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  • Lance Willett 5:15 pm on May 9, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    We’re getting very close This week focusing on… 

    We’re getting very close.

    This week focusing on RTL again, especially concerning :before and :after and Genericon placement, see #24287. Turns out we’ll need flipped versions of lots of the glyphs—which Joen is now working on. After Joen completes the Genericons font updates are ready we’ll sync them into Twenty Thirteen.

    Next is another quick pass at editor styles, including RTL support there.

     
  • Lance Willett 4:25 pm on April 23, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update, April 23, 2013 

    The focus for Twenty Thirteen right now test, test, and test. Polish, polish, and polish. The IEs, RTL, testing with lots of popular plugins. Getting things working smoothly with the new core post formats functionality.

    Priorities

     
  • Lance Willett 6:37 pm on April 8, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    We love testers

    We’d love more people to install Twenty Thirteen, with special emphasis on trying out all the new Post Format features.

    Also, if you have access to Windows with various versions of Internet Explorer we especially need help testing out some IE8 and IE10 issues (see Trac list link below).

    Priorities

    • Address open tickets in Trac, fix bugs and make improvements
    • More browser, device, RTL, and i18n testing
    • Post formats testing. For example, looking at the output from post_formats_compat(), making suggestions like Image should use wp_get_attachment_image() there for filters and correct core class attribute values in the resulting HTML.
    • Review and possibly refactor the js/functions.js JavaScript file, going to all procedural/functional or moving to a new architecture—the key is to be consistent with it within the file. We can also look at namespacing the events.
    • Ask Joen to do another design audit, checking versus his design vision for things like spacing, colors, and post formats.

    Office hours

    We’ll get back to office hours in #wordpress-dev IRC over the next few weeks, Tue and Thu at 17 UTC.

     
    • celloexpressions 1:40 am on April 9, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can’t make it to the office hours, but want to point out a couple more IE 8 issues that may or may not be ticket-worthy. The headings are displaying in Georgia font, but Bitter should work for IE 8. It’s fine on 9 and 10.

      Also, the header image is zoomed in in IE 8. See both issues in these screenshots (emulating 8/9 with 10): http://celloexpressions.com/nh/twenty-thirteen-fonts-ie8.png, http://celloexpressions.com/nh/twenty-thirteen-fonts-ie9.png.

      By the way, is IE 7 supposed to be supported/should it be tested?

    • ziegenberg 3:00 pm on April 9, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Here’s a WP 3.6 with (slightly altered – just colors) Twenty Thirteen. Working great so far!

      http://zubau.at

      • Lance Willett 9:53 pm on April 10, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Thanks for the link—cool color scheme! I’m seeing a few bugs in the comment form layout, though. Will need to debug and fix soon.

    • lisafirke 2:20 pm on April 15, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love the brave new look of TwentyThirteen– I’m working on a child theme for my personal blog… (It’s live but on the QT so I’m not too worried about glitches at this point).

      A few issues I’ve seen… with the fixed navbar, the header image I hacked/inserted into the masthead overlays and hangs below the bar. I know I can turn this behavior off by commenting out the JS but it may be an example of a use case that your more dive-into-the-code users will encounter. (I wanted that image to scale, which is why I inserted it as I have…)

      Other notes: I couldn’t get the JetPack carousel to work with the gallery post format as it does on the demo. Not sure if I just missed a step or if it’s not hooked into the theme correctly.

      The Status post format looks odd with an image floated left on the post… I nixed the background dotted line, but the Genericon (or whatever is producing the horizontal bar glyph in place of the title) is kind of distracting, too.

      Here’s the link: http://lisafirke.com/blog

      Looking forward to rolling out the finished version with much fanfare…

      • Lance Willett 5:38 pm on April 15, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Hi there, and thanks for your notes. The fixed navbar + inserted HTML image isn’t a bug we’ll fix in the core theme—that’s a great example of child themes adjusting and changing how the core theme works.

        We’ll investigate Jetpack Carousel and the Status post format left-aligned image a bit more.

        • Lance Willett 5:29 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Lisa: can you give more info on the Jetpack Carousel issues you had? I couldn’t repeat—seems to be working normally with all the various “types” of galleries in Jetpack.

