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  • Andrew Nacin 6:31 pm on January 2, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5   

    Impromptu 3.5.1 meeting in 30 minutes (19:00 UTC) in #wordpress-dev. Still upwards of 16 tickets to lock down. Would like to hit 3.5.1 beta by the end of the week.

     
  • Andrew Nacin 4:40 am on December 19, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5,   

    For Wednesday, let’s plan on a 3.5.1 ticket triage meeting at 19:00 UTC (2 p.m. Eastern). Please be around if you can (#wordpress-dev of course), especially if you have something in progress for 3.5.1, so we can hammer things out and start thinking about timing.

    The dev chat is normally two hours later, at 2100 UTC. I won’t be available, and will leave that to @markjaquith and co. I expect it will be a light meeting again. 3.5.1 timing should be discussed, which should be easier with the triage session happening earlier.

     
    • Andrew Nacin 8:51 pm on December 19, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m currently feeling January 2 for a 3.5.1, which gives us a few weeks to fix everything in the pipeline. We could offer a hotfix now for #22985 and #22944, which both screw with data.

      Specific 3.5.1 tickets to discuss:

      • Whether to remove wp-app.php on upgrade: #22855
      • How to handle recoverable data loss for image editing: #22985 (fairly serious and needs a plan of action)
      • Windows-based servers are going to experience a bit of an issue. Need a plan of action. #22900. cc @dd32, @kurtpayne
      • No idea what is going on with #22899 (load-scripts.php issues). Is this the source of mod_pagespeed woes? Any more ideas (from @ipstenu and @dh-shredder, particular)?
      • Status on the three TinyMCE tickets, @azaozz? #22941, #22766, #22888
      • #22895, a create_posts issue, needs investigating.

      Additional notes on remaining tickets:

      • Any media UI-related tickets are getting reviewed by koopersmith (who is traveling today), so feel free to skip those. None are serious.
      • #22883, #22944, #22858, and #22882 are all API-level (post/user) issues that seem good to go. They need unit tests.
      • I need to pow-wow with @dd32 on Twenty Twelve upgrade issues. If anyone has any other thoughts: #22856
      • I will handle $wpdb->prepare() this week. That’s #22873.
      • Mike Schroder 9:02 pm on December 19, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I don’t suspect #22899 is the source of the mod_pagespeed issues, since encoding the brackets doesn’t solve the problem. We’re reaching out to the mod_pagespeed guys on this, and adding a temporary rule to avoid mod_pagespeed optimizing wp-admin’s JavaScript (which it arguably shouldn’t be doing anyway).

      • Robert Chapin (miqrogroove) 8:50 pm on December 21, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        #23041 needs review for 3.5.1 milestone.

    • Andrew Nacin 8:55 pm on December 19, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      And as alluded to in the previous comment, is there anything we can offer a hotfix for? This should be based on both severity and impact. Is forcing out a fix for load-scripts.php (that involves either encoding [] or chunking <script> tags) enough to fix most JS issues? If not, is there anything else we can do to avoid a lot of JS conflict/error issues people are having? Is there a common pattern in the support forums that suggest there is something we can target? etc.

    • tavaresv 3:40 pm on December 27, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Andrew, I saw your inputs on #22944 saying the “future posts” issue is resolved.

      As a blogger with that problem is there any way of knowing when it will be released to the public?

  • Andrew Nacin 7:01 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5,   

    Post-3.5 IRC meeting 

    Here’s the agenda for the December 12 developer chat in IRC. That’d be #wordpress-dev on freenode at 21:00 UTC. Should be a fairly low-key meeting:

    • Congratulations on WordPress 3.5, everyone.
    • Fallout of 3.5. How’s the support forums? Any common issues? What can we learn from plugins that broke?
    • Can we help with any common issues? Can documentation (like field guide posts) help?
    • Triage 3.5.1 tickets. What does our timeline currently look like?
    • Discuss plans for the month of December, and 3.6.
    • Stare at the download counter.

    Thank you so much for a great release. Really proud of what we accomplished. — @nacin, @koop

     
  • Andrew Nacin 6:14 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5, , sql,   

    PHP Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare() 

    Hello plugin or theme author! You possibly found this post after searching the Internet for the error above: “PHP Warning: Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare().”

    So, this is a new warning in 3.5. No sites are broken, everything is fine as before. But, this is indeed something you need to look at, because you may be exposing your users to a possible SQL injection vulnerability. Now that’s no fun!

