Proposal: QR code for WordCamp badges

Bigger WordCamps spend a lot of time in registration of the attendees upon arrival or for workshops and handing out swag like T-shirts based on lists that exist (mainly on paper). A QR code on e.g. a cellphone or tablet could speed up things.I saw somebody already opened a tracTrac Trac is the place where contributors create issues for bugs or feature requests much like GitHub.https://core.trac.wordpress.org/. ticket (https://meta.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/4162), but there was nor further follow up, so please find below my proposal after having led registration and swag at WCEU 2019:

Phase1: Add the QR code in the email when buying a ticket and on the WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. site when attendee logs in with the personal credentials.

Phase2: Attach as pkpass (or other) to the email and allow downloading that file from the site.

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#badges

Recent profile badge changes

If you are a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizer, Community Deputy or a WordCamp Mentor, then you would have noticed a recent change to the badges that you see on your WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profile. To clear up any confusion, this post provides an explanation about what has happened here. This ticket outlines the decisions made, but here’s a breakdown of it all in an easily digestible format.

Up until now, the Community Team had two badges related to it: The Community Team badge and the WordCamp Speaker badges. The Team badge used the standard Community icon with a plain white background, and the Speaker badge used the standard Speaker icon. The Team badge was automatically assigned to all WordCamp organizers and then could also be assigned manually to anyone involved in the team.

Going forward we have made a few changes to this system for two main reasons:

  1. We want to bring the Community badges in line with the structure of the other teams.
  2. We want the badges to correctly reflect people’s involvement in the Community Team.

With that in mind, here are the Community badges that you will see on your profiles:

Community Team

The Community Team badge will be manually assigned to all active Community Deputies – i.e those who are listed as “Active” on this page. You can find out more about the Deputy program (and how to get involved) here.

Community Contributor

The Community Contributor badge will be manually assigned to all WordCamp Mentors, as well as those who provide valuable contributions to the Community Team. Mentors are all listed as “Active (mentor only)” on this page. In the future, mentors will be auto-assigned this badge when they begin mentoring their first WordCamp (removing the manual administration side of things). You can find out more about the WordCamp Mentorship program here. In the future, we will also assign this badge to meetup group organizers once have established an automated way of doing it.

WordCamp Organizer

The WordCamp Organizer badge is now distinct from the Community Contributor badge so that you can more immediately see what an individual’s contribution to the team is. The chosen icon represents WordCamps directly and gives us a way to recognize all of the amazing WordCamp organizers around the world more effectively. This badge is auto-assigned to all members of WordCamp organizing teams.

WordCamp Speaker

The WordCamp Speaker badge remains exactly the same as before – it is auto-assigned to all WordCamp speakers to recognize their valuable contribution to the community.


We hope that with these changes, we will be able to more correctly recognize all of the work that so many people do to grow the WordPress community all around the world.

#badges #profiles

Contributor Badges as stickers for all

In preparation for WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Bern, Switzerland in September I was did a bit of research regarding contribution badges as stickers. For our Contributor DayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/. we need only around 50 stickers of each badge.

Our problem is that StickerGiant has a minimum of 250 stickers per badge and the price of per sticker drops a huge amount when the numbers increase. For example

  • 250 0.48 / Sticker
  • 500 0.26 / Sticker
  • 1’000 0.15 / Sticker
  • 2’000 0.10 / Sticker

My initial idea was that just to get a few interested WordCamp together and do a combine order but then Andrea Middleton suggested that the Contributor Badges sticker could be included in with the WordPress swag.

The questions that we need to discuss are:

  • Do we want to do a trial with 10 WordCamps where 1’000 stickers are ordered of the badges and cost distributed across the 10 WordCamps? Each WordCamp would get around 100 stickers of each badge.
  • Do we order 2000 and distribute them to the future WordCamps and review it once the stocks have deplenished?
  • Would the cost of these contributor badge stickers be covered by the foundation like with the WordPress swag or should a small fee like 100$ be deducted from the budget?
  • How much additional work would this create for the Community Team managing the swag?

Also Courtney previously started a discussion on how we should manage the WordPress Swag as they make an order every 18 months.

Swag for Meetup Groups

#community-badges

#badges

Community Team badges for user profiles

There has been a bit of discussion about this in the past and recently, but now that we have a really solid idea of how the deputy programme works and a mostly clear view of who is and isn’t a deputy, it would be valuable to look at creating a ‘proper’ Community Team badge for WordPress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ profiles. How most contributor teams work is that they have one badge for general contributors to the team and a second badge (that looks like the first, but has a shaded background) that is for the ‘coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress.’ group of that contribution team (see my profile and read the badge tooltips if you’re unfamiliar with the differences).

The full list of badges is here – we currently have only one for ‘Community Team’ that is a standard badge with no background. That badge is assigned to anyone on the team (which need to be added manually) as well as automatically for anyone who is added as a WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organiser. I would propose the following changes:

  1. We change the existing badge to a ‘Community Contributor’ badge and it remains as being auto-assigned for WordCamp organisers and we could maybe also manually assign it for meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organisers if that makes sense for the programme.
  2. We then add a new ‘Community Team’ badge (which has the shaded background), which would be manually assigned to the community team, super deputies and deputies.

