Discussion: Revisiting In-person Regional WordCamps

The Community Team is seeing a renewed interest in in-person regional WordCamps in the light of a slow but steady return of in-person WordCamps. This post aims to take another look at our existing guidelines for regional WordCamps and to explore whether the process for organizing an in-person WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. could be improved or simplified. 

Context

Traditionally, WordCamps have been local, city-based events that had active local meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. groups, with the exception of flagship camps such as WordCamp US and WordCamp Europe. In pre-pandemic times, several local communities expressed interest in organizing regional events, which helped our team prepare guidelines for regional WordCamps. Established communities with experienced organizers could organize a regional camp by submitting a formal proposal, which would be reviewed by deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. before proceeding further. WordCamp Nordic (which was held successfully in 2019) and WordCamp Asia are two camps that were born out of these guidelines. Our team also discussed the possibility of organizing micro-regional WordCamps where multiple cities could come together to organize a single camp. As a result of these conversations, our enthusiastic Dutch community organizers paved way for the return of WordCamp Netherlands in 2020, which was later canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Online Regional In-Person Events

In 2020, the Community team relaxed the pathway to regional online WordCamps, allowing communities to organize regional events without a lot of hassle. This resulted in a bunch of online regional WordCamps in Centroamerica, Greece, Finland, India, Italy, Japan, Spain, and Taiwan, among others. These events were quite successful in bringing together local communities even despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Approaching In-Person Regional Events in 2022

WordCamp Netherlands (which was originally approved in 2019) is back on the schedule for 2022 as an in-person event. Some local communities have also approached WordCamp CentralWordCamp Central Website for all WordCamp activities globally. https://central.wordcamp.org includes a list of upcoming and past camp with links to each., expressing their interest in organizing regional events. At this time, our organizers are still encouraged to plan smaller city-based WordCamps over larger regional events (especially in the light of COVID restrictions that are still in place in many regions). However, I strongly feel that the Community Team should revisit the existing guidelines for regional events due to a renewed interest in the same. I would like to listen to your feedback on how, as a community, we can proceed with in-person regional events, going forward. 

  1. What guidelines should a community meet to organize a regional event?
  2. How can the team better define micro-regional WordCamps, and can we do anything to simplify their process? For example, would a relatively smaller region – such as a state or a group of cities in countries like the USA or Canada, OR a country in Europe such as the Netherlands or Italy – qualify as a micro-regional WordCamp? Additionally, should we even have micro-regional WordCamps – can we just define regional camps using a uniform language and uniform guidelines?
  3. Is there anything that should be changed or simplified about the application process for regional WordCamps? (For example, are proposals still required for a regional guidelines, or can these guidelines still be enforced in orientations?)
  4. Are there any learnings from online regional events in 2020 and 2021 that can be applied to in-person regional events going forward? 

Please share your thoughts in the comments by April 4, 2022 (Monday). Based on your feedback, our team will explore the possibility of revamping guidelines for regional WordCamps and will share the next steps shortly. 

The following folks contributed to this post: @angelasjin @devinmaeztri @peiraisotta @juliarosia and @nao

#regional-wordcamps #discussion

Announcement: Incident Response Training

One of the Community Team’s goals for 2021 included creation of an incident response training course. I am pleased to share that this training now has a first draft, which has been reviewed by @andreamiddleton, @hlashbrooke, @kcristiano, @sippis, @bph, @nao, and @adityakane, all deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. with experience taking reports and responding to incidents. Course assessments and exercises received an extra review from @arasae. Thank you all very much for getting this course to where it is today!

I’m personally very excited about this training. Historically, WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. organizers and deputies are asked to take incident reports if something happens at their events, and a handful of community deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. have actively worked on responding to incident reports in the past. Because of the confidentiality and nature of this work, it is often difficult and invisible. It hasn’t always been clear what to do when something happens, although a recent Tuesday Training on Codes of Conduct and Reporting does an excellent job of summarizing the work.  