    First, if you’re a user and you want to get rid of these errors, you should turn off the displaying of errors in PHP. There are many ways to do this, such as in php.ini, .htaccess, etc. For this, you can just put this in wp-config.php. (Note that hiding errors on production sites is good practice anyway.)

    <a href='http://profiles.wordpress.org/ini_set' class='mention'>@ini_set</a>('display_errors', 0);
    

    If you’re a user, you can stop here. (If you need more help, please don’t comment here, try the helpful Support Forums.) Just be sure to send a link to this post to the developer of the theme or plugin referenced in the error.

    Now, developers: Here’s how $wpdb->prepare() is supposed to work:

    $wpdb->prepare( "SELECT * FROM table WHERE ID = %d AND name = %s", $id, $name );
    

    See how $id — an integer, presumably — was passed as the second argument? That corresponds to the first placeholder, %d. Then, $name (a string) was passed as the third argument, thus the second placeholder, %s. This makes sure your query is safe, and prevents something like little bobby tables. (Note: the comic is wrong, don’t sanitize — always prepare your queries.)

    The problem is, a number of people were calling $wpdb->prepare() with only one argument, like so:

    $wpdb->prepare( "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM table" );
    

    See, there’s no parameter (%d, %s, or for floats, %f) in this query. This happens to work fine, but the prepare call isn’t doing anything. You should instead the query directly, as there are no inputs.

    But here’s where the problem lies:

    $wpdb->prepare( "SELECT * FROM table WHERE id = $id" );
    

    See the problem? That query isn’t secure! You may think you are “preparing” this query, but you’re not — you’re passing $id directly into the query, unprepared. And this, right here, is why $wpdb->prepare() now issues a warning if it isn’t called with more than one argument. Because you can’t prepare a query without more than one argument. Here’s a correct example:

    $wpdb->prepare( "SELECT * FROM table WHERE id = %d", $id );
    

    This wasn’t a decision done lightly. We don’t like shoving PHP warnings into the faces of users and developers. But given the potential security risks, we wanted everyone to immediately look at how they are running queries. And, of course, always prepare them properly.

    For more: wpdb Codex reference, #22262, and [22429].

     
    • Samuel Wood (Otto) 6:17 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Dangit. Stole my ottopress post for tomorrow. Now I have to come up with fresh, original content. ;)

    • Emil Uzelac 6:23 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good one, just submitted this http://wordpress.org/support/topic/warning-missing-argument-2-for-wpdbprepare-3 15 minutes ago. Let me link to this post as well, to help author out :)

      Thanks,
      Emil

    • chacha102 6:30 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Because you can’t prepare a query with more than one argument. Here’s a correct example:

      I think you mean, you can’t prepare a query without more than one argument.

    • Brian Layman 6:56 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Interesting.. So the rule of “Always use prepare on queries” is simply wrong.
      It should be “Always use prepare on queries that built with variable arguments.”

      I’d always thought it did further sanitization of the query string itself, but I suppose that would be really hard to do without blocking some valid query people would inevitably want.

      • Samuel Wood (Otto) 6:58 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The *vast* majority of problems with this I’ve seen today had variable arguments, but were putting them directly in the strings, like the third code example there. Which basically means that prepare did nothing to protect them.

        Previously, prepare(‘string’) returned ‘string’. Now it returns ‘string’ and a warning that you are doing-it-wrong. :)

      • chacha102 7:03 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If you check out the source code for wpdb::prepare it really isn’t that interesting.

    • Vitor Carvalho 11:17 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Fantastic explanation Nacin ;-)

    • Joost de Valk 2:14 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Had to chuckle a bit when I found this:

      Missing argument 2 for wpdb::prepare(), called in /home/example/public_html/wp-content/plugins/akismet/admin.php

    • rfair404 2:14 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks Nacin, I started seeing these notices in the last few weeks on several plugins that I use. glad to know what’s going on here.

    • a6april 3:18 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks Huge Andrew, I had no idea! I am always glad to learn something everyday! I appreciate the quick followup and all of the responses. Have a great day all!

    • Josh 4:31 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Extremely useful… and “juicy”! Thanks Andrew! Saved me tons of time. Nice to know you guys are on top of security. Thanks again!