          • lisafirke 9:12 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

            See my notes below. I think it’s a jquery/Jetpack glitch of some kind, because others are reporting similar issues with Jetpack.

            The main thing is, with Jetpack enabled, I’m still not seeing any formatting options for the carousel–I only have the ability to toggle from slideshow to grid on a gallery post.

            • Jeremy Herve 10:29 am on April 17, 2013 Permalink

              You’re probably right. We know of some conflicts between jQuery 1.9.1 and Jetpack Carousel, and we”ll get this fixed before 3.6 ships.

              See this ticket for more details about the conflict.

      • Lance Willett 4:40 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Hi again Lisa, to get rid of the horizontal bar glyph for Status posts, look for:

        .format-status .entry-content p:first-child:before
        

        And either change or comment it out in your child theme.

      • jrbeilke 5:28 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        lisa was there a specific browser that you were having trouble with the JetPack carousel?

        I’ve got 3.6 beta on my blog and loaded up a carousel post with JetPack slideshow ok.

    • lisafirke 7:25 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m using Safari and the latest beta build. I fixed a javascript error that was preventing the slideshow from running, but I don’t see any way to enable a full-screen slideshow. Here’s my test post: http://lisafirke.com/blog/2013/carousel-test/

      • lisafirke 7:29 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’m thinking the problem lies with Jetpack and not with TwentyThirteen?

        • lisafirke 8:18 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I disabled my test, so don’t bother clicking through. Only the background color and exif field data items are getting displayed as configuration options–and in the media ui no choice of carousels or any other configurables beyond “slideshow” versus “grid”.

    • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 8:02 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      There are posts in Alpha/Beta about 2013 – http://wordpress.org/support/forum/alphabeta

      (look for the ones that aren’t resolved)

      • Lance Willett 8:55 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Thanks, triaged 3 of the unresolved ones (1 was not related to Thirteen specifically).

        • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 9:58 pm on April 16, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Shirley :) Is there a good way to report them or flag them for you? I don’t know enough about what is and isn’t a theme decision (seriously, I hate debugging themes!) to feel comfortable raising tickets.

          Also if you’re not a forum mod, I’ll make you one so you can resolve those posts too ;)

    • Jeremy Herve 10:37 am on April 17, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      As discussed yesterday during office hours, I tested 2013 against Jetpack Trunk, and found 2 issues, that we will have to fix in Jetpack before 2013 is released.

      Infinite Scroll seems to work fine, whether you use footer widgets or not. All widgets seem to be displayed properly, although I haven’t tested in IE.

      No problems with post formats either. There were some conflicts between Jetpack Shortcodes and the new Audio shortcode, but it was fixed in r696694-plugins.

  • Lance Willett 9:09 pm on March 26, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update, March 26, 2013 

    Our focus right now is on post formats integration, both structured (formats with post meta) and “normal” output for the other formats.

    Priorities

    1. Work with Post Formats team to get the_video(), the_audio(), and the_image() functions into core, so we can avoid a ton of extra logic in Twenty Thirteen’s functions.php file to grab the first asset for a format. Making it easier for *any* theme to get the same data back and keep their template files simpler. Themes should not have to parse shortcodes or try to make something run through oEmded before display.
    2. Work with Post Formats team on post_formats_compat() functionality, improving Quote markup and filling in the gaps for other formats. Obenland is going to work on a patch for this.
    3. Image: we need clarification from 3.6 leads and Post Formats team on whether it is going to be structured or not (post meta) and it needs more work for the post-media functions (see 1 and 2 priorities above)
    4. Finalize each post format in Twenty Thirteen: what template HTML or PHP it needs, what it needs from core functionality to work correctly

    By post format

    Here’s a breakdown per format, per today’s discussion (IRC log).

