More Local Events (and better tools for supporting local events)

We want to help user/meetup groups to do more events (socials, trainings, hackathons, contributor days) by making it easier to provide financial support to event organizers. We also want to track the events that are held and measure whether they’re a good use of the funds that go out.

The Challenge(s):

  1. We don’t have a program that tells local WordPress user groups what kind of events we’re willing to support or how we’ll measure the success of those events.
  2. We don’t have an easy way to collect info from event organizers about the events they want to organize, including budget/location/date.
  3. We don’t have an easy way to collect vendor payment requests associated with these events.

Let’s use existing tools for new programs

Here’s the thing: we already have an application that creates an auto-filled post type on central.wordcamp.org, right? That’s what we use for the WordCamp application! So, what if we:

  1. create another application just for local groups that want to organize a local-event-that-is-not-a-WordCamp (or heck, we use the same form, add an Event Type field, and just make it branch off into a WordCamp application if they choose WordCamp)…
  2. This form creates an auto-filled post type called Event (or if we want to, we can make lots of different post types: Hackathon, Training, Contributor Day, Viewing Party, Meetup, Social) that we vet/approve just like WordCamp or Meetup applications.
  3. In this form, we collect the following info:
    • Who: wporg username and meetup URL
    • What: event type
    • When: proposed date
    • Where: address of proposed event
    • How (much): projected budget
    • Why: metrics projections/quantifiable goals of the event
  4. When the form is submitted, it populates a public-facing dashboard of local events that are applying for financial support, including data on proposed cost and goals.
  5. When the grant is approved, that info is added to the public page.
  6. Upon grant approval, the organizer becomes a contributor on Central and gets an automated email with:
    • a link to a page where they can submit a vendor payment/reimbursement request and
    • where they should fill out their event report when the event is complete.
  7. We create a public-facing vendor payment/reimbursement request form that someone can only fill out if they’re logged in, which will include a field for the local event/grant that the expense is linked to, and then process the vendor payments in our normal payments workflow.
  8. If the event goes over-budget, that will be publicly reported; if the event does not meet its goals, that will be publicly reported; if the event report is not filled out, that organizer will not be able to receive funding again until it is completed.

Let’s talk about metrics for a second.

Currently, the only success metrics for an event in our program are:

  • number of people who attended
  • attendee survey
  • length of event
  • budget surplus/deficit
  • number of CoC violations = (0, we hope)
I think we can do better than that. In fact, I think we can do WAY better than that.

What if we identify some ways to measure the success of an official event, set some goals that correlate with budget size, and then ask organizing teams to tell us what kind of numbers they’re going for when they’re proposing an event? Then after the event is over, organizer(s) can fill out a little debrief form that will auto-populate a post on make/cmty or Central.

Transparency! Accountability! Measurable goals!

(insert swoon here)

Sounds good, but what will we measure?

The Wikimedia Foundation’s metrics are a pretty good start, but here’s my first stab at metrics for OUR different event types. These are all TOTALLY just guesses (well, except for the WordCamp one), but I think they would go a long way toward creating a comparable set of goals that we could use to take a critical look at where money is going, whether events are meeting their own goals, and then why/why not. Contributor Day/Event goals will definitely need an assist from the relevant contributor teams. 🙂

Event Type Metrics Financial support
WordCamp 50+ attendees
10+ volunteers
5+ speakers (2+ women, 2+ new)
7 videos posted to wptv
75% positive survey results
As needed, usually between $5,000-50,000
Meetup event number of attendees
number of new attendees
number of videos posted to wptv
As needed, usually about $5/attendee
Contributor Day number of new contributors
number of bug reports
number of patches submitted
number of videos captioned
number of Codex pages edited
number of support tickets answered
number of themes reviewed
As needed, usually about $10/attendee
Hackathons (like do_action) number of participants
number of organizations helped/sites created?
% positive survey results
As needed, usually about $10/attendee
Training number of teachers
number of students
number of videos posted to wptv
number of edits submitted to training repo
As needed, usually about $10/attendee, plus hosting accounts as needed
WCUS/WCEU Viewing Party number of attendees As needed, usually $50-300 per group

Thoughts, complaints, obvious blind spots? Am I thinking too big? Too small? Let’s discuss in the comments and in our Community Team chat, tomorrow!