    • nomadentech 11:29 am on December 13, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is works perfectly, i think similar error will found in another plugins, so we dont need to fear for updating WordPress core. :D
      Thank you,

      Teguh

    • properwp 6:01 pm on December 13, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thank you very much! We’re using a modified version of a clunky plugin in the repo and we keep finding new, wonderful problems. Another one of those “probably should have started from scratch” situations!

    • Mark de Scande BlogLines 8:04 pm on December 13, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The only thing here is that it should have been noted some were or it was and i did not see it or i did not read i had the same problem on my Wife site SuperBlogs.co.za but on BlogLines.co.za it all was perfect on SB i just added some dirty code to make it go away

      http://wordpress.org/support/topic/err-after-upgrade-to-35?replies=9

      But thx for posting it here for us all to see

    • Nashwan Doaqan 5:32 pm on December 14, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thank You Andrew Nacin , I see many plugins have this PHP warning .
      I hope a good life for all plugins authors :D

    • DigiproveDevelopment 12:51 pm on December 15, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Correction: some sites WERE broken because the warning messages screwed up the buffer and prevented normal operation.

      Am I the only one who thinks it was the wrong decision for WordPress team to decide that warnings will be spouted out for a situation where previously there was not even a Notice-level message? Like many authors I turn on notice-level messages when testing. And the underlying change caused so much difficulty because of a widespread but incorrect assumption that wpdb->prepare did actually do something with standalone sql strings when it fact what it did was – nothing.

      Suggest that:
      a) WordPress automatic upgrade process at least gives a warning to users who are using plugins not marked as being compatible with new release (e.g. like Firefox does).

      b) More use is made of notice-level messages fo situations like this so that sites don’t actually break when WordPress changes

      c) All registered plugin developers are warned by email of situations identified in beta testing which require action

  • Justin Sternberg 5:43 pm on December 11, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5, , admin columns, register_taxonomy,   

    WordPress 3.5 admin columns for custom taxonomies 

    WordPress 3.5 is here!! If you haven’t played with it yet, go get it!
    I’m proud to be listed as a contributor on this release and want to highlight a new feature geared towards developers that I helped work on. If you have checked the register_taxonomy() codex page recently, you may have noticed a new optional argument, ‘show_admin_column.’

    From the codex:

    show_admin_column
    (boolean) (optional) Whether to allow automatic creation of taxonomy columns on associated post-types.
    Default: false

    As stated, this new argument allows easy registration of taxonomy columns on post (and custom post type) list table screens much like the default tags’ and categories’ columns.

    'show_admin_column' in action

    This should make plugin and theme developers happy as they’ll no longer need to build these columns manually.

    The new argument in action:

    // hook into the init action and call create_activity_taxonomies when it fires
    add_action( 'init', 'create_activity_taxonomies' );
    
    // create taxonomy, "fitness-type" for the post type "activity"
    function create_activity_taxonomies() {
    	// Add new taxonomy, make it hierarchical (like categories)
    	$labels = array(
    		'name' => _x( 'Fitness Types', 'taxonomy general name' ),
    		'singular_name' => _x( 'Fitness Type', 'taxonomy singular name' ),
    		'search_items' => __( 'Search Fitness Types' ),
    		'all_items' => __( 'All Fitness Types' ),
    		'parent_item' => __( 'Parent Fitness Type' ),
    		'parent_item_colon' => __( 'Parent Fitness Type:' ),
    		'edit_item' => __( 'Edit Fitness Type' ),
    		'update_item' => __( 'Update Fitness Type' ),
    		'add_new_item' => __( 'Add New Fitness Type' ),
    		'new_item_name' => __( 'New Fitness Type Name' ),
    		'menu_name' => __( 'Fitness Type' ),
    	);
    
    	register_taxonomy( 'fitness-type', array( 'activity' ), array(
    		'hierarchical' => true,
    		'labels' => $labels,
    		'show_ui' => true,
    		'show_admin_column' => true,
    		'query_var' => true,
    		'rewrite' => array( 'slug' => 'fitness-type' ),
    	) );
    }
    

    Another key addition is the “manage_taxonomies_for_{$post_type}_columns” filter. This allows developers to add a taxonomy column to a post type outside of the register_taxonomy() function:

    Example:

    add_filter( 'manage_taxonomies_for_activity_columns', 'activity_type_columns' );
    function activity_type_columns( $taxonomies ) {
    	$taxonomies[] = 'activity-type';
    	return $taxonomies;
    }
    
     
    • Jon Brown 3:10 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Cool addition, I had no idea this was coming, thanks for highlighting it.