    • Standard: good to go
    • Aside: we remove the title from the PHP template, added styling; non-structured
    • Chat: IHNIWIGOWTPF (see IRC log, hehe); non-structured
    • Gallery: we use a bit of PHP to remove default gallery styles, and we use a filter to change the image size to large on index view, then add a bit of CSS fanciness to change the first image to “bigger” size, 300×300 (single view is not changed other than to align the columns); non-structured
    • Link: structured, we use get_the_url() wrapped in our own fallback to output permalink if no URL is found
    • Image: right now it works OK without any changes, but the design calls for the image to be above the title, which means we need a way to pull out the first image, and have the_content() be output without that image; also filter content_width to 724 for this format (small issue with that reported in #23863). Seems like the best approach here is to use a custom image size to grab an exact 724 px wide image (unless it’s smaller that 724, in which case we grab the largest available). Ideal: a user uploads an image, adds it to the post content at exactly 724 from the Media editor, then the_image() outputs the exact HTML img tag + attributes.
    • Quote: structured; currently we rely on people using blockquote correctly in the editor, and style it with CSS; after Obenland’s patch to Quote markup (noted above in priority 2) we’ll add CSS support for the structured HTML markup, and leave in the basic styles in case someone uses post content anyway
    • Status: similar to Aside
    • Video: structured; we filter content_width to 724 to allow the video to be wider than the rest of the content area; needs the_video() to return the HTML output of first video and remove the same from the post content
    • Audio: structured, we’re leaning towards using the post format compat output instead of a custom structure in the theme; needs more testing but seems to be working OK as-is right now
     
  • Lance Willett 7:32 pm on March 19, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update, March 19, 2013 

    We’re in great shape to get to beta. Here is what we’re working on right now.

    Blocking older installs

    Tracked in #23819 — since Twenty Thirteen is 3.6+ only, older installs could see errors. We’d like to come up with a graceful way to not allow older versions of WordPress to install and run Twenty Thirteen.

    Maybe a nag function in the theme that puts up a warning? Forcing a change the previously activated theme upon activation? What are your thoughts?

    Relates to #13780 also.

    Post formats integration

    See #23619, #23620, and #23621 — we are waiting on the core functionality to be committed before we can change the theme code (images, videos, galleries, links).

    Recently completed

    • HTML5 improvements to comment list, comment form, and search form (yay!) #22005, #23702, and #23701
    • Solidify footer positioning when no JavaScript or no Masonry script available: #23771
    • More gallery visual fixes: #23773 and #23769

    Open issues

    Here is a link to open tickets.

     
    • Rami Yushuvaev 8:22 pm on March 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great work lance.

      But regarding to search forms, seems like you didn’t addressed the old discussions on tickets #14581, #19321, and #19579.

    • chp2009 10:49 pm on March 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think putting up a nag function that can only be seen by a user with admin permissions is a great idea. As a matter of fact only a user with admin permissions should be able to see errors related to the administration of the website. It creates a better user experience.

    • chacha102 5:04 am on March 23, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Plugins can deactivated themselves if they know their requirements aren’t met. There needs to be a precedent set for how theme’s who requirements haven’t been met can ‘deactivate’ themselves.

      I think that the result of a theme ‘deactivating’ itself should cause the same result as if the theme suddenly was removed. I believe right now it defaults to the default theme in WordPress. I would argue doing anything different then that creates an inconsistent error scheme.

      • Myatu 11:19 am on March 23, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If there was a way to track which theme it switched from (active before trying to activate this theme), then one could simply revert the action. That would be the safest method, as it does not alter the website in any way (ie., theme specific customizations, etc).

        • Myatu 11:25 am on March 23, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Having that said… Why not include this sanity check within the WP core itself, for both plugins and themes. Just give add two extra meta headers to the plugins/themes for the minimum WP and PHP versions, and add a little extra code that checks against these prior to activation. That would be a useful feature that could benefit many. #thinkingoutloud

        • Lance Willett 7:31 pm on March 23, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          See #13780 for the WordPress version requirement support.

  • Lance Willett 10:12 pm on March 12, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update, March 12 2013 

    This week we are closing as many open issues as possible to prepare for code freeze.

