Deputy Discussions: Raising Concerns and Resolving Issues

We have more deputies on the Global Community Team than ever before, which is so fantastic! And of course, when any group welcomes new members, people start to notice where behavior and communication norms were assumed, rather than explained.

In this post I’ll outline some of the communication paths within the Deputy group that may have only been assumed in the past. Hopefully this will help deputies feel confident when addressing problems that might arise during their work with local community organizers or other deputies.

They say “when you see something, say something…” but to whom? And how?

There’s a lot of work being done on the Global Community Team, and no wonder — there are more WordPress meetups and WordCamps than ever! Luckily, we’ve got more and more deputies involved to help train and support community organizers.

We’re all human, though, and we all make mistakes. Plus, community admin work includes a number of subjective decisions. If you notice that another deputy missed a possible issue when vetting an application, or you happen to notice a community grant is surprisingly low, etc., don’t just shrug and keep on going — check in!  Here’s how:

First, check in directly with the person who did the work. On this team, we strive to ask questions first, in an effort to understand why something happened in a certain way. (This is a great way to find out if your assumptions are correct! Sometimes they’re not!)

Once you’ve gathered additional context, if you think someone made a mistake — or you disagree with their decision — remember to deliver that feedback courteously. Critical feedback is shared with the intent to help your teammate avoid making a mistake again in the future, and should be carefully phrased to avoid hurt feelings.

I encourage everyone on this team to follow a call-in approach, rather than a call-out approach. Over the years, I’ve found it’s more effective to give my fellow contributors a chance to answer questions and correct mistakes by communicating directly and cooperatively.

Whenever possible, avoid the call-out approach with members of the local communities that you’re advising/supporting. If you’ve approached a local community organizer to raise a concern and your feedback didn’t have the result you expected, it’s not appropriate to complain about (or to) the organizer(s) in a public space. Your best next step is to ask another deputy for help in conveying your message more effectively or strategizing another approach.

I checked in with someone, and we just don’t agree. Now what?

We’re a big team! People take on this deputy role because they are passionate about the way WordPress community is built. Lots of strong opinions around can lead to differences of opinion, and that’s okay.

If you have a difference of opinion with another deputy that you haven’t been able to work through directly with that person, the next step is to reach out to another member of the team for advice and feedback. If you’re part of a deputy mentorship group, reach out to your mentor and get their opinion. If you don’t agree with your mentor, here are other highly experienced deputies you can contact for advice, a second opinion, or to raise a concern with:

@francina, @hlashbrooke, @kcristiano, @camikaos, @bph, @_dorsvenabili, @andreamiddleton

I just don’t like the decision that the team has agreed on. What should I do?

Pretty much everyone on the global community team, including me, disagrees with a few team practices or past decisions. If you’re really struggling with a situation and don’t feel that you’re getting anywhere after talking to other deputies — including multiple people on the above list — then… you’re probably pretty upset, and having a hard time. At this point, it’s time for a few reminders, and then a few questions.

Reminders:

  1. This isn’t emergency work.
  2. No one is perfect.
  3. It’s hard for any one person to know all our expectations and best practices.
  4. Everyone is trying to do what’s best for WordPress (even when we don’t agree on what that is).  

And those questions:

  1. Does the outcome of this decision have an effect on the well-being of participants? And will the outcome be noticeable to attendees in particular?
  2. What is my ultimate goal?
  3. Is there a fundamental conflict between my personal values or goals, and the expectations for my contributor role?
  4. Can I “disagree and commit” here, or do I need to step away from this role*? (Is this issue/problem so important to me that I can’t continue to work cooperatively on this team because of this decision?)  

*It’s always ok to take a break from contributor work for a short or long time, for any reason. If you need to step away from a role in which a lot of people depend on you, for any reason other than an emergency, please give the team as much notice as possible so your responsibilities can be handed off gracefully.  

Feedback

What do you think?

  1. Did I accurately describe the way people on this team aspire to communicate about and resolve conflicts or concerns, or did I miss something?
  2. Are there any steps or expectations here that you think are confusing, unnecessary, or unwise?

