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Updates from September, 2013 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 4:07 am on September 30, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , meeting notes,   

    Most of the time was spent discussing https://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/21334 3.7, grahamarmfield->helen, closed, Row actions are not always keyboard accessible. Helen Hou joined us for the discussion.

    1. When mouse hovers over a page/post row in main Pages/Posts screen ‘quick links’ appear. Suggesting that they also are made available for keyboard-only users and screen reader users.

    2. When using the QuickEdit panel the time/date controls have separate tabindex and no labels. Suggesting that the tabindex be removed from those controls, and that labels be used.

    Discussion centered around the need to reduce verbosity for screen reader users, while still making the controls available to them.

    It was decided to test the latest build and come back with a recommendation.

     
    • Graham Armfield 6:48 pm on October 1, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’ve tested the fix with the latest (I believe) version of NVDA and the quick links become accessible when focus is on the Post/Page Title. So that’s good. They are also not all listed by screen readers when the Posts/Pages list first appears.

  • Helen Hou-Sandi 9:21 pm on September 24, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    Feedback on #21334: Row actions are not always keyboard accessible 

    I’ve made two commits so far to address the fact that row actions (that is, edit/quick edit/trash under each post’s title) only show on hover. I have two questions regarding this that I could your expertise on:

    1. In terms of CSS, this is controlled by the visibility property. My understanding has been that visibility: hidden does not get read by screen readers. If this is the case, then we may want to use an alternative method for show/hide. Are these row actions currently in a state where they are useful to screen readers or are they better off not being read (for now)?
    2. Right now the keyboard tabbing will only trigger them to show when in the same cell. Should this expand to whenever focus is within the row? I believe visually it is when hovering on the table row.

    Thanks!

     
    • PhilippeVay 12:28 pm on September 25, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi,

      both display: none; and visibility: hidden; aren’t read by screen readers, that’s correct. There are now other CSS techniques that will also hide content but not on all screen readers (ex: height: 0).
      The well-named WP class .visually-hidden will move content off viewport so it’s still read by screen readers but not visible to sighted users with CSS activated: it’d be a good alternative to hide content only to sighted users.
      Useful or not here? I haven’t been active on WP for a while so I’ll have to take a look to these actions first 🙂

      Concerning keyboard and hiding content: I think there are 3 categories of disabled people that have different needs and habits.

      • blind people will use keyboard and a screen reader,
      • low vision people may use mouse and/or keyboard and a screen reader or not. The four combinations are possible
      • motor impaired will probably use a keyboard but no screen reader

      Screen reader may access rich information in an accessible table (related to header cells of a particular cell via scope – or id/headers – attributes) even if a link or button is off viewport while motor impaired wouldn’t be able to interact with this same table. So I think it’d be better to show all actions in the current row if one of the links has taken focus.

    • Joe Dolson 2:58 pm on September 25, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I generally agree with Philippe.

      Keyboard tabbing should trigger the links, I think, whenever focus is in the row; that will maximize awareness of these options. It’s not critically necessary, but when it comes to being able to find and understand the options, this will be the better solution.

      For screen readers, just using the visually-hidden solution, so that the links are always available for screen reader users is, in my opinion, the best solution. It does run into the repetitive-link problem, but I honestly think that in this user interface that’s not really an issue; it will be more valuable to be able to have those links available in context.

    • Helen Hou-Sandi 2:02 am on September 26, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks so much for the quick feedback – based on the IRC chat, it seems that the solution that is in the current nightly might actually be for the best, due to lack of context for screen readers and the sheer number of links that would appear. Perhaps things can be improved in the future for screen readers in this regard, although these links are convenience and not exclusive to the area. For 3.7, let’s focus on getting it just right for keyboard tabbing. We actually need to get this done in the next couple days, so I look forward to any further feedback, but do note that there’s a chance that further improvements will have to wait until 3.8 if this drags on.

    • _Redd 7:23 pm on September 27, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi Helen, from what I can tell from running a very brief test, the quick links menu is available upon the first visit to the post, and it allows you to get into the quick edit menu and perform edits, but once that takes place, the quick edit menu disappears and is no longer available to a screen reader (at least NVDA).

      Would you like access to my test site?

    • _Redd 8:36 pm on September 27, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m sorry, Helen, I forgot to include an example of what I’m talking about. Here is the link to the site.

      Once again, we are all really appreciative of what you’re doing for us. You are the BEST!

  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 2:55 am on September 21, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    IRC Meeting: September 18, 2013 

    Accessibility Statement Final Draft

    “Accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible.” Cynthia Waddell

    WordPress is founded on the principles of an inclusive community and democratization of publishing. The development of WordPress, based on standards and best practices, offers a constantly improving environment with flexibility and choice. We promise to always work toward creating an environment accessible to as many people as possible, inclusive of technology and ability.

    We want community involvement and welcome feedback. Your comments help us enhance the accessibility of WordPress.

    Resources

    End Accessibility Statement

    Projects To Be Followed

    During the remainder of the meeting we discussed the projects we believe should be followed by the WordPress Accessibility Team. We agreed that we have too few people on the team to follow all these projects, but we compiled the following list.

     
  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 9:21 pm on September 11, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , ,   

    IRC Meeting: September 11, 2013 

    We edited an accessibility statement.

    At the head of the statement is a quote by Cynthia Waddell: “Accessibility is the degree to which a product, device, service, or environment is available to as many people as possible.”

    [Then comes the statement:]

    WordPress is founded on the principles of an inclusive community and democratization of publishing. The development of WordPress, based on standards and best practices, offers a constantly improving environment with flexibility and choice. We promise to always work toward creating an environment accessible to as many people as possible, inclusive of technology and ability.

    [The statement is followed by resources and contact information.]

    Resources are available if you would like to learn more about WordPress accessibility.

    We want community involvement and welcome feedback. Your comments help us enhance the accessibility of WordPress.

    [Contact us here, and here, etc.]

     
  • Joseph Karr O'Connor 3:36 pm on September 5, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    IRC Meeting: September 4, 2013 

    Yesterday’s meeting focused almost entirely on developing a global accessibility statement for WordPress. It was decided that the statement should be broad in nature, and that it will generally support accessibility with links to more specific information that this group maintains.

    The voluntary accessibility theme check process was mentioned, that process is nearly ready to launch.

    Much thanks to Mel Pedley @esmi for her guidance and leadership as team representative for the past 18 months. I will now serve as team representative.

    You can also contact us with words of encouragement or feedback on Twitter @WPAccessibility.

     
    • Amy Hendrix (sabreuse) 4:01 pm on September 5, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      So many thanks to @esmi for all the work repping this group! And congrats/welcome aboard, Joe!

    • _Redd 6:00 pm on September 5, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Congratulations to Joe! I know we will all benefit from your presence here, as so many have already benefited from your other contributions to WordPress, such as your amazing Cities Themes project. And, I don’t have words strong enough or big enough to thank @esmi for her presence in the Accessibility blog. I think she was the first person I “met” in this group, and probably the one who figured most prominently in my education for accessibility in WordPress. She’s done more good than she knows. I have many times called attention to her input on these blogs and in the forums to others, and the guidance she provided, in turn, has impacted many websites for the better. Mel, we all can’t thank you enough.

  • esmi 12:39 pm on September 2, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: ,   

    IRC Meeting: August 28, 2013 

    The main focus of the meeting ( and the group) was still on one of our primary objectives — the development of a global accessibility statement for WordPress. After reviewing Drupal’s accessibility statement again, it was decided to begin work on drafting our own statement that can then be presented to the wider community for discussion.

    (More …)

     
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