This would bring the Community badges more in line with the other contribution teams (consistency FTW) and it would also indicate who is involved in things centrally and who is a local organiser. Badges like this are a nice way to acknowledge people’s contributions to WordPress, so it’s more than just a thing to show off – I think it actually encourages increased involvement.

The issue, of course, is how we would decide the criteria for who would receive the Team badge. I would suggest that people who meet the following criteria would receive the badge:

  1. Anyone who works full time for the Community Team.
  2. The Super Deputies.
  3. Deputies who have answered at least 30 tickets on Help Scout in the last 3 months (in reality, these numbers would probably be somewhat flexible as some tickets take a lot more time than others).
  4. WordCamp Mentors who have mentored at least 2 (or 3?) WordCamps in the last 12 months.

This would mean that new deputies would not immediately receive the badge just for completing the deputy training and, as a result, badges would only be given for active work in the community (as is the intention behind the profile badges).

In the name of not erasing the efforts/contributions of formerly active contributors, I don’t think we need to keep track of ongoing activity. We can use the 30 tickets in 3 months metric as an initial milestone, but we don’t want to retroactively undermine someone’s past work if they fall below that milestone later on.

Probably the best way to manage this (as manually assigning badges does create extra work of course) is to check in on our active deputies every quarter and manually assign badges as required. It would be great if we could automate this quarterly check, but not the end of the world if we cannot do so.

If everyone is happy with this, the first step would be to design the new badge (which consists solely of adding a shaded background to the existing one) and then submitting a MetaMeta Meta is a term that refers to the inside workings of a group. For us, this is the team that works on internal WordPress sites like WordCamp Central and Make WordPress. request to have it added along with the initial list of to whom it will be assigned.

If you have any major concerns about this or any votes of confidence then please comment here and we can get this done.

#feedback, #badges

New Tool for Creating Personalized WordCamp Badges

Creating personalized badges for attendees to wear has always been a difficult and time-consuming process. In the past we’ve had some tools to make it easier, but they still required a lot of expertise and manual work.

@georgestephanis recently came up with a great idea to change all that, though, by creating the badges with HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. and CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site.. He then went even further, building a proof-of-concept, and a prototype. After a few enhancements to the prototype, the new tool is now available on your site!

Here’s an example of what the badge preview looks like with the default design. The first area that you see is the back of the badge (which is why it’s upside-down), and the area below that is the front of the badge. Both sides are identical, and the front has a marker to punch holes for lanyards.

create-badges-with-html-css

 

You can find the tool under Tickets > Tools > Generate Badges, or by opening the CustomizerCustomizer Tool built into WordPress core that hooks into most modern themes. You can use it to preview and modify many of your site’s appearance settings. and looking for CampTix HTML Badges.

When you get there, you’ll find personalized badges for all of your attendees, including their names and Gravatars. You can then edit the CSS to customize the badges, so that they fit your camp’s design. As you edit your CSS in the Customizer, you’ll get a live preview of the how the badges will look.

The underlying markup has plenty of CSS classes to help with customization. For example, you could make volunteer badges have a different background color (so that volunteers are easier to find), or make attendee’s last name appear in a smaller font than their first. There are also plenty of empty <div> elements that you can re-purpose for arbitrary design features.

Once you’re ready, just print them to a PDF and take that file to a local print shop for printing and cutting. You can check out a sample PDF to get a better idea of what it will look like.

Full documentation is available in the Organizer Handbook.

This is just a v1, so there’s lots of room for improvement. If you have any feedback, please leave a comment! If you’d like to contribute a patch, the source code is available in the Meta repository or through the Meta Environment.

If you’d like to have some more advanced design options, we also have a tool for creating personalized badges with InDesign, but at the moment it requires a lot more work than this new tool. If you’d like to help improve that process, you can contribute to Meta ticket #262.

 

#badges, #official-websites

Name Badges are hard to make, and confusing for organizers.

Especially if they want pretty GravatarGravatar Is an acronym for Globally Recognized Avatar. It is the avatar system managed by WordPress.com, and used within the WordPress software. https://gravatar.com/. badges.

I’ve always had some problems with InDesign — some technical (my only experience in InDesign is making badges the past two years, and it always feels confusing) and others philosophical (should we really be this all-in on a proprietary, commercial piece of software?)

To that end, I knocked together a rough proof of concept this morning — took about an hour and change — that generates name badges purely in HTMLHTML HTML is an acronym for Hyper Text Markup Language. It is a markup language that is used in the development of web pages and websites. and CSSCSS CSS is an acronym for cascading style sheets. This is what controls the design or look and feel of a site. — languages that nearly every organizing team will have someone familiar with.

You can see the code here: https://gist.github.com/georgestephanis/1057841cff4ebdc0eba5

And the generated markup — once printed (in this case, to a PDF) looks like this:

Click to access Z0n7Tg0LET.pdf

I’m planning on expanding on this to either a standalone, or internal tool for organizers to customize and generate badges. (standalone for the short term, internal if y’all like the idea and want to move forward with it).

As WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. sites know the WordCamp name, and the WordCamp Logo, they can generate these badges with very little necessary user input or customization — although users can always further customize them before printing, if desired.

Related: https://meta.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/262

#badges, #wordcamps