      • Justin Sternberg 3:38 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        It’s been a bit under the radar with all the amazing new features dropped in 3.5, but I’m glad to give it a bit of a push. :)

    • Frank Bültge 7:19 am on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very usefull; time to dont use the custom class for doing this. Thanks.

    • cdils 2:21 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yes! Thank you for highlighting this. Was just winging these columns this week with some Yoast code. Digging this!

    • Lisa Sabin-Wilson 3:22 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is really good stuff Justin! show_admin_column makes life a bit easier and cleaner.

    • cdils 4:07 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Was playing with this and thought I’d share…If you want to add more than one taxonomy column, add another line with syntax:

      $taxonomies[] = ‘second-taxonomy';

      Where {$post_type} is your CPT name

      /**Add columns to CPT admin page */
      add_filter( ‘manage_taxonomies_for_{$post_type}_columns’, ‘{$post_type}_type_columns’ );
      function {$post_type}_type_columns( $taxonomies ) {
      $taxonomies[] = ‘first-taxonomy';
      $taxonomies[] = ‘second-taxonomy';
      return $taxonomies;
      }

      Thanks again, Justin. Awesome stuff. Is there a filter for includling a custom field as a column?

      • Justin Sternberg 4:30 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        No there is not. Post meta can take on many forms, so to try to pin down a specific column use-case would undoubtably rule out a large portion of users. But honestly building custom columns for simple forms of post-meta is not too difficult.

    • mor10 4:30 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Excellent! The old way was so verbose and clunky. This looks much cleaner and more approachable.

    • Alex Mills (Viper007Bond) 8:39 pm on December 12, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This is great, thanks! Time to rip a bunch of manually added columns out of my plugins that use custom taxonomies!

    • RiccardoB. 9:09 pm on December 15, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Less code, same result. Useful!

    • Maor Chasen 9:38 am on December 20, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Lovely! Can’t wait to give it a spin!

  • Andrew Nacin 10:49 am on December 10, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5, , test me plz,   

    WordPress 3.5 RC6 is out. Please, if you can (and earlier the better), hammer on TinyMCE with the most ridiculous object and embed tags you can find, and anything HTML5. (Here’s a zip for the nightly build.)

    What’s important in RC6? After a good first attempt last week (#22790), we took another stab (#22842) at fixing TinyMCE’s handling of, well, ridiculous object and embed tags. Our goal right now is to ensure that nothing breaks in 3.5 that worked in 3.4.2. So, go find your best embed spaghetti* and make sure nothing breaks.**

    • Very easy to test: Go to the “Text “tab, paste something in, head to the Visual tab, confirm things don’t look broken, head back to the “Text” tab, see if it looks mangled, head back to Visual, confirm things don’t look broken. Remember, we are looking for regressions, so also check 3.4.2 to see if it occurs there.

    ** Breaks means the embed disappears in whole or part, or there’s a JavaScript error, or your computer starts smoking. Whitespace and other HTML changes do/will happen (contents may settle during shipping). Of course, your content should never be damaged, as that’s just no fun.

    What happened to the last two RCs? We generally try to do a “soft” or “silent” RC at the very end of a cycle. We’re confident we’ve gotten the testing it needs, but we’d like to enter a 24-hour period where there are no more changes to trunk. Having a cleaner version number provides for a good line in the sand, and can help in case some blocker bug report comes in. Of course this time, we’ve stuttered a few times. TinyMCE hell was RC4. A few final changes on Friday (after we decided to not release) resulted in RC5. And the second round of TinyMCE hell is RC6.

    This also means our new target is Tuesday, December 11. We’ll again convene at 10 a.m. Eastern to see if the winds are blowing in our direction. (Even NASA needs good weather.)

    And hey, on the bright side:

     
    • Nick 12:06 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just updated to WordPress 3.5 RC6 and conducted the above mentioned test… Nothing broken. Looks fine for me!

    • Xavier Borderie 12:40 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Insane work you’ve all accomplished again, guys! Congratulations and thank you!

    • Ryan Markel 1:16 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Casual thought: we need HTML-mangle unit tests so we aren’t caught off-guard by TinyMCE weirdness in future releases.