With this training, the Community Team makes the complex process of taking and responding to incident reports more transparent in the WordPress space, and will be able to effectively train contributors in responding to reports. This training will eventually be available to everyone, and will be of particular interest to event organizers, team representatives, and anyone interested in making WordPress a safer community. At the moment, the course covers the following four modules: 

  1. Introduction to the Incident Response Team
  2. Overview of Process and Expectations of the Incident Response Team
  3. Taking Incident Reports
  4. Responding to Incident Reports

Call for Volunteers

The training is not yet ready for public release, but feedback is needed! At this time, I would like to invite volunteers to participate in a pre-release version of incident response training, to both learn the content and offer feedback and suggestions for improvement. 

If you are interested in participating, helpful background experience includes participation as a community team deputyDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. or mentorMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues., or as a WordCamp organizer. I welcome other Making WordPress team reps to participate, if this is of interest. 

Volunteers for this alpha release of the training will be asked to do the following:

  • Complete two surveys to assess before and after levels of knowledge/familiarity with incident response processes
  • Complete an estimated 6 hours of reading material and quizzes
  • Offer feedback to improve or clarify course content 

At the moment, the training is in Learn WordPress as a text only course, but the final version will include recorded content. In total, I am estimating that volunteers for this round will be asked for no more than 12 hours over the next month. 

To keep this round of feedback manageable, it may be necessary to cap how many volunteers participate, prioritizing those with relevant experience and availability. However, the final course will be made publicly available, and edits can always be made in the future. If you are interested in participating, or have any questions, please comment below by Monday, July 26, 2021. You can also reach out to me in the Making WordPress Slack (@angelasjin), or email at support@wordcamp.org.

Proposal: Steps to Integrate #WPDiversity into WordPress Event Organizing

Context

To fulfill WordPress’s mission to democratize publishing, the Community team seeks to actively reduce barriers to current and future participation, engagement, and sense of belonging in WordPress events.

People who experience marginalization in broader society are more likely to experience barriers to full participation in their WordPress community. As community contributors, we have the ability and responsibility to actively counteract these forces to build a thriving, inclusive community.

The WordPress community is diverse and global. The power of open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. is that anyone can contribute from anywhere at any time, regardless of their background.

The more diverse our community is, the stronger it becomes. With different perspectives come new innovations, ideas, and solutions. This results in better user experiences for all, from bloggers setting up sites to organizers and attendees of our in-person community events.

Inclusive environments don’t happen overnight – or without effort. As our community grows, so have ideas and efforts to help welcome more diverse voices into the fold.

WPDiversity Programs

#WPDiversity programs are designed to empower WordPress community members with skills and resources to organize and contribute to diverse and inclusive WordPress events. This proposal offers a pathway to introduce all WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. and meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. organizers to #WPDiversity programs, with the aim of helping to strengthen their events from inception.

By proactively sharing information about these programs and an invitation to participate with new and existing event organizers, we can shape a culture in which awareness of and action toward diversity and inclusion are embedded in events from the planning outset.

Proposal

Existing WordCamp and Meetup Organizers

All WordCamp and meetup organizers would receive an email inviting and encouraging them to take the following actions in preparation for their upcoming or ongoing WordPress events:

  • Participate in the Allyship training (interactive video watch party or watch the prerecorded video on their own);
  • Organize an Allyship and/or Diverse Speaker training for their local community, or invite their community to join one of the regularly-scheduled global trainings.
  • Join the #DiverseSpeakerSupport SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/. channel, participate in the channel discussions, and share their event’s calls for organizers and speakers; and request that their Speaker WranglerWrangler Someone, usually a person part of event organizing team, who looks after certain things like budget or sponsors. do the same.

New WordCamp and Meetup Organizers

All new WordCamp and meetup organizers would automatically receive the invitation described above as they are onboarded.