#deputies

The 4 “Gets” in WordPress Community Organizing

People all over the world want to organize WordPress community events, which is humbling and exciting. This comes with a lot of responsibility for the global community team, which carefully reviews all applications and vets all applicants, before moving forward with them. Part of the global community team’s process when vetting applications is to find out what motivates aspiring WordPress leaders to sign up for a lot of hard (but fun!) work — to ensure that the applicant’s goals fit well with the team’s goals.

The  community organizer handbooks have lots of public information about how we suggest people achieve these goals (what the organizers will “give”), but doesn’t outline very clearly what our volunteers can reasonably expect in return for their work (what the organizers will “get”). While everyone knows that WordPress is made possible through volunteer time, that doesn’t mean there is no reciprocity — for everything that someone gives, there are things that they also receive.

In this post, I’d like to start a conversation about how we can better clarify expectations for new and experienced contributors in our group. Here’s my first attempt at explicitly outlining our volunteers’ main “get”s.

What WordPress community organizers get (for all their hard work)

  1. Impact. WordPress community events are promoted by the WordPress project and tap into resources that other tech events don’t have — like being marketed on the WordPress dashboard. WordPress community event organizers choose the topics that are shared at monthly and annual events,  and who will lead those conversations. Your choices affect who will feel comfortable in the spaces where people connect. WordPress events change lives, and your choices define what kind of change might happen, and for whom.
  2. Growth. Volunteers are given opportunities based mainly on their interests, not their experience. WordPress community organizers aren’t required to have organized an event, or have managed a team, before taking on a leadership role in their local communities. WordPress community event organizers have the opportunity to develop a broad array of skills: leadership, communications, design, logistics, marketing, fundraising, management… the list goes on. Every one of these skills can create opportunities in someone’s professional career or personal life.
  3. Training/Support. Learning to organize WordPress community events is a very open process, and unusually short compared to many other global volunteer programs. All of our training, documentation, best practices, and tools are produced by experienced organizers. And when organizers run into problems they don’t know how to handle, there is a team of experienced helpers available, practically all the time.
  4. Protection. Back before 2011, WordPress community organizers took on a lot of risk in their work — more than any other WordPress contributor. Event organizers experienced financial loss, inquiries from tax authorities, lawsuits, and other life-damaging problems as a result of unexpected things happening at/due to their events. Our current fiscal & logistical infrastructure shields our volunteers from financial and legal risks they might suffer when organizing WordPress community events.

Those are some pretty great things you can expect when joining this courageous team of leaders! But there are things that no one gets, or that only come with time or experience — and it’s important to call those out too.

What WordPress community organizers don’t get (right away, and sometimes ever)

  1. Complete autonomy. Local organizers make a lot of powerful choices when creating events and building community. However, organizers aren’t free to pick and choose which meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. or WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. program expectations they follow through on. If you accept the WordPress community organizer role despite disagreeing with some parts of the program, you’re still expected to do the things that everyone is asked to do — they’re part of the job.
  2. Commit-level access. WordPress community organizers are full of bright ideas, which is a lot of what makes this project so great. Not every bright idea meshes well with WordPress community values or works on a global scale, though. The WordPress community programs — just like the WordPress open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. project as a whole — are open source, but they’re not “open commit.” Even if you are certain that your idea is a good one, it still might not work at a WordPress chapter meetup or WordCamp. By the way, there is a way to earn “commit-level access” on the community team — and it starts with becoming a community deputy.
  3. And other things.  There are other things, too, but those all come up in orientations and in our handbook (they’re outlined in the 5 Good Faith Rules for meetups, and Should You Be An Organizer? and Representing WordPress docs in the WordCamp organizer handbook). To summarize, it’s best not to try to establish a leadership position in WordPress for self-serving purposes, such as trying to make a profit off the local group or to promote your business or friends’ companies over other local businesses. Likewise, if your leadership approach includes hateful or very controlling behavior, this organization probably won’t be a good fit for you.

Share your thoughts

What do you think about this list of “get”s and “don’t get”s — does this help clarify the kind of personal return that contributors can reasonably expect for the time and attention they invest in our programs? What did you expect you’d get out of participating as a WordPress community organizer, and what did you actually get?

#community-expectations

Who wants to test the new WordCamp blocks?