    • Jane Wells 2:35 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m thinking that @nacin and @koopersmith should submit a speaking proposal about this experience to the O’Reilly Fluent Conference. Proposals are due today, conference is May in San Francisco. http://fluentconf.com/fluent2013

    • mordauk 4:17 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Works perfectly for me so far.

    • Ipstenu (Mika Epstein) 4:39 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Banging on it without any errors so far. I’ve even gone to test my psycho code posts on halfelf. While it doesn’t work when I switch between posts that have a mondo amount of code (like I quote a whole MU plugin), it works better than it did on 3.4.2, so (1) not a regression (2) improvement!

      (The tl;dr of “If you have lots and lots of code in posts, tinyMCE is not your friend” remains, and that ain’t us, it’s them.)

    • paolal 5:15 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Tried to break it with many embeds, but it worked flawlessly. Thanks for all the work you are doing!

    • michaelha 5:27 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      @nacin thanks for the update

    • tjsix 6:26 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Trying out various combinations I found that if a nested tag inside a parent with attributes will be removed if it is empty, even if it has attributes of it’s own. I’ve tried this with just about every tag I could think of that would potentially be an empty element, i.e. divs, spans, i’s (for icon fonts), anchors all of which could conceivably be an element element and styled with a background image/font via css.

    • Eric Hoanshelt 8:00 pm on December 10, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking good so far!

    • memuller 1:08 am on December 11, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Tested with some crazy posts from members on my WP Network. There are issues, but I’m pretty sure there are no regressions.

  • Andrew Nacin 10:09 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5,   

    The new target for WordPress 3.5’s release is Monday, December 10, at 11 a.m. Eastern time.

    I badly wanted to release today, just as I did yesterday, and the day before. I want this thing kicked out to the curb as much as you want it running on your sites. But the entire core team is exhausted, and we’ve made too many changes this week on too little sleep to risk dropping 3.5 without an adequate code freeze and a few days of quiet. #22803 was downright frightening to see, while #22790 was just absurd on a number of levels. I wanted to go to bed at 11 p.m. last night and instead four of us worked until 7 a.m. The responsible voice in my head says without a doubt, that code needs to soak longer (and should probably sit in a corner with a dunce hat on).

    Plus, let’s face it, it’s late Friday afternoon on the east coast of the United States. I don’t want to do that to support teams, hosting companies, or translators. In the end, the extra few days can only help.

    So: we’re going to branch 3.5 now. I’m currently aiming for a code freeze that lasts 65 hours and fifty-five minutes in length. We will reconvene on Monday at 10 AM Eastern time (1500 UTC) and start working our way through the release checklist.

    Tomorrow evening, a few of us will touch base to see if anything has come up we need to deal with. By Sunday morning, we will know whether anything needs to change. Until then, we rest. I know, it’s lame we’re not shipping 3.5 yet. But a few more days will be forgotten sooner than potential egg on our face if we ship it without clear heads.

    In the meantime: Go update your WordPress.org profile with your full name so it can make it on the credits page. And enjoy the weekend!

    I’ll leave you with this:

     
    • Mike Schroder 10:12 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Heavy hearts is indeed the proper tag for this. Thanks for being willing to make the decision, but even more for your (and the rest of everyone who has been up for nights) sleepless effort.

    • Alex King 10:15 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      A wise (and I’m sure, hard and frustrating) choice.

    • Amy Hendrix (sabreuse) 10:15 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Mad props to you and the whole 7am crew — take care of both yourselvesa and the release.

    • Matthew Richmond 10:20 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sounds like a wise move. Props to you and all the contributors on the incredible work so far!

    • Alex Mills (Viper007Bond) 10:20 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      But a few more days will be forgotten sooner than potential egg on our face if we ship it without clear heads.

      Hear hear. Users aren’t going to care if 3.5 is a few days late compared to serious bugs.

    • Matt Wiebe 10:20 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      /me salutes the lead developers and wishes them dreams of, well, just dreams. Because sleep.

    • Shane Pearlman 10:21 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Dude, thank you for applying common sense. No one will actually remember if it is really today or monday in the scheme of things, but they will always remember when bad things happen.

    • Jeremy Felt 10:22 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Fantastic job getting it here. Smart call to wait. Thanks to all the 7am-ers!

    • quicoto 10:25 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good choice, thanks for all the hard work guys!

    • Luis Rull 10:27 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good choice. We need good code, not early one. Keep up with the good work.

