WordPress.org

Make WordPress Accessible

Updates from April, 2014 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Joe Dolson 6:24 pm on April 28, 2014 Permalink
    Tags:   

    Update on WordCamp accessibility planning 

    I had a great conversation with Andrea Middleton at WordCamp Minneapolis this weekend, and we’re making some plans to work on the core accessibility features that WordCamp organizers will need to pay attention to in building their sites.

    Some of the key tasks will include working through the accessibility issues in the base themes available for WordCamp organizers to build from, providing some documentation to help organizers know what design standards they need to meet, and doing some basic training on checking their work.

     
  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 6:17 am on April 26, 2014 Permalink  

    Accessibility Team Update: April 23, 2014 

    Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines Testing

    Jeanne Spellman (http://www.w3.org/People/jeanne/), W3C, joined us for the meeting to discuss the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) testing we will be doing on trunk starting May 12. ATAG testing is, in part, useful for guiding development of accessible “software for generating websites, for example, content management systems (CMS).”

    ATAG Overview

    The Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Overview explains how ATAG testing will:

    • help make authoring tools themselves accessible, so that people with disabilities can create web content, and
    • help authors create more accessible web content — specifically: enable, support, and promote the production of content that conforms to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

    ATAG Testing Harness

    The W3C is developing an automated way to deliver ATAG test instructions and test result tracking and reports. It will also display WCAG test instructions and techniques, where applicable. In the the overall test instructions doc that was used when developing the tests there are general instructions at the top, followed by a table with the ATAG success criteria, and the test(s) for each one. As we are testing to WCAG level AA so will we be testing to ATAG level AA.

    Process

    Jeanne has about 15 volunteer testers. Thank you Jeanne! She explained the process: “We set up a page of accessible content, and a page of inaccessible content. Then we have a page of different types of content – video, audio, tables. Some of the ATAG tests check to see if WordPress breaks accessible content, while others see if WordPress fixes inaccessible content.” We discussed access to a test instance of WordPress trunk which is ready to go thanks to Rian Rietveld. There is no estimate as to how long the testing will take since it is a new process.

    Helping WordPress and the W3C

    This process will help improve WordPress and it will also help make ATAG 2.0 a finalized W3C standard. We are testing to WCAG level AA so we will be testing to ATAG level AA which will help the W3C process. Jeanne explained: “The writing is all done, and now we just need to prove to W3C management that there are 2 real world examples of every success criteria and 5 authoring tools have implemented ATAG level A.  AA is a huge bonus.”

    Accounts and Trac

    We noted that the volunteer testers will all need WordPress accounts. Aaron Jorbin very thoughtfully posted the core handbook link to working with trac and opening a ticket. Joe Dolson noted that: “It (testing) doesn’t have to be finished to be able to create tickets – we should be ticketing every discovery as we move forward.” The W3C team will be able to pull reports of all the errors from the testing harness tool which should facilitate the process.

     
  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 6:10 pm on April 18, 2014 Permalink  

    Accessibility Team Update: April 16, 2014 

    Team Member Thanks

    Thanks all the other teams who participated in making WordPress 3.9 happen and who reached out to the accessibility team for assistance. Many more people are asking us to check things than ever before. Special thanks to accessibility team members David A. Kennedy, Graham Armfield, and Joe Dolson who are mentioned in the 3.9 credits.

    Weekly Meeting Time

    There’s always confusion when the time changes and I regret that I compounded the confusion by being confused myself. I’m now using StatusClock.app by Pulsely for OS X set to GMT/UTC so I’ll be sure to call the weekly meeting to order at 19:00 UTC.

    Previous Test

    When the accessibility team did the last round of testing it was intended that it be done over a short period of time, but due to various factors it spread out over two months. That was a keyboard-only test because we were certain that, given our resources, we could not finish a full test. It turns out we could not finish even the attenuated test in a reasonable amount of time. This was not the intended outcome but I learned that we need many more testers to perform the testing in an effective manner. This is why I was very glad to make a testing plan with Jeanne Spellman of the W3C when we were at the International Technology and Persons With Disabilities Conference a month ago.

    New Test Round

    Jeanne Spellman of the W3C, the team contact for the User Agent Working Group and the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines Working Group (AUWG), has committed to helping us test WordPress trunk using the Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG). Jeanne has assembled a good number of volunteers to do the testing and they will file tickets or bump things up to me as soon as they have identified an issue. This time I feel confident that with current team members providing guidance the W3C team will be able to accomplish the task in a short enough period of time to be most effective. Testing is now scheduled to start the week of May 12, 2014.

    ATAG

    For those not familiar with ATAG, it is primarily for developers of authoring tools including software for generating websites such as content management systems. There are two areas of focus: making sure that the authoring tool user interface is accessible, and that the authoring tool supports the production of accessible content. Just as with WCAG 2.0, ATAG has three levels of success criteria in order of increasing compliance: A, AA, and AAA. We are testing to WCAG 2.0 level AA so it follows that the ATAG testing will also be done to level AA. ATAG testing will help us discover the issues we need to address next. ATAG at a Glance provides a short summary of the accessibility principles and guidelines in ATAG 2.0.

     
  • Joe Dolson 9:02 pm on April 15, 2014 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Update on accessibility-ready theme tag 

    We’re gradually working the kinks out of the process. There was an oversight in the automated process that added the accessibility-ready keyword to themes, so that only new themes were automatically getting the keyword, and not updated themes that added it. That’s been fixed, which will improve our ability to note themes that need to go through the review process.

    There’s a lot of support for the process, and the theme review team is invested in making this work, but I could use some backup in actually doing the reviews. Even if you don’t have the accessibility background, let me know if you’re interested: I’m happy to provide training to make sure you’ve got the knowledge it takes to do this review.

     
    • David A. Kennedy 4:00 pm on April 16, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      @joedolson I can help out with this once I finish up a few other projects. It’s a good place for me to contribute since it’s theme-centric. Feel free to reach out to me with details on how to get started.

c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
shift + esc
cancel
Skip to toolbar