All WordCamp and Meetup Organizers

Further, all event organizers would be required to:

  • Read handbook pages that cover key concepts and practices for creating a welcoming and inclusive event;
  • Demonstrate comprehension through the completion of a quiz.

An effective starting point would be to add new lessons to the Meetup Organizer Training and WordCamp Organizer Training. The required reading would include links to optional resources to go deeper.

Share Your Feedback!

Please share your thoughts on this proposal by Friday, April 8! I would be interested to know:

  • How might this approach impact your community?
  • What do you like about this approach?
  • What’s missing?
  • What other ideas do you have?

Kudos to @angelasjin, @mysweetcate, @alliennimmons, @wpfangirl, @devinmaeztri, @peiraisotta, @jillbinder, @nao, @tacoverdo and @planningwrite for contributing to this post.

#community-events, #community-team, #event-planning-training-materials, #events-2

Return to In-Person Events: Blue Sky Thinking

When we come together we step outside of our comfort zones and regular thinking and open ourselves to new, innovative ideas. When you’re gathered together, away from the distractions of regular life, your mind opens and creativity flows.

While there was lots of innovation around online events, COVID stopped in person events in its tracks, but that seems to be changing.

This post gives us a place to share ideas on how we can support organizers who are trying to restart in-person events in their communities.

What is Blue Sky Thinking?

Blue Sky Thinking is just another way to say “brainstorming”. The idea is simply that the sky is the limit to any ideas you might have to share. Even if it seems unachievable now, who knows when the right pieces might exist to make it possible.

So, for our purposes here, share your ideas below with kindness and compassion as your only limits.

The Goals of This Exercise

We have three goals to meet in this exercise:

  • support organizers as they navigate COVID concerns
  • help attendees feel safe and comfortable
  • offer resources and options that make being together at in person events exciting and interesting

If we don’t meet the first two, then the community is unlikely to use our ideas.

Why? The people we’re trying to bring with us have changed. This article from Andrea Middleton dives into that a little more.

The Organizers We’re Helping

As people, we’ve been through a lot. We’ve all made some painful choices and worked extra hard just to manage what used to be simple tasks. We’re tired and we’re more cautious than ever.

If we’re feeling that way in general, how much harder must it be for those organizing and attending events?

However, if our organizers feel supported and our attendees feel safe, they’ll more readily embrace ideas we’ve laid out for them to implement.

There’s a very good chance this could be achieved by continuing to clearly state our COVID guidelines and how we help organizers implement them, as well as easy to access channels for both organizers and attendees to ask questions.

It’s Time for Your Ideas to Reactivate In-Person Events

Once people are more comfortable being together, we can move one step further and help make organizing events a little easier.

Fortunately for us, WordPress has been far from idle in the pandemic. New programs like Learn and the Photo Directory have been launched, just to name a few. Along with what’s new, there are also some resources that are still relatively unknown to the community like the do_action events.

These new and existing resources could be used to help ease the weight of planning and streamline a return to events with less additional effort on our part.

But let’s not stop there!

Through brainstorming, we can look at the resources we have with new eyes, and possibly even use them as a prompt for more ideas. Who knows where your creativity and unique perspectives can take us!

This is Blue Sky Thinking after all. Don’t let what we have done or current resources limit your creativity. Any and all ideas are welcome here. How we do it or if we can do it are irrelevant. This is a purely open sandbox.

Before You Share

Remember:

  • this is asynchronous brainstorming
  • there are no wrong answers
  • be kind to fellow brainstormers
  • the discussion on implementation will come later

Guidelines:

  • Share your Concept
  • Answer what you can from this list (no pressure here)
    • Why do you think this is a good idea?
    • Who would benefit?
    • Does this meet Community team goals?
    • Does it use any existing resources?
  • Post your response by April 22, 2022

Let the brainstorming begin!

#discussion #wordcamps #meetups #brainstorming

Upcoming #WPDiversity Events: April 2022

Speaker Workshop

Does the thought of speaking at one of our WordPress MeetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. or WordCamps intrigue you? Do you think you don’t know or have anything worth speaking about?