    • Syed Balkhi 10:30 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Can’t wait for it :) Keep up the good work.

    • Joey Kudish 10:32 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great rational and responsible choice. Kudos and mad props for all the long nights!

    • BobDunn-Trainer 10:34 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Makes total sense… and all I can say is thank you and everyone else for all this hard work!

    • Birgit Olzem 10:37 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thank you, for your announcement, Andrew. I know, it was a critial decision for you, but really reasonable! Have a good rest at weekend.

    • jcastaneda 10:39 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Completely reasonable. It would be like serving uncooked food.

    • Michael Beckwith 10:40 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Go enjoy the weekend everyone, business can resume Monday.

    • joelwills 10:49 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thanks for all your hard wok everyone, much appreciated!

    • Jerry Bates (JerrySarcastic) 10:55 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Spock would say that this is “…the only logical conclusion.”

    • Richard Tape 11:18 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “I know, it’s lame we’re not shipping 3.5 yet.”

      No. Just no.

      It’s not lame. It’s the right choice. It’s the only choice. Thank you, Andrew and everyone else for the ridiculous hours of work you’ve put in to this and all releases. Enjoy your weekend. You’ve deserved it.

    • cjc1867 11:34 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      no pressure but make it perfect as can be but release it when you are ready guys

    • Tony Scott 11:36 pm on December 7, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Better late and right, rather than ontime and wrong (not my phrase, can’t remember from whom)!

    • Philip Arthur Moore 12:12 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Echoing the sentiments of everyone who has commented before me. Watching #wordpress-dev the last several days has made me realize the sheer amount of work that you guys are putting into getting this out the door. It’s impressive, to say the least.

      When it’s all said and done no one will remember a few missed days or deadlines. What they will remember is how much of yourself you’ve given to this release and everyone will applaud you for it and be thankful.

      Get some sleep.

    • Jason Spatola 12:18 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looks like I’m the lone voice of dissent here. Horrible decision, guys. (Just kidding. Can’t wait until Monday!)

    • marcopako 12:37 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Thank you guys!

    • Jon Brown 1:14 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’ve been keeping track of irc and trac… and my god you guys have been gone HARD for a LONG time. Take a few minutes this weekend to breathe and enjoy… you deserve that and WAY more. Thanks for all the hard work.

    • FAT Media 1:33 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This was definitely the right call. Anyone who is upset by this decision needs to have their heads examined. Keep up the great work guys and get some freakin sleep!

    • jasontucker 2:40 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just remember, beer fixes most things! :) HAve a drink and a relaxing weekend all.

    • Samuel Wood (Otto) 3:03 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Too much niceness here.

      THIS IS BAD AND YOU SHOULD FEEL BAD.

      Also, have a good weekend, and if you happen to mention where you’re going, I may call in a shot for you. Be careful out there folks! :)

    • Ryan McCue 3:28 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Heard they punched a duck?

      Poor @duck_, he never stood a chance.

    • Dan 3:32 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      A wise decision. High-five to all the core devs, thanks for all your hard work.

    • George Stephanis 3:49 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I fully support this decision. Unless Keri is reading, in which case OH GOD DON’T BLAME ME, BLAME JORBIN, IT’S ALL HIS FAULT.

      And RE: duck punching, no mallards were harmed in the making of WordPress 3.5

    • Konstantin Kovshenin 8:28 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good move! Besides, whoever really needs 3.5 are running RC4 anyway.

    • Frank Bültge 10:47 am on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Good decision! The people need to test early and the RC is available, who wants to use 3.5.

    • Jonas Bolinder (jond3r) 1:49 pm on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Anybody else pondering about duck punching and monkey patching? Here’s what Wikipedia has to say.

    • cdils 3:36 pm on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I am beyond impressed with you guys and the efforts you’re taking to release solid code to the community. Take a big nap and thanks for your hard work.

    • Maor Chasen 7:45 pm on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great call. Better be a stable version rather than a buggy one.

    • markroth 8:43 pm on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This was a very good call. I commend you for that. And I thank you immensely for all the work you’ve done and are doing on WordPress!

    • Abhishek Ghosh 8:47 pm on December 8, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great move.

      `I know, it’s lame we’re not shipping 3.5 yet. But a few more days will be forgotten sooner than potential egg on our face if we ship it without clear heads.’

      It is carefulness to make the perfect.