    Blockers

    Here are the current blockers to getting to a code freeze tomorrow, as scheduled:

    • Post formats: #23619 #23620 #23621 — waiting on the core functionality to be committed before we can change the theme code (images, videos, galleries, links)
    • #15080: Comment form HTML5 input types — just needs a commit
    • #20088: Improve wp_list_comments() markup — needs a code review from core team dev, then commit

    Recently finished

    Open issues

    Here is a link to all remaining open tickets.

     
    • RDall 10:22 pm on March 12, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Oh my… I don’t think I have ever seen the default gallery so uber cool as I have in Twenty Thirteen…

  • Lance Willett 11:57 pm on March 4, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update, March 4 2013 

    What we worked on last week

    Lots of fixes and improvements went in — thanks to everyone who reported and patched and tested.

    Bigger items discussed:

    1. Fixing the sidebar (including discussion of dropping it completely). We decided to just swap primary and secondary sidebars for now. See #23644.
    2. Remove fixed navbar for mobile — yes, let’s remove it. See #23647.
    3. Keep fixed navbar for desktop for now, but next step is to switch site title to menu there, try that out.

    IRC logs: Tue Feb 26 2013 | Thu Feb 28 2013

    What we’re doing this week

    More work on open tickets.

    Big items to tackle next:

    • Post format support: #23619 #23620 #23621
    • Sidebar / footer clearing, still no perfect CSS-only solution. JS techniques are next. See #23557.
    • Gallery styles: portrait sized images, #23649 — and caption styles, #23584.

    Non-theme tickets that affect Twenty Thirteen’s progress:

    • #15080: Comment Form Should use HTML5 input types for better accessibility
    • #15081: Search Form should use type=’search’
    • #20088: Improve wp_list_comments() comment markup

    Want to get involved?

    View open tickets.

    Join us in IRC during office hours and we can get you started on a ticket or task.

     
    • Monika 12:06 am on March 5, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      if a comment author is the post author his authorlink has “rel external and nofollow”,
      but his link is to the author page of the site, why rel external and why nofollow, no internal links should be nofollow,
      I ask this myself all the years ;)

    • RDall 5:05 am on March 5, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I will try to get to the IRC during office hours… I just downloaded Twenty Thirteen Yesterday to my dev build. I am not a fan of the fixed nav bar… I understand I could make a child them to alter this… But it just looks odd… Take for example a 17in monitor without widgets. http://cl.ly/image/3K303B150131 I know I am late to the game… I know this has been previously discussed… Not asking to rehash something again… but just to give my “2cents” even if abet a bit late…

    • Maor Chasen 7:44 pm on March 7, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Ha! The GIF on #23647 is a killer!

  • Andrew Nacin 7:18 pm on February 28, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: twentythirteen   

    It was pointed out that when using the WordPress Beta Tester plugin, Twenty Thirteen wasn’t being updated. As of r23529, that’s now fixed. If you update twice (once to get r23529, again to update the theme), you should be all set to test and contribute.

     
  • Lance Willett 6:58 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Twenty Thirteen project update 

    The Twenty Thirteen team jumped into 3.6 with two two first office hours this week; things are off to a great start. We’re meeting in #wordpress-dev IRC on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 17 UTC.

    Who we are

    (These are WP.org usernames.)

    • Leads: lancewillett and obenland
    • Contributors joining us for office hours this week: johnbillion kwight clakeb karmatosed sabreuse taupecat jorbin bpetty MikeHansenMe georgestephanis jayjdk nacin

    Many other folks already contributed patches and tickets, thank you.

    What we’re working on

    Tuesday we started by dividing things up a bit:

    • Color contrast and general accessibility (sabreuse and jorbin)
    • Mobile behavior, the navbar and menu need some work (obenland, johnbillion, and karmatosed)
    • Device testing (karmatosed)
    • General bug reporting and patches (everyone)

    We also looked at open tickets for Twenty Thirteen.

    Thursday we had a more open discussion style. Based on people grabbing tasks I’ve added a “point person” in bold after each — if you want to jump in look for “Unassigned” here and drop a comment or ping me in IRC.

    (More …)

     
  • Mark Jaquith 11:10 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , twentythirteen   

    Screen Shot 2013-02-18 at 5.15.50 PM

    A first draft of the Twenty Thirteen theme is now in core, for your inspection and iteration. See: r23452

    A demo site is available for you to browse.