The WordCamp.org GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ blocks that were discussed and designed some time back are now ready for betaBeta A pre-release of software that is given out to a large group of users to trial under real conditions. Beta versions have gone through alpha testing in-house and are generally fairly close in look, feel and function to the final product; however, design changes often occur as part of the process. testing!

Please note that currently Speaker, Session, Organizer and Sponsor blocks are available for testing. Development work on the schedule blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. is in progress, and will hopefully be available for testing in a month or so.

Beta testers, please report issues and bugs on Meta Trac or in the #meta-wordcamp channel on WordPress Slack.

Leave a comment on this post if you’re interested in testing these new tools on your WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. site. Thanks in advance for helping to improve our tools via testing and bug reports!

#blocks, #wordcamp-org

Organizer best practices: paths to leadership, or 11 ways to help your local meetup

As you all probably know, the global community team recommends a flat organizational structure for local WordPress community groups. Because open sourceOpen Source Open Source denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be redistributed and modified. Open Source **must be** delivered via a licensing model, see GPL. projects depend on a large, diverse group of contributors to collaborate and iterate quickly, we encourage that community organizers “always be recruiting” (and welcoming, and training) new leaders.

When there are lots of people with leadership experience in a community, local organizers can take more breaks and avoid burnout. As new leaders join the community, they bring new ideas, perspectives, and methods. Because organizers tend to organize for people like themselves, recruiting a diverse group of leaders is especially important — so that the community can take into account a broader spectrum of backgrounds, needs, interests, and lived experience.

OK sure but how?

Most people are on board with the *idea* of a large, diverse leadership team but struggle with recruiting. And that’s not really a surprise! Not all organizations are as open to new leaders as ours, so even constant repetition that “we’re always looking for more organizers” at every meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. event might not result in people stepping forward.

One way to make the recruitment process more gentle and perhaps less intimidating is to offer a gradual path to leadership. Many groups have found success with inviting people to help out with smaller, accessible tasks at first. Small contributions can lead to more complex jobs as the volunteer’s confidence and understanding of the group continues to grow.

Here are 11 ways to contribute to your local WordPress meetup, which can also serve as a graceful path to community leadership:

  1. spread the word about the meetup (sharing photos on social media, word of mouth, flyers, blog posts, etc)
  2. greet & welcome new attendees
  3. take attendance (if your group keeps a record of who actually attended the event)
  4. deliver opening or closing remarks (easier if the points to cover are written down)
  5. facilitate a round-table discussion
  6. give a presentation
  7. help find a free venue
  8. record & post a presentation to WordPress.tv
  9. organize refreshments
  10. suggest or recruit speakers
  11. organize an event series

Add to the list

Community organizers, speak out! What can meetup members do to help your group thrive, which aren’t listed above? What does the path to leadership look like in your home community?

Once we collect as many examples as possible, we can create a new Meetup Organizer Handbook page to share these suggestions with current and new Meetup organizers. Please share your ideas and experiences in a comment on this post!

#leadership, #meetups-2, #organizer-best-practices

Discussion: How could we improve the WordPress Community Summit?

tl;dr: Let’s brainstorm on how we can change the Community Summit event format to keep the benefits and reduce the pain points!

History and Background

The first WordPress Community Summit was organized in 2012, guided by the idea that face-to-face interactions in a safe space amongst a small number of contributors can help resolve conflicts that are deadlocked.

The stated purpose of the event was to

  • Build bridges between the people making WordPress (via the contributor groups) and the people doing the best and most influential work built on top of it
  • Open channels of communication between project leaders, volunteers, and professionals in the community
  • Learn more about each others’ goals, challenges, and ways we can help each other
  • Share best practices
  • Have some social time and get to know each other better

The event has always been invitation-only, to keep the discussion groups small enough that everyone could interact and participate. The smallest summit had around 200 attendees; the largest was around 350 attendees. Most of our community summits have included a travel assistance program to ensure that no invited contributor was unable to attend for financial reasons.