  • Andrew Nacin 4:29 pm on December 4, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5   

    All hands on deck! Within the next few hours, we need to get http://core.trac.wordpress.org/report/6 to basically zero tickets.

    Some of these patches will have a bit of a learning curve, but you can help with testing! And are there a lot of things to test — a near constant stream of patches. We will be in #wordpress-dev for the rest of the day.

    We are hoping to do a soft RC4 early evening (so, five or six hours), which still means we can release tomorrow if the stars align. Cross your fingers. Actually, if you can help while crossing your fingers, you can improve the success rate of your own finger-crossing! Woo.

     
    • pavelevap 7:42 pm on December 4, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Why is so important to hurry and release 3.5 on Wednesday? Trunk is really live, there were many changes which should be tested. One more week would be helpfull, I guess…

      • Andrew Nacin 8:09 pm on December 4, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Deadlines are not arbitrary.

        Software will always have bugs. There will always be one more thing. At some point, you need to ship. If we waited until there were no bugs reported for X number of hours/days, we would never release anything. We have maintenance releases for good reason.

        A decision to release is not arbitrary either, and will only be made if we are confident with the stability and current state of trunk. That is not an easy decision to come to, but it eventually needs to happen. “Confidence,” of course, is inherently subjective. But, this is my sixth major release on the core team, and a number of individuals have been around far longer. If the feeling is right and consensus is there, we will launch.

        The only stuff we are currently shoring up is media, which is getting stress tested on WordPress.com. Even the changes we make today are getting live-deployed as we go. A team of people are looking through both WP.com support tickets and support forums, not to mention others looking at the WordPress.org support forums. Nothing major is coming up. We’re only dealing with edge cases.

        As I said, it’s a feeling. We can get a very good sense of where we are at based on the volume, type, consistency, and repetition of bug reports. Right now, we are only dealing with well-defined edge cases.

        We can also quantify this in any number of ways. For example, at this point in the release cycle compared to the same point in 3.4, there are twice the number of installs with the WordPress Beta Tester plugin active and set to “bleeding edge”. There have also been more raw downloads of beta and RC candidates of 3.5 than 3.4, over about the same amount of time (two months and a week or two). Notwithstanding that 3.4 had four betas and 3 RCs (plus a quiet RC4), while we’ve had only 2 betas and 3 RCs.

        And so, Wednesday remains our target. Might we slip a day or more? Yes, as of right now it is still possible. A lot of things need to happen — and a lot of other things need to not happen — for us to hit tomorrow. But I would rather it be because of something out of my control — like a suddenly discovered critical bug. So I’m going to do everything in my power to see that we can.

        • Andrew Nacin 8:27 pm on December 4, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          We will decide in IRC tomorrow whether we are good to go to release WordPress 3.5. Worth noting we actually recorded this last time:

        • Andrew Nacin 8:31 pm on December 4, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          One more note — we do have a fairly strong rule that trunk should sit untouched for a day before release. So, we’ll be stopping commits in a few hours, and won’t have any activity tonight or in the morning in order to make a judgment tomorrow.

        • Peter Westwood 8:24 am on December 5, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Well said!

    • Robert Chapin (miqrogroove) 12:30 pm on December 6, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Basically zero tickets. Congrats!

      • Cyndi 5:32 pm on December 13, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Where do we report bugs found? I found one re privacy settings disappeared after having it set not to allow and taking site live can’t change it and I deactivated all plugins. I don’t see privacy anywhere unless I click on Yoast’s plugin to take me there.

  • Andrew Nacin 11:11 pm on November 21, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5   

    The short road to 3.5 

    Good dev chat today. The plan is for RC1 tonight (more on that in a moment). Here’s the current assignments for who is working on what, based on the main 3.5 report. Feel free to help with testing and patching across the board.

    • A number of IE7/8/9 issues with media, of varying severity. A number of people are working on this, and more are welcome. The focus is currently IE9 and IE8. Until those are fully working, IE7 should be untouched, as we may just severely degrade the media UI in IE7. #22446
    • Mark Jaquith is working on the SimplePie/DOMDocument/kses ticket. #21990
    • Dion was to work on the get_home_path() ticket, which is now fixed. #20449
    • The general IE audit for 3.5 was done with one more commit. #22467
    • The about page and feature pointers need an initial commit. #22455, #22454
    • The help text changes need a final review and commit. #22451
    • The WP_Image_Editor architecture ticket is still an ongoing conversation between scribu, Marko, and Mike Schroeder. #22356
    • Dominik (ocean90) has a patch ready to close out the attachment post type UI ticket. #21391
    • Koop is working on the media upload tickets. #22243, #22480

    Ongoing things:

    • The Tumblr Importer needs beta testers! It now uses their OAuth API, which requires you to create a (simple) app. Link to the beta version. #22422
    • Want to test WordPress 3.5? Consider testing the more interesting scenarios: mobile devices, desktop browsers (IE!), right-to-left languages.