    @matt set the goals for this theme: a focus on blogging, and great support for post formats (which are getting attention on the backend in 3.6 as well). Under Matt’s guidance, @joen explored the artistic possibilities and was joined by @obenland and @lancewillett in bringing it to fruition.

    What you’ll notice first is the colors. Way more use of color than a bundled WordPress theme has had before. Each post format has its own color, so each is distinct, yet they are all complimentary. The bold colors encourage authors to try out all the different formats. This color extends the full width of the window, which breaks your blog up into a lush, segmented timeline. This effect is even more pronounced on mobile browsers, where the screen can be dominated by one or two posts at a time, in all of their chromatic fullness.

    On closer inspection, you’ll notice details, like the font-based icons (“Genericons”, by @joen) that scale up to any resolution or zoom level and can be easily recolored using CSS.

    You may notice some playful details, like the size-offset pagination arrows:

    Screen Shot 2013-02-18 at 4.52.23 PM

    Or the 404 page (which I’ll leave to you to find).

    One of the goals of having a new theme every year was to give ourself room to experiment. That hasn’t really happened. We’ve been far too conservative, trying to make themes that work reasonably well for everyone, but don’t push boundaries too much. That changes with Twenty Thirteen. It’s hard not to have a strong feeling about the theme, one way or another. It defies you to give it a shrug or a kurt nod. Some of you will hate it. And that’s okay. We’ll still be shipping Twenty Twelve, which is an excellent base theme and a canvas on which you can build anything from a blog to a static content site. But with Twenty Thirteen we’re taking a bold stance: this theme was meant for blogging, and it’s not a blank canvas. It comes pre-marinated with playfulness and warmth and opinions.

    Twenty Thirteen really prefers a single column layout. Widgets live best in the footer, where jQuery Masonry bricks them together (but it supports a sidebar, if you really insist). Header images have a fixed width and height, and will be cropped at smaller resolutions, so the best choice is an artistic header where not 100% needs to be shown all the time (it ships with three).

    Now that we have a first draft of Twenty Thirteen in core, it’s time to start iterating and sanding off some of the rough edges. Accessibility is still important, even when making bold artistic statements, and I’d be surprised if we didn’t have work to do there. We’ll need testing on lots of different browsers and platforms, and with lots of different plugins. @helen‘s Post Format UI team will need to give feedback on upgrading Twenty Thirteen to use the new post format API functions that are available.

    @lancewillett and @obenland will be holding Twenty Thirteen office hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1700 UTC. Interested parties should make an effort to attend and help us get this beauty ready for beta!

     
    • Amy Hendrix (sabreuse) 11:18 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      First impression: WOW

    • Michael Beckwith 11:18 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Holy color!

    • Alison Foxall 11:24 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice Mark!

      First thing I notice is that although the search bar sticks to the top with the Twenty Thirteen branding while you scroll, the main navigation is not up there with it on both large desktop screens and small device screens. Was there a reason for this or can this be changed by the user? And of course I\’m wondering if the user will be able to change those colors for each post format. :)

      • Mark Jaquith 2:26 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        It’s a known issue, and something I’d like rectified. The dropdown menu that you get on small screens would be great up there. And colors could be overridden by a child theme — probably a lot of option overload if we exposed that.

    • Mel Choyce 11:30 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      WOW, instant love! The colors are bold but harmonious, the type is GREAT, and it’s got such a fabulous funky retro futurist feel. Thumbs up!

    • Emil Uzelac 11:34 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Pretty good for the first draft!

    • Xavier Borderie 11:46 pm on February 18, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wow indeed! I too was getting a feeling that the “clear white” theme spirit could feel overplayed if 2013 had it. I for one am very glad that the team is making such a bold move in a creative direction. I trust there will be enough theme option and color schemes so that users can make it their own in a few clicks.

      Great work!

    • aradams 12:10 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love the colors, love the flow. Nice to see creativity unleashed on the default theme!

    • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 12:13 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice! Just … Amazingly nice. I’m gonna have to find a site to use that on. Maybe my own!