Even though it will be lead by #WPDiversity, this workshop is open to all in WordPress thinking about speaking at a MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. in Nigeria.

Allyship Program

Cohorts 1 and 2 of the Allyship for WP Event Organizers, WCUSWCUS WordCamp US. The US flagship WordCamp event. organizers, and WCEUWCEU WordCamp Europe. The European flagship WordCamp event. organizers are officially invited. Other people are welcome to watch and even join in and are encouraged to join cohort 3 in May 2022 (date TBD).

Reminder: Proposal Feedback

A reminder that feedback is open for the Proposal: Steps to Integrate #WPDiversity into WordPress Event Organizing until end of day April 8, 2022. Thank you for your help!

#wpdiversityworkshops

WCSF Viewing Parties for WordPress Meetup Groups

Attention all WordPress meetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook.! WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. San Francisco, the annual conference of the WordPress project, is coming up at the end of this month. Wouldn’t it be fun for your meetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. group to get together and watch the livestream together? Kind of a WCSFx?

For meetups on the chapter program that wish to hold a viewing party, we will provide free livestream access and will pay for a venue if a donated one cannot be found. You’ll need two rooms so that both tracks can be streamed simultaneously, just like at WCSF. We will not cover refreshments or other incidental costs. You can either have people bring a lunch (recommended) or you can ask a local sponsor to pitch in and provide food.

If you want to organize a viewing party, let us know so we can set you up with an access code. If we will need to pay for a venue, it will need to be approved per https://make.wordpress.org/community/meetups/meetup-venue-approval-request/, so fill in that form as soon as possible.

It’s a good idea to have a few people organize the viewing party together, just so no one winds up with too much to do.

#meetups-2, #viewing-parties, #wcsf, #wcsf2014

Meetup Organizer Newsletter: March 2022

Hello everyone,

Welcome to the March 2022 edition of the MeetupMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. Organizer Newsletter. We sincerely hope all our community members in Ukraine are safe and sound. WordPress Co-Founder Matt Mullenweg shared his thoughts on Ukraine, community and WordPress in the 26th episode of WP Briefing.

To learn about the latest news and resources from the WordPress community, keep reading this month’s edition and don’t forget to share the updates with your local meetup groups! For more news from the WordPress community, check out the latest Month in WordPress.

Here’s what’s inside this issue:

  • WordPress 6.0
  • Contribute to WordPress
  • A blog for developers
  • WordPress events

🎷 WordPress 6.0 set to release on May 24, 2022

The release schedule for WordPress 6.0, the second major releaseMajor Release A set of releases or versions having the same major version number may be collectively referred to as “X.Y” -- for example version 5.2.x to refer to versions 5.2, 5.2.1, and all other versions in the 5.2. (five dot two dot) branch of that software. Major Releases often are the introduction of new major features and functionality. of 2022, has been published. As an iteration over the Go/No Go demos, WordPress leads will host a live-streamed walkthrough of features slated for the release on April 5, 2022. Follow the schedule to keep up with key dates in the next major WordPress release, and keep your local community in the loopLoop The Loop is PHP code used by WordPress to display posts. Using The Loop, WordPress processes each post to be displayed on the current page, and formats it according to how it matches specified criteria within The Loop tags. Any HTML or PHP code in the Loop will be processed on each post. https://codex.wordpress.org/The_Loop.!

While you’re waiting for WordPress 6.0, check out the WordPress 5.9.2 maintenance release which was released last week!

🤝 Contribute to WordPress

If you’re looking for new ways to get involved in the WordPress community, the following opportunities are a great way to get started. 

📷 WordPress Photo Directory gets a new Make team

The WordPress Photo Directory has a new Make team! There is currently a poll to vote for team reps and the collaboration is happening at the new #photos channel of the Make WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.. If you’re interested, join the conversation or contribute by submitting your photos.

