Digital Accessibility Centre Visit – Part 3: The Blind Perspective

This is the third post documenting a recent visit to Digital Accessibility Centre in Neath, South Wales organised by fellow team member Siobhan BamberThe first post can be found here, and the second post here.

Three of the staff from DAC gave us feedback on using the WordPress admin screens. Each of the three have a particular impairment, and the visit was a valuable opportunity to learn about ways we could improve WordPress for everyone.

In this post we take feedback from Carly who is totally blind. She showed us how she used a screen reader and gave us some great feedback on using the WordPress admin screens with a screen reader.

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#accessibility, #assistive-technology, #feedback, #jaws-admin, #screen-reader, #testing, #trac-2

Digital Accessibility Centre Visit – Part 2: Poor Vision

This is the second post (of three) documenting a recent visit to Digital Accessibility Centre in Neath, South Wales organised by fellow team member Siobhan Bamber. The first post can be found here.

Three of the staff from DAC gave us feedback on using the WordPress admin screens. Each of the three have a particular impairment, and the visit was a valuable opportunity to learn about ways we could improve WordPress for everyone.

In this post we take feedback from Gary who has poor vision.

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#accessibility, #colour-contrast, #feedback, #testing, #text-resize

Digital Accessibility Centre Visit – Part 1: Introduction, Keyboard and Dragon Testing

On February 25th 2014 I was honoured to visit the offices of the Digital Accessibility Centre in Neath, South Wales, UK. The trip was organised by fellow wpa11y team member Siobhan Bamber.

This post is the first in a series of three which summarise the feedback we received on using WordPress from three users with impairments. Our first session was with Becs who uses Dragon NaturallySpeaking (voice recognition software) and does keyboard accessibility testing.

 

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#accessibility, #assistive-technology, #feedback, #keyboard, #voice-recognition

Welcome to the Make WordPress Accessible Team

Hello. You’ve found the blog of the Make WordPress Accessible team – a bunch of volunteers who are striving to improve the accessibility of WordPress. We need your help.

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#accessibility, #feedback

Feedback on #21334: Row actions are not always keyboard accessible

I’ve made two commits so far to address the fact that row actions (that is, edit/quick edit/trash under each post’s title) only show on hover. I have two questions regarding this that I could your expertise on:

1. In terms of CSS, this is controlled by the visibility property. My understanding has been that visibility: hidden does not get read by screen readers. If this is the case, then we may want to use an alternative method for show/hide. Are these row actions currently in a state where they are useful to screen readers or are they better off not being read (for now)?
2. Right now the keyboard tabbing will only trigger them to show when in the same cell. Should this expand to whenever focus is within the row? I believe visually it is when hovering on the table row.

Thanks!

#core-2, #feedback

Accessible Polls and Surveys

We are always looking at ways to increase feedback from disabled users of WordPress. The more we know about the issues that people face every day, the more we can advocate for positive changes.

We also appreciate that it can be very daunting to post a comment on a blog like this one. So we would like to look at using short surveys and simple polls as a way of allowing people to give us their feedback as simply and as easily as possible. That, however, raises a whole new set of potential problems. We need to ensure that whatever tools we do use are as accessible as possible.

This where you come in.

Please tell us about any accessible survey and poll applications that you know of.

#feedback

Site Feedback Request

We have been approached by the folks over at translate.wordpress.org. They are keen to ensure that it is accessible as possible and would like our help to identify any problems with the current site.

So please take a little time, between May 17 & May 31, to have a look at translate.wordpress.org and give us your feedback via comments on this post. In order to support you and provide some structure to the feedback, we’ve prepared a Site Feedback Guide that should help.

We look forward to your contributions.

#feedback, #screen-reader, #testing

Accessibility for Theme Developers

As part of the larger WordPress documentation project, I’ve put together a very rough first draft of an accessibility section for the theme developers’ handbook. It still needs a lot of fleshing out as I’m approaching this from the perspective of someone who doesn’t know anything about web accessibility. So I feel that we need to not only tell theme developers what to do but how and why.

That said, is the draft missing anything major — bearing in mind that we do not want to overwhelm theme developers?

#feedback, #theme

We now have a form that allows assistive…

We now have a form that allows assistive technology users to send us their feedback via email. My guess is that not everyone is comfortable contributing to a public discussion here. Longer term, I’m also hoping that we can build up a pan-disability panel of users who would be willing to help with testing.

#feedback, #testing