    • Marcel van der Horst 12:14 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can’t wait to try it out..

    • BrentLeavitt 12:22 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I find that to be just delightful!

    • Aaron D. Campbell 12:23 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      So excited to have this in. It really is great!

    • Tony Scott 12:27 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      http://genericons.com/ seems to be behind a WP.com password.

    • Chuck Reynolds 12:32 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to the post format specific layouts and metadata.
      Would be nice if the video, once ‘fetched’, would autopopulate the title.

    • @mercime 12:50 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very Nice! Shades of BuddyPress :-)

    • trishasalas 1:01 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      …beautiful, you’ve managed to stick with the mimimal yet spice it up with jazzy colors. Instant LOVE <3

    • Austin Passy 1:03 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The theme demo looks great. Like the direction it heading in.

    • Jose Castaneda 1:09 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to testing the formats. Now to get home and uptade core.

    • Eduardo Zulian 1:36 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just finished testing Twenty Thirteen with the new post formats scheme. Sweet. : )

    • Lori Berkowitz 1:37 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks great! Also nice to see some post formats love :)

    • Edward Caissie 1:39 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Except for the header trick … sorry, it’s just not doing anything for me.

    • Anthony Hortin 2:00 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It’s lookin’ great so far! Well done to all involved!

    • Matt Mullenweg 2:12 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It’s counterintuitive because this is a visually much more aesthetically opinionated base than we’ve had probably since Kubrick, but I think we’ll see a lot more customization and variations on Twenty Thirteen than Eleven or Twelve. It’s a delightful canvas to play on.

    • Justin Sternberg 4:25 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice work all around! I couldn’t help myself: http://jtsternberg.com/

    • Sovit - (Theme Horse) 5:37 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This one will be the great example to show that without choosing white color can also make clean and beautiful theme. Love the way designer play the colors.
      Thanks to all contributors. Its really Fantastic ! Can’t wait to see it out in my themes directory.

    • Noel Tock 8:04 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love the new direction, looking versatile and fluid, +1

    • Ryan Hellyer 9:37 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      And here I was thinking that WordPress default themes need to be bland and white.

    • Petya Raykovska 9:50 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wow. Bold move, I love it.

      I’d make the main navigation sticky though, together with the search bar and the site name.

      And it would be great to have some color palettes to choose from as visually color is the first thing you experience with this theme.

    • emzo 10:06 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Default WordPress themes have always been great, but they’ve needed to be versatile and cater to the majority, and in doing so have had to be more conservative. This puts the fun back into WordPress, and definitely brings a smile to my face. I do agree that the collapsed mobile menu should be placed in the fixed header when scrolling though.

    • Luc De Brouwer 10:55 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This. Looks. Awesome.

    • lonchbox 12:14 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Excellent work! I love the post formats styles :)

    • sourceforge 12:59 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      there was a theme in tumblr directory by peter vidani, which used the colors for post types!

    • Monika 2:01 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      it looks like Windows8 :-) colorful and dizzying.

    • mindctrl 2:12 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Nice and different direction. With this new bold approach, I’d like to see the base font size increased a bit more. Chrome is telling me it’s 16px, and with Source Sans Pro 16px looks more like 14px. It looks good and is easier to read at 18 or even 20px.

    • Aaron Aiken 2:50 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Absolutely beautiful. Good work!

    • Arnan de Gans 3:15 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sponsored by Ubuntu I see…

    • Nashwan Doaqan 8:08 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It’s really a beautiful theme , but I don’t think It’s good to be a default theme ,It’s too colourful … Yes it’s different direction but many of WP users like the default themes because they are simple and have a less colours , I was thinking if you can make the colours system is optional in the theme control panel ….

      As I am seeing now , Its seems to be hard to use it as a framework , the default theme should be simple , clean , easy to customize and express WordPress main features !

      • Aaron D. Campbell 8:24 pm on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Twenty Twelve will still be packaged with WordPress too. I do however think this theme will actually be pretty easy to extend.

      • Emil Uzelac 12:40 am on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        This is actually going to be a perfect default Theme and honestly, very easy to customize as well.