🏳️‍🌈 Join the #WPDiversity working group

The #WPDiversity working group is looking for volunteers, and it’s not too late to sign up. Check out this recap of the latest volunteers meeting to see the available roles. Spread the word in your local community, and if you’re interested in joining the group yourself, go ahead and apply

Interested in widening your pool of Meetup and WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. speakers from underrepresented groups? Join the #diverse-speaker-support channel on the Make WordPress Slack.

 💻 Proposal for a new blog for developers

Birgit Pauli-Haack published a proposal to start a blog on developer.wordpress.orgWordPress.org The community site where WordPress code is created and shared by the users. This is where you can download the source code for WordPress core, plugins and themes as well as the central location for community conversations and organization. https://wordpress.org/ to share news and updates relevant to developers. Read the proposal and share your thoughts and ideas for improvements by March 18, 2022.

🌍 What’s happening with WordPress events?

We’d like to thank our global community sponsors for 2022 who make WordPress events possible! 2022 has many exciting WordPress events, both in person and online. As always, we strongly urge you to follow the mandatory safety guidelines and also learn about the legal protections available to you for in-person events. 

🎪 WordCamps on the horizon

We have plenty of WordCamps taking place this year. Below are some of the WordCamps coming up soon—feel free to attend or share them with your meetup groups!

💛 Upcoming WordPress meetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook.

Check out the WordPress meetups coming up in March:

📚 Support the Learn WordPress initiative

Help make Learn WordPress the official resource on WordPress! Share your knowledge with others by organizing a social learning space based on any of the Learn WordPress workshops. Alternately, use lesson plans on Learn WordPress to organize WordPress meetups in your community! See the Tuesday Training for Meetup Organizers for an overview on how to use lesson plans.

🤝 Sign-up for free to the upcoming WordPress Social Learning Spaces:

And that’s a wrap!


If you have any questions, Community Team deputiesDeputy Community Deputies are a team of people all over the world who review WordCamp and Meetup applications, interview lead organizers, and generally keep things moving at WordCamp Central. Find more about deputies in our Community Deputy Handbook. are here to help. Please email us at support@wordcamp.org or join the #community-events Slack channel. Thanks for everything you do to grow and support the WordPress community—let’s keep sharing knowledge and inspiring each other with our contributions!

See you online soon!

#meetup-organizer-newsletter #newsletter

The following people contributed to this edition of the Meetup newsletter: @rmartinezduque, @eidolonnight, @harishanker, @mysweetcate, @webcommsat, @lmurillom.

#community-team, #wordcamps

Recap of the Diverse Speaker Training group (#WPDiversity) on February 23, 2022

Attending: @jillbinder, @alliennimmons, @anjanavasan, @chrisford, @donreid, @eidolonnight, @firoz2456, @heyyearl, @jasonnickerson, @katiejrichards, @kcrockett, @kimberlylipari, @mmcwilliams, @mysweetcate, @nouman27, @onealtr, @peiraisotta, @planningwrite, @sc0ttkclark, @volkswagenchick, @webcommsat, @wpfangirl

Summary

This meeting was held over Zoom.

For the first half, @jillbinder presented these slides:

  • Our group’s birth and impact

  • Our current 3 programs

  • Roles available (interested? descriptions in slides above ^ )

    • Diverse Speaker Workshops:
      • Workshop volunteer — background support
      • Workshop volunteer — front-end
      • Workshop facilitator
      • Workshop coordinators team
      • Translator

    • Diverse Speaker Support program:
      • Speaker MentorMentor Someone who has already organised a WordCamp and has time to meet with their assigned mentee every 2 weeks, they talk over where they should be in their timeline, help them to identify their issues, and also identify solutions for their issues.
      • Speaker Mentor Coordinator

    • Allyship for WordPress Event Organizers program:
      • Workshop volunteer — background support
      • Workshop volunteer — front-end
      • Workshop facilitator