Results and Challenges

We’ve had 4 community summits, which have resulted in some really positive outcomes, including:

  • identification of shared goals and/or struggles
  • productive cross-team discussions
  • conflict resolutions (due to face-to-face interaction or “safe space” conversations? both? hard to tell)
  • stronger relationships between contributors who attended

Some of the pain points we’ve discovered include:

  • Invitation-only events are challenging — I’m tempted to say “excruciating” — for our community. The event is, by definition, not inclusive. Not being invited to a summit can be taken to mean, “I’m not important here,” which conflicts with the welcoming and egalitarian environment we value. When you organize an exclusive event like this, you are guaranteed to hurt a lot of feelings.
  • Selecting “the right people to invite” along with “the right topics to discuss” is very difficult. The method we’ve used most recently has been to ask contributor teams to identify the issues they need to discuss, which then defines the people who need to attend (to cut down on the “popularity contest” effect). But that means discussion topics are selected 3-6 months in advance, which can mean that difficult decisions are put on hold for longer than necessary.
  • We can’t depend on “fly everyone to the same place” as our primary way to make hard decisions or have productive conversations. For one thing, it’s really expensive (in cash money and in volunteer hours). It also sets artificial limits on how many brains we can focus on a problem or opportunity — only the people in the room can help with a problem that’s being addressed by a (relatively) small group of people.

Looking forward

Where do we go from here? Let’s get creative! I’d love your thoughts on this topic, especially on the following points:

  1. Is there anything missing from the above lists of benefits and pain points?
  2. Do you have suggestions of how WordPress can still enjoy the benefits of this kind of event, while eliminating or reducing the pain points?

To give the conversation some structure, let’s aim to close comments by March 15, 2019. #summit #discussion

Proposal: New content in the meetup organizer newsletter

We did a great job of sending consistent monthly newsletters to meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers in 2018 — great job to @psykro @hlashbrooke @adityakane and everyone else who drafted and sent newsletters last year!

This year, I was thinking it could be cool to broaden the scope of our monthly newsletters. I have two ideas, and would love you to share additional ideas in a comment on this post!

Organizer Tips & Training

First, I think it would be cool to include some “intermediate-level” training content to the newsletter. Community organizers get an orientation when they join our program, and can access our handbooks whenever… but we still don’t have any active “continuing education” opportunities to help organizers grow their skills.

Some intermediate-level topics that come to my mind include:

  • advantages to organizing simple events that are easy to replicate
  • recruiting volunteers through imperfection and transparency
  • communication tips for avoiding conflict in your community
  • organizing tasks that offer a gentle, accessible path to leadership
  • tips for welcoming newcomers to the group
  • responding to suggestions and criticism
  • tips for recruiting new speakers
  • responding to people offering to speak, especially when their proposal isn’t interesting
  • different ways to handle all-group communication

Here’s how I’m envisioning the execution of this idea:

  1. At the beginning of every month, we publish a little summary of some pre-existing knowledge on a topic like the ones above. The article should include a call for suggestions or feedback, so that other community organizers can share their thoughts or experiences in this area. Hopefully this provides a chance to connect with other WordPress community organizers!
  2. Mid-month, the person writing the newsletter includes a summary of the discussion-so-far in the newsletter text, and encourages organizers to check out the whole thread on make/community.
  3. At the end of the month, we gather all the suggestions and ideas into a handbook page. If we can do this consistently, we’ll have at least 10 more pages of useful handbook content by the end of this year! Wow!

If it proves too challenging to add the accumulated content to the handbook every month, that could be a nice, no-expertise-required task for new contributors at a contributor dayContributor Day Contributor Days are standalone days, frequently held before or after WordCamps but they can also happen at any time. They are events where people get together to work on various areas of https://make.wordpress.org/ There are many teams that people can participate in, each with a different focus. https://2017.us.wordcamp.org/contributor-day/ https://make.wordpress.org/support/handbook/getting-started/getting-started-at-a-contributor-day/..

Contributor Team Spotlight

Many people, WordPress community organizers included, don’t know much about all the other contributor teams that do cool stuff to help WordPress flourish. To address this, we could do a monthly Contributor Team Spotlight, with a little information about the goals of the team, when they meet in SlackSlack Slack is a Collaborative Group Chat Platform https://slack.com/. The WordPress community has its own Slack Channel at https://make.wordpress.org/chat/., links to their team blog and handbook, and how you can get involved if you want to help.

