the few things we tend to overlook is using photography to promote our meetup groups.

For example, a group photo of the meetup is often one of the best ways to personalize your WordPress meetup.com group page. It is also a great way to drive interaction on social media channels towards making  more people aware of your meetup group.

This post on the community team blog, discusses a list of good practices around photographing an event.

This is part of the on-going Organizer Best Practices series of discussions on the WordPress Community team blog.

The 4 Gets in WordPress Community Organizing

The community organizer handbooks have lots of public information about how to organize events, but they do not outline very clearly what volunteers like you can reasonably expect in return for your work.

In this post about the 4 Gets in WordPress Community Organizing, on the community blog, read about what volunteers can expect to get from their work like impact, growth, protection, and training/support.

Also listed are some of the things that community organizers do not get right away.

WordCamp US: Call for WordCamp Communities

What once was called the Community Bazaar is now Community Spotlight! WordCamp US will post highlights of your WordPress communities in a blog post, and on Twitter, Facebook, & Instagram. Community Spotlight is an online showcase of local WordPress communities in order to inspire other communities. Big or small, near or far, WordPress communities are stronger than ever!

For more information and to sign up, please apply here: https://2019.us.wordcamp.org/community-spotlight/

Diverse Speaker Training Workshops

Have you ever had challenges getting women and people from other groups underrepresented in tech to speak at your meetups and WordCamps? Check out the Diversity Outreach Speaker Training workshop: https://make.wordpress.org/training/speaker-training

Write to us to sign up for this or find out about future training sessions here: http://tiny.cc/wpdiversity

To sign up and get more details, either fill out our form and let us know which date you’d would like to attend a training or email the working group at speaker-training@wordcamp.org

Reminders

That’s it for now — chat with you next time!

Your friends on the Community Team

make.wordpress.org/community

#meetups #newsletter

#meetup-organizer-newsletter

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: May 2019

Hello WordPress MeetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers!

Welcome to another meetup organizer newsletter full of news, information, and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • Organizer Best Practices: Make the most of your feedback!
  • Call for Organizers: Introduction to Open SourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. Workshops for 2019
  • Diversity Outreach Speaker Training Workshops
  • Reminders

Organizer best practices: Make the most of your feedback

On the Make Community blog, there is a discussion that has been kickstarted about some best practices as organizers, around collecting and acting on feedback that we receive.

The discussion includes answering the following questions

  • Where does feedback come from?
  • How to get better feedback?
  • What to do with feedback once you have it?

You can read the entire blog post here.

This is part of the on-going Organizer Best Practices series of discussions on the WordPress Community team blog.

Call for Organizers: Introduction to Open Source Workshops for 2019

Last year, in an effort to educate the public about WordPress and related open source software (OSS), the WordPress Foundation helped fund four “Introduction to Open Source” workshops in Ghana, India, Colombia and St. Lucia.

The goal of this workshop series is to highlight the potential of open source software in regions where there is less participation in OSS projects.

Last year’s workshops were quite successful, so in 2019 we’re expanding this program to support up to ten separate events.

If you want to organize the “Introduction to Open Source” workshop at your meetup, please read this announcement and fill in the form.

We’ll select and notify our first round of shortlisted groups by the 31st May 2019 and the second round of shortlisted groups by 31st August 2019.

The application form will be closed on 15th July 2019.

Diversity Outreach Speaker Training Workshops

Have you ever had trouble getting women and people from other groups underrepresented in tech to speak at your meetups and WordCamps?

Check out the Diversity Outreach Speaker Training workshop: https://make.wordpress.org/training/speaker-training

Write to us to sign up for this or find out about future training sessions here: http://tiny.cc/wpwomenspeak

To sign up and get more details, either fill out our form and comment with which date you’d would like to attend a training email the working group at speaker-training@wordcamp.org

Reminders

That’s it for now — chat to you next time!

Your friends on the Community Team

make.wordpress.org/community

#newsletter #meetup

#meetups, #meetup-organizer-newsletter

Organizer best practices: paths to leadership, or 11 ways to help your local meetup

As you all probably know, the global community team recommends a flat organizational structure for local WordPress community groups. Because open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. projects depend on a large, diverse group of contributors to collaborate and iterate quickly, we encourage that community organizers “always be recruiting” (and welcoming, and training) new leaders.

When there are lots of people with leadership experience in a community, local organizers can take more breaks and avoid burnout. As new leaders join the community, they bring new ideas, perspectives, and methods. Because organizers tend to organize for people like themselves, recruiting a diverse group of leaders is especially important — so that the community can take into account a broader spectrum of backgrounds, needs, interests, and lived experience.

OK sure but how?

Most people are on board with the *idea* of a large, diverse leadership team but struggle with recruiting. And that’s not really a surprise! Not all organizations are as open to new leaders as ours, so even constant repetition that “we’re always looking for more organizers” at every meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. event might not result in people stepping forward.

One way to make the recruitment process more gentle and perhaps less intimidating is to offer a gradual path to leadership. Many groups have found success with inviting people to help out with smaller, accessible tasks at first. Small contributions can lead to more complex jobs as the volunteer’s confidence and understanding of the group continues to grow.

Here are 11 ways to contribute to your local WordPress meetup, which can also serve as a graceful path to community leadership:

  1. spread the word about the meetup (sharing photos on social media, word of mouth, flyers, blog posts, etc)
  2. greet & welcome new attendees
  3. take attendance (if your group keeps a record of who actually attended the event)
  4. deliver opening or closing remarks (easier if the points to cover are written down)
  5. facilitate a round-table discussion
  6. give a presentation
  7. help find a free venue
  8. record & post a presentation to WordPress.tv
  9. organize refreshments
  10. suggest or recruit speakers
  11. organize an event series

Add to the list

Community organizers, speak out! What can meetup members do to help your group thrive, which aren’t listed above? What does the path to leadership look like in your home community?

Once we collect as many examples as possible, we can create a new Meetup Organizer Handbook page to share these suggestions with current and new Meetup organizers. Please share your ideas and experiences in a comment on this post!

#leadership, #meetups-2, #organizer-best-practices

#meetups