        Colors are post formats and they can be changed or removed ;)

    • Daniel 10:15 pm on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is there a reason why the fixed navbar replaces the navigation menu with the site title? Doesn’t that pretty much defeat the purpose of the fixed navbar to provide better accessibility to the site’s navigation? Why would I need a static bar with just a link to the front page?

    • David Radovanovic 12:37 am on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      ooooooooo, ahhhhhh – very awesome indeed! The long scrolling homepage, ever-adaptive elements, and I’m sure much more will be realized with a test drive. Thanks!! BTW – why the persistent header with banner on all pages? Am I alone in wondering why is the banner needed on pages other the homepage?

    • Jean-Francois Arseneault 5:35 am on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Surprised to still see ‘Links’ in there as a post type…

    • shazdeh 9:03 pm on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Love at first sight. :)

    • Zulfikar Nore 10:47 pm on February 20, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Bold And Beautiful! A total change in direction from previous “Default” themes – this will make an awesome parent theme for developers to tinker with.

      Would like to chime in on the menu though….the sticky menu “bar” minus the menu is not doing it for me – I would like to see the menus as I scroll the page instead of a blank “bar”.

      Further more, since its bold in terms of color scheme – I would like to see the options to adjust the various sections incorporated in the Customizer’s Color section and not having to rely on changing them via child themes. As it is the child theme option would work for developer but not for the novice end user.

      But all in all, I’m totally loving what I see so far – now its time to go break it apart and see what I can conjure up :)

    • bjornsennbrink 9:48 am on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      What is up with the breaking of words in titles and in text? It was there in Twenty Twelve and is still around. Any insight on the word-breaking thingy would be great :)

    • alvarogois 2:58 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Strange unanimity… I’m a guy who likes color and bold, though I’m more for minimal. I don’t understand this theme and can’t picture it as a default WordPress theme. Maybe the focus here is on blogs, I get it, and giving the author a panoplia of customization options. I get it too. Nevertheless, I fail to realise how one goes from twentytwelve to this twentythirteen. Sure, it’s a cut, but I don’t see it as a step forward, something new, more like something else.

      (I could be wrong, though… me and Nashwan Doaqan up there…)

    • Marco Raaphorst 3:55 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      cool, love it!

    • rilwis 5:32 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Amazing theme. I like it and have a good feeling when I see it at first. It’s great when you can push the boundaries so far. It’s time to show people that WordPress is easy to customize.

    • Brad Dalton 9:16 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Its like it or not based on my readers feedback. Personally i love it but also know you guys could seriously blow the socks off any premium theme out there. Built in hooks and conditional tags is where its headed i think. WordPress theme users are smarter now and want more. They understand the basics of coding. Extend further.

    • tomjanski 9:44 pm on February 21, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The bold colors and bold theme. Bravo. It’s going to be a good one.

    • Shea Bunge 4:39 am on February 22, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Wow… really, really good. It”d be nice to get the default theme out early this year. (I;ve always thought that the annual themes should be released at the start of the year, not the end ;)

    • lisafirke 3:34 pm on February 22, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Gorgeous and playful. Bravo!

    • Tatiane Pires 3:06 pm on February 24, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great!
      I can’t wait to make a new theme for my blog based on Twentythirteen.

    • suzybyrnes 12:54 pm on February 27, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      love the full width. Agree with comments about fixed nav bar. Look forward to seeing what people do with it. Thanks v much.

    • bru.scopelliti 4:50 pm on February 27, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      What I have seen is very promising. Can’t wait the release

    • ecksteing 10:01 pm on February 28, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Twenty Thirteen is absolutely beautiful. Love the use of differing colours per Post Format.

    • Hassan 8:04 pm on March 2, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      My first impression was color-shock!

      It reminds me of the new refresh of Windows.com after the release of Windows 8. Oh, and those arrows for Newer and Older Posts, It’s hard not to see the “Metro effect” there ;)

      Also, I love the theme!

    • Misha 5:37 pm on March 3, 2013 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Oh, this theme is really nice on the whole! It’s interesting how it will look with a sidebar… I really need it.

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