    • General:
      • WP Events Coordination Team
      • New volunteer greeter
      • Workshop facilitator
      • Document editor
      • Meeting Attendees

    • Specialty
      • APAC team
      • WordCampWordCamp WordCamps are casual, locally-organized conferences covering everything related to WordPress. They're one of the places where the WordPress community comes together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. Learn more. Europe reps

  • Interest form

In the second half, we had an open discussion where people expressed interest in roles and shared ideas:

  • An offer to start translating into Italian
  • An offer to be part of our WCEUWCEU WordCamp Europe. The European flagship WordCamp event. reps
  • An offer of project management, getting our team onto Asana
  • Interest in having workshops for a member’s local WP community in the US
  • Pointing out that the workshops are a way for people of underrepresented groups in local communities to network
  • Folks interested in being part of the group without a specific role (yes!)

#wpdiversity

Discussion: Diversity in WordPress Events

Edit on February 23, 2022 This post has been translated into the following languages:

Indonesian
Traditional Chinese (Taiwan)
Japanese
Portuguese (Brazil)
Nepali
Italian

Recently, there have been questions about diversity at WordPress events, especially WordCamps. The Community team values and prioritizes diversity, as the more diverse our community is, the stronger, more innovative, and more resilient it becomes. 

Increasing diversity in WordPress events is not the responsibility of just one continent, community, event, or team. Everyone can make a difference. Talking about diversity is not new for the WordPress community, but I am particularly glad that to have this conversation at this time. 

For one, because of the pandemic, there are new barriers to participation that may not have been considered. Second, organizers are cautiously restarting in-person events. This is a potentially impactful time to gain a better understanding of what barriers underrepresented community members face, what empowers individuals to participate at WordPress events, and how to support organizers in creating more inclusive spaces.

On top of that, a unique opportunity and simultaneous challenge for global communities like WordPress is how to honor diversity in local areas and cultures AND celebrate the diversity of our global community as a whole. 

To that end, I only have my perspective and experience, and I’m missing information in my current understanding of diversity across our big, global community. So, I’d like to hear from you. 

Open discussion

Over the years, I’ve heard many solutions and suggestions on how to address challenges around diversity, which is awesome! But because the global situation has shifted so much, I would like to hear about your experience with diversity at WordPress WordCamps and MeetupsMeetup Meetup groups are locally-organized groups that get together for face-to-face events on a regular basis (commonly once a month). Learn more about Meetups in our Meetup Organizer Handbook. first, so that the Community Team has a deeper understanding of where experiences match and where they differ. 

Talking about diversity can be deeply personal, so please do not feel you need to participate if you don’t feel comfortable. You can comment on this post, or if you prefer, I welcome chatting with you directly, and you can DM me in the Making WordPress SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/.

To the extent you feel comfortable, I’d love to hear:

  • What country are you based in?
  • Do you participate in WordCamps or Meetups, and if so, how? (participation can include attending, speaking, sponsoring, or organizing)
  • What prevents you from participating in WordCamps or Meetups?
  • What challenges are you seeing in diversity today?
  • How does your community define diversity?
  • What have you seen or experienced that increased diversity in your community?
  • What have you seen or experienced that decreased diversity in your community?

In sharing our stories, I hope to learn more about you, and that everyone who reads this discussion might learn about someone else’s experience!

Please share your story in the comments below by Monday, February 28, 2022, after which I will close this post for comments with a summary of key takeaways and learnings. Because the goal of this discussion is to learn more about individual experiences with diversity around the world, it is difficult to say what next steps or outcomes of this discussion will be! However, this is an important and helpful step in identifying where the Community team could strengthen the WordPress events program, and will certainly result in future proposals for discussion. 

A note for this post in particular

Please focus comments on sharing your experiences only – I know WordPressers all have excellent and different ideas towards diversity, but that is not what this post is about! That will come later 🙂