Do you screencast or make video tutorials of how to use WordPress? WordPress.tv wants you!

WordPress.tv is a great place to go to catch up on your favorite WordCamp sessions, or perhaps virtually attend a Camp you could not make in person. These videos are a great way to up your game and learn about WordPress, especially if you are an aspiring developer, or established user.

However, for new users to WordPress, one thing we don’t have on WordPress.tv is videos of how to do things directly in the dashboard of their site. These are more “just getting started” kinds of videos, centered around common tasks or goals, such as:

  • How to configure widgets
  • Setting up a custom menu
  • Managing comments
  • How to insert an image gallery

These kinds of videos would do a lot to help teach WordPress to a new generation of users, and are just the kind of videos we want to host on WordPress.tv! How do we get there? That’s where you come in… 🙂

Submit your WordPress screencasts and video tutorials to WordPress.tv!

Are you a proud member of the WordPress community, who creates (or would like to create) videos that are focused on helping others learn how to use WordPress? If you answered “yes” then we would love your help in submitting your videos to WordPress.tv, so we can share them with the world in our “how to” section here: http://wordpress.tv/category/how-to/

Ready to go? You can use this handy upload form to send your video for review: http://wordpress.tv/submit-video/

What makes a good screencast or video tutorial?

We find that the following guidelines are all important to keep in mind when creating effective training videos for others to learn from:

  • Shorter videos are better – 3 minutes or less is a good guideline.
  • Focus on a single topic or task for your videos
  • Clear audio – Make sure your voice is easy to hear and understand
  • Focus on the browser window
  • No self-promotion or logos in the video

That last bit bears some explaining. While we want you to be able to benefit from your work, WordPress.tv is a non-commercial community-run website; we can’t accept videos with watermarks, logos, or self-promotion of any kind. We do have a place for you to enter your WordPress.org profile name as a producer credit, so you will get noticed!

Here is an example of an existing (slightly out of date) screencast that meets all the above guidelines: http://wordpress.tv/2013/06/22/how-to-use-the-image-galleries/

So why not share the love, and help train a new generation the joys of using WordPress. Good karma (and a free copy of WordPress) will be your reward for helping out! Thanks!

– Your WordPress.tv Community Moderators (aka “The Mod Squad”)

#public-submission, #screencasting, #screencasts, #video-tutorials, #wordpress-tv, #wptv-mods

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“Consistency is the most overrated of all human virtues… I’m someone who changes his mind all the time.”
– Malcolm Gladwell

We published videos from WC Lyon, WC Seattle: Experienced Edition and WC London

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego – WC North Canton – WC Portland – WC Nashville and WC Miami videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • update on the post for screencast tutorials submissions
  • discussion about the S3 video transcoder
  • update on layout for @brashrebel‘s WPTV plugin

In The Last 7 Days

We published 9 videos from 3 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Ben Furfie: How to Value Price Websites

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Brad Williams: Hiring Employee Number One – From Freelancer to Agency

 

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“Anticipate the difficult by managing the easy.”
– Lao Tzu

We had 23 how-to videos submitted this week. No new WordCamp or WordPress Related Videos submitted this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego – WC North Canton – WC Portland – WC Nashville and WC Miami videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • updates on screencast tutorials for the WPTV Plugin – 23 submitted
  • discussion on how to tag the videos for the WPTV plugin
  • feedback on layout for @brashrebel‘s WPTV plugin

In The Last 7 Days

We published 43 videos from 4 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Kirk Wight: Fear in a Developer’s World

Eric Wolfe: Building a WordPress Theme Using AngularJS

 

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“Little one, I would like to see anyone – prophet, king or God – persuade a thousand cats to do anything at the same time.”
– Neil Gaiman (A cynical cat, in Sandman)