    Lower priority tickets:

    • westi is working on the _wp_translate_postdata() ticket. #22417
    • The media tickets here will be worked on over the next few days. #22524, #22282, #22494, #22532, #22512, #22517
    • The child theme installation bug is now fixed in trunk. There is a patch with some additional error handling. #22515

    Decisions reached:

    • Twenty Ten will not be shipped with fresh downloads of WordPress 3.5. It will still be supported (and still reside in core SVN) and will continue to receive updates through the themes directory. #22500

    Schedule from here on out:

    • Release Candidate 1 today, once we have no more tickets of major severity open.
    • Eat turkey tomorrow. I won’t be opening my computer tomorrow. If you’re with family, you shouldn’t either.
    • Release Candidate 2 on Monday. At this point, report/6 should ideally be empty (no tickets). WordPress.com is also planning to merge 3.5 on Monday, which should significantly increase our test coverage (and bug reports) for media come next week.
    • Release Candidate 3 (assuming there are major bugs fixed after 2) no later than Monday, December 3.
    • Which sets us up for a December 5 release, assuming we don’t reach a critical mass of critical issues next week.

    [IRC logs]

     
    • pavelevap 12:21 pm on November 22, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hmm, what about string freeze? I saw some HUGE i18n commits last night and also About page is not ready. If I remember correctly, there should be at least 3 weeeks available for translators?

      • Andrew Nacin 1:38 pm on November 22, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I tried to go easy on the i18n commits. About page is nearly ready. Strings will be formally frozen in the next 24-36 hours. You’ll have 12 days of freeze including two weekends (which is about our standard time for string freeze).

  • Andrew Nacin 5:22 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: 3.5   

    Countdown to 3.5 Beta 1 

    As I covered at the end of the dev chat yesterday (logs), we’re planning for 3.5 Beta 1 next week. This gives us a week to land a lot of things.

    I’ve updated the teams and tasks page. Everything is moving along nicely! Solid pace everywhere. There’s also a UI-specific progress report from @lessbloat on make/ui.

    Ship early, ship often. This is expected to be a very rough cut beta. I called it “scrappy,” and not in the pugnacious way. After that, the plan is for a new beta every week. By beta 3 or so, major features should be pretty well shored up.

    Some background on this: As I mentioned during the chat, I really want to make sure we have strong pre-release participation. After studying the last five release cycles, I noticed that earlier and less stable betas can encourage this. When we ship more polished betas, it seems people pick up on that, and it feels like less testing occurs. Additionally, we’ve sometimes gone a month or more between the first and second beta. Rather than slowing down, beta should be the time we speed up!

    So, by week 6 or so, we should be ready to transition out of bug-fix mode and into RC mode. I’m excited! Who’s with me?

     
    • DaveofDC 5:34 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m sorry — I know I left two posts last weekend and now I can’t find it. Both are same issue. This is in regard of post-by-email — on-going problems. Now my posts seems to disappeared or I’m looking for them in wrong place — I’m positive it was in this page. Anyway, do you have status or view on my problems? Of course, if only know where my posts are.

      Thanks.
      Dave

      • Andrew Nacin 5:48 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Dave, you posted here: #19960. I have a follow-up question there. (You also posted a comment here, which I’ve deleted now that we’ve chatted here and I’ve pointed you back to #19960.)

        • DaveofDC 12:22 am on September 26, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I didn’t get any notification email you replied. Will do. I”m traveling now. When I have a few hours, I’ll run one or two tests to make copy of the source codes.

    • Japh 5:38 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m excited! Hoping to have ImageMagick done for Beta 1 as well if possible.

    • Rev. Voodoo 5:45 pm on September 20, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m ready to dive in! – I just hope I have some free time to actually do some testing!

    • Pippin Williamson 1:46 am on September 21, 2012 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Very excited for the first beta!

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