This might be a little harder to pull together, as it requires some cross-team outreach, but maybe someone here will feel passionate about this idea? 😉

Execution would be pretty simple, just post a paragraph with all that information on the monthly “Anything to add to the newsletter this month?” post.

Feedback?

  1. Does this seem like a good idea?
  2. Are there any other organizer tips or intermediate-level topics you would like to see us discuss/add?
  3. What teams could we most easily spotlight in the newsletter?
  4. Is there any other content you think we should add to the monthly newsletter?

Leave your ideas, concerns, and any other feedback in a comment on this post!

Increase in WordCamp maximum ticket price for 2019

After a thoughtful discussion earlier this year, it’s nearly unanimous that time (and inflation) has caught up with the $20/pp/day price cap for WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. tickets.

In 2019, the maximum ticket price for WordCamps will be $25/pp/day, or 25% higher than the current price for WordCamps that don’t use USD.

A few reminders:

  • This is a maximum price. WordCamps can charge less than $25 per person, per day.
  • The ticket price does not reflect on the value of the event. WordPress is free and priceless at the same time — and in an ideal world, WordCamps would also be free. We set ticket prices as low as possible, to minimize the attendee no-show rate, while keeping the event accessible to anyone, regardless of financial resources.

All WordCamps scheduled for 2019 can change their ticket prices (or not) as of January 1, 2019.

At the end of 2019, we’ll look at the no-show rate for WordCamps worldwide and see if this slight price increase has had any effect. If we don’t see any improvement, we can discuss whether another price increase might be worth trying.  🙂

Shameless plug: It’s super-useful for WordCamps to track attendance on their WordCamp sites, because it contributes to wiser decisions in local communities as well as on a global basis. 🙂 So please remember to track attendance!

If you have any questions, doubts, or feedback, please leave a comment on this post! 🙂

Proposed 2019 Global Community Sponsorship Program

Below you’ll find a proposed draft for the 2019 Global Community Sponsorship Program.

tl;dr:

Rates increase by about 10% this year, across the board.

Benefits we’d like to remove:

  • Dedicated tweet announcing sponsorship from the Twitter account of each WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. (this is included in every local package anyway, so why duplicate in the global packages)
  • Event-unique “trackable link” (purl) in your sponsor description (this was not important to sponsors last year)

Two benefits we’d like to add:

  • “Featured” acknowledgement on two meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizer newsletters per year (received by 1200+ organizers) — Gold
  • Listing on resource page for new user workshops/charity hackathons organized by meetups or at WordCamps — Gold & Silver

And one experiment:

We propose offering a Global Subscriber package for $2000/year.

Global Subscribers would receive an email notification every time:

  • a meetup group is added to the WordPress chapter program
  • a WordCamp is added to the pre-planning schedule
  • a WordCamp is added to the official schedule

Questions? Feedback?

The actual program description is quite long, so I wanted to make the call for feedback a little earlier. 🙂 If you have any questions, observations, or critical feedback about the program in general or these proposed changes, please comment on this post! Thanks so much for the hard work, input, and feedback by @kcristiano, @lucasartoni, @kenshino, @laryswan, and @radolina!

Continue reading

WordPress meetup organizer newsletter: October 2018

Howdy WordPress meetupMeetup All local/regional gatherings that are officially a part of the WordPress world but are not WordCamps are organized through https://www.meetup.com/. A meetup is typically a chance for local WordPress users to get together and share new ideas and seek help from one another. Searching for ‘WordPress’ on meetup.com will help you find options in your area. organizers!

Welcome to another meetup organizer newsletter full of news, information and inspiration for your local meetup.

Newsletter contents:

  • Preparing for WordPress 5.0
  • Diversity Outreach Speaker Training for Meetups
  • WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. Viewing Parties

Preparing for WordPress 5.0

Earlier this month, the schedule for rolling out WordPress 5.0 (including GutenbergGutenberg The Gutenberg project is the new Editor Interface for WordPress. The editor improves the process and experience of creating new content, making writing rich content much simpler. It uses ‘blocks’ to add richness rather than shortcodes, custom HTML etc. https://wordpress.org/gutenberg/ – the new blockBlock Block is the abstract term used to describe units of markup that, composed together, form the content or layout of a webpage using the WordPress editor. The idea combines concepts of what in the past may have achieved with shortcodes, custom HTML, and embed discovery into a single consistent API and user experience. editor) was announced: https://make.wordpress.org/core/2018/10/03/proposed-wordpress-5-0-scope-and-schedule/

This puts the releaseRelease A release is the distribution of the final version of an application. A software release may be either public or private and generally constitutes the initial or new generation of a new or upgraded application. A release is preceded by the distribution of alpha and then beta versions of the software. date for WordPress 5.0 less than a month away, on November 19, 2018. With that in mind, this is a great time to talk to your meetup group about Gutenberg, WordPress 5.0, and what people can expect from it all.