WC Montreal, WC London, WC Hamburg, WC Atlanta and WC Minneapolis submitted videos this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego – WC North Canton – WC Portland ME and WC Nashville videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • approving videos for a “WordPress Related Event”
  • issue with getting screencast videos for WPTV plugin
  • updates on progress of post-production for WC videos

In The Last 7 Days

We published 32 videos from 5 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Michelle Schulp: Beyond Whitespace – Designing for Complex Content

Christina Fuchs: Was sind Mitgliederseiten und wie lassen sie sich in WordPress realisieren?

 

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.”
– Alan Watts

WC Montreal, WC London and WC Minneapolis submitted videos this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego – WC North Canton – WC Portland ME and WC Nashville videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • updates on progress of post-production for WC videos
  • proposal to transcode videos using Amazon Elastic Transcoder
  • feedback on layout for @brashrebel‘s WPTV plugin
  • @bethsoderberg did a copy edit on documentation

In The Last 7 Days

We published 13 videos from 2 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Eric Wolfe: Building a WordPress Theme Using AngularJS

Barbara Schendel: Create Your Own WordPress Theme

 

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.”
– Henry Ford

WC Montreal, WC Atlanta and WC Minneapolis submitted videos this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego – WC North Canton videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • updates on progress of post-production for WC videos
  • the WPTV submit page uploader being slow
  • transcoding videos using Amazon Elastic Transcoder (upsides and downsides)
  • @brashrebel‘s patch that will display video producer credit on WPTV posts
  • submission guidelines for making videos for the WPTV plugin
  • welcome new mods @jshipc and @blondishnet

In The Last 7 Days

We published 17 videos from 3 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Christina Fuchs: Was sind Mitgliederseiten und wie lassen sie sich in WordPress realisieren?

Gene Hammett: Being an Authority in the WordPress Market Means More Impact and More Income

 

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“Well done is better than well said.”
– Benjamin Franklin

WC Atlanta, WC Dayton, WC Minneapolis and WC Seattle submitted videos this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC San Diego videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • editing the videos on the “videos to edit” page
  • process for creating videos for the WPTV plugin
  • update of the WPTV plugin (wiki and goals)

In The Last 7 Days

We published 14 videos from 5 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Mike Little: Running Multiple WordPress Sites Under NGINX

Mickey Mellen and Ali Green: Planning Your Website from Concept to Launch

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“Imagination is more important than knowledge.”
– Albert Einstein

WC Atlanta, WC Dayton and WC Hamburg submitted videos this week.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC Seattle – WC San Diego and WC Minneapolis videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

  • the plugin by @brashrebel that brings relevant videos from WPTV into the wp-admin.
  • the issues that need to be addressed for the plugin (relevant videos, getting existing videos tagged)
  • creating tags to help identify relevant content
  • creating new content for the plugin
  • feedback and input for the plugin https://github.com/brashrebel/wptv

In The Last 7 Days

We published 9 videos from 3 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Mike Little: Running Multiple WordPress Sites Under NGINX

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

Tom Tortorici: Awesome Images On Your WordPress Site

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv

WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update

“I think the person who takes a job in order to live – that is to say, for the money – has turned himself into a slave.”
– Joseph Campbell

Videos from WC Atlanta were submitted this week with a few more from WC Paris and WC Hamburg.

WC Lancaster – WC St Louis – WC Dayton – WC Seattle – WC San Diego videos are still in process.

In the Mod Chat we talked about:

In The Last 7 Days

We published 29 videos from 5 WordCamps and WordPress Related Events around the world.

The Top Three Most Viewed WordCamp Videos Last Week

Christina Fuchs: Was sind Mitgliederseiten und wie lassen sie sich in WordPress realisieren?

Heather Solos: 5 Plugins For List Building

Jenny Munn: SEO for 2015 – What’s In, What’s Out and How to Be In It to Win It (For Good)

#moderator-update, #wordpress-tv