As meetup organizers, you are uniquely positioned to help guide your community through what is promising to be a very significant coreCore Core is the set of software required to run WordPress. The Core Development Team builds WordPress. update. To help prepare your community, share some Gutenberg resources with them, organise a meetup where you demo and discuss the new editor, or gather your community for a work-along so you can learn about the new editor together.

If you discover a bug or have a suggestion for improvement, please log an issue here: https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg/issues/

Diversity Outreach Speaker Training for Meetups

We know of 15 Meetups or WordCamps who have run the workshop for getting new speakers to step up, particularly women and other underrepresented groups, in 2018.

We are pretty sure there are more groups out there which have run this training, so if you haven’t been in contact with us, please let us know at: speaker-training@wordcamp.org

Have you not yet run a workshop, but you’re interested in doing so? The workshop information is here: http://diversespeakers.info/

Would you like help from us to run it? We are holding a training on Saturday, October 27.

Write to us to sign up for this or find out about future training sessions here: http://tiny.cc/wpwomenspeak

Event Format Spotlight: WordCamp Viewing Party

Many WordCamps stream their content live all over the world, making it a great opportunity to get your local community together to watch it. If you can’t travel to a WordCamp, then the live stream is a great way to share in the content of the event along with other local WordPress enthusiasts.

The basic requirements for hosting a live stream party are an internet connection and a computer. To help you out we have created an event template on meetup.com titled “WordCamp Live Stream Party” — you can use that to create and schedule your event for any WordCamp. Additionally, if you need to rent a venue for a WordCamp viewing party, you can apply for financial assistance by making a Meetup Venue Approval Request.

The next WordCamp that will live streaming their content is WordCamp US coming up on November 7-9. WordCamp US includes Matt Mullenweg’s annual State of the WordState of the Word This is the annual report given by Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress at WordCamp US. It looks at what we’ve done, what we’re doing, and the future of WordPress. https://wordpress.tv/tag/state-of-the-word/. address, which is always a treat! Stay tuned to their website for live stream details as they are announced: https://2018.us.wordcamp.org/

That’s it for now — chat to you next time!

– Your friends on the Community Team

make.wordpress.org/community

#newsletter

Call for Volunteers: 2019 Global Sponsorship Working Group

Do you love looking at spreadsheets, balance sheets, PNLs, and budget projections? Do you really know your way around a sponsorship deck? If the answer to either (or both!) of these questions is, “YES!” then you might be interested in joining the 2019 global sponsorship working group.

The WordPress Global Sponsorship Program (born in 2013 as the Multi-Event Sponsorship Program), provides financial support to WordPress community events around the world. It’s time to analyze the program yet again and come up with a proposal for the 2019 edition.

We’d like to post a proposal for the 2018 Global Sponsorship Program no later than November 7, hoping to be able to send it to sponsors by November 14. I’d like to gather a group of 5-7 people to work on this short project. @kcristiano and I will be two of the people in the group, so we’re looking for an additional 3-5 volunteers.

Time commitment: 2-4 hours of independent program analysis time plus two 1-hour video conference meetings, all between October 22-Nov 2.

Experience required: accounting experience with organizations with an annual gross income of $4M and over AND/OR experience analyzing/reviewing multiple sponsorship decks per year. WordCampWordCamp A WordCamp is a conference where the WordPress community come together to teach one another what they’ve learned throughout the year and share the joy. https://central.wordcamp.org/about/. fundraising experience is also strongly preferred.

If you have skills/experience and the interest/time, please comment on this post! We’ll announce the working group members by October 17, and I’ll reach out on October 19 to group members to schedule the two video meetings. #global-sponsorship