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  • Jen Mylo 2:30 pm on June 1, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2, ,   

    3.2 Schedule Update 

    We were scheduled to do RC1 today. With around 100 tickets in Trac, this is not happening. We did a giant push to meet the beta deadline, but then people went back to their other stuff, dealt with 3.1.3 security release along with beta 2, and generally slowed down. I’m pushing back the RC target date on the schedule to Monday.

    In the words of Lester Bangs (by way of Cameron Crowe via Almost Famous), let’s be honest and unmerciful in today’s scrub.

    • If there’s a patch, make the call: is it in or out? If it’s not a blocker or a regression and the patch isn’t quite there, punt it, even if it is your pet ticket.
    • If there’s not a patch, how bad is the bug? Blocker or regression? Assign it to someone and get a patch for testing by tomorrow. Not? Punt it and hit it early in 3.3.
    • We need to fish or cut bait on a number of lingering small UI things. If someone wants to run through them with me we should be able to knock them out today or by tomorrow at latest.
    • Licensing tickets. We need to do the right thing in all cases, and we need to do it this release.
    • String freeze. I’ll do a run through today/tomorrow and look for anything that we’d planned to update but haven’t yet, including Credits and Freedoms screens. We need to do a check on text in help tabs,too, some still need updating. Will write text change patches myself or have a volunteer do them.
    • Any tickets left in the milestone by EOD tomorrow should be blockers.

    Let’s get this released tidied up and shipped so we can get started on 3.3!

     
  • Jen Mylo 10:32 am on May 12, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2,   

    A couple of hours ago, the first 3.2 beta release hit the ground. You know the drill: you break it, you buy it. Oh, wait. I meant, you break it, report it, and we all work together to fix it. Would be great to get more people helping with bug fixes between now and RC. Tell your friends.

     
  • Jen Mylo 6:13 pm on May 5, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2, , meeting summary   

    Dev Chat Summary – May 4, 2011 

    We have passed feature freeze, and are now in UI week, leading up to a beta date of May 11. This week’s dev chat checked in on all the things we originally targeted for 3.2.

    • Drop PHP4 compat: This is done, but there are 1 or 2 places we went a little too far and need to revert to not break things.
    • Distraction-free Writing (dfw): Backend is ready. Need to change the buttons used for HTML actions, provide support for escape key, support theme styles, and fine-tune transition times. @azaozz owns this one.
    • List tables API improvements: Not happening for 3.2. Westi’s basic summary of findings: More actions/filters/standardization and don’t support subclassing as an override method. Will try to get to this in 3.3.
    • Twenty Eleven (new default theme): Mostly finished, needs editor style support added.
    • IE6 EOL: Most agreed with @aarondcampbell‘s suggestion for the nag — IE < 8 could say "you're insecure" and anything < most recent could say "your browser is outdated" @aarondcampbell will write patch, with confer with nacin about recent api work.
    • Speed improvements: There are lots and lots of speed improvements under the hood. Ryan has done time testing to prove it. If we have release video, Mark J suggested doing side by side view to show the difference. Nacin looked into PHP lazy loading, said it would not bring much improvement, so skipping it.
    • Partial core upgrades: work begun by @dd32, being finished by @nacin. Says nothing needs to be done in core, just on .org side re generating appropriate zips.
    • Style update: @dkoopersmith got first patch into trunk yesterday, had a large chunk of the update in it. Getting the rest in now, and then we’ll do a sweep to see what needs fixing/adding. Asking people to hold off on design feedback/requests/details until we’re ready, to avoid lots of trac messages about details that are already being added, just haven’t been committed yet. Should be there in a day.
    • Trac tickets: feature requests and enhancements mostly getting punted since past feature freeze. If there’s a bug you really wanted fixed, then get in there and find more people to test the patches on the ticket. Tickets withut patches will be punted.
    • Remainder of UI week will be dedicated to finishing the style update, and hitting small UI tickets that weren’t urgent/important enough to take attention away from core functionality, but that just make things a little bit nicer (it’s embarrassing that there are still things we put in during 2.7 that we said we’d clean up in 2.8 and then never got around to).
     
    • Aaron D. Campbell 6:22 pm on May 5, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I opened a ticket for the out of date browser nag (#17323). There’s a patch there, but you can’t test it since the API it’s supposed to work with doesn’t exist yet.

    • arena 11:34 pm on May 5, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      date_i18n bug #17278 patch is ok for me

      would like to have a feedback on #17334

      keep up the good work

    • KranzKrone 2:43 pm on May 6, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sounds good, so far.

      I still hope that you make WordPress more faster, and Update the P2 Theme. Maybe give them a bit more features or maybe some Child Themes? ;)

      • Jane Wells 3:16 pm on May 6, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        As noted in the summary, WordPress has been made significantly faster. P2 is not developed by the WordPress open source project, it is developed by Automattic. If you want to request features you should contact them or leave a post in the themes forum. As for child themes, anyone can make one; if there are features you’d like to see in P2, why not just make a child theme of it yourself that does what you need?

  • Jen Mylo 7:20 pm on May 4, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2,   

    For all you SVN-uppers, don’t freak out: we’re trying out the style refresh that’s been being talked about over on the UI blog, and things might look a little ugly as we get it all worked out.

     
  • Andrew Ozz 10:35 pm on April 25, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2   

    The Distraction Free Writing mode has been in trunk since yesterday. Would appreciate comments, suggestions, opinions, etc. Bug reports should probably go on #17136.

     
  • Jen Mylo 1:44 am on April 21, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2   

    There are 56 tickets in the 3.2 milestone marked has-patch, needs-testing. 18 with needs-patch. It would be great if everyone capable of doing so would help test these and report on them this week, since freeze is coming up on the 30th, and at that point anything not in will be punted. The leads are all working on specific things, so these tickets are in need of loving attention. Namely, yours. :)

    Help, as always, is greatly appreciated.

     
    • Rami 11:51 am on April 27, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      What about tickets that has-patch and were tested but not on 3.2 milestone (like #16999 and #16834 )?

      • Jane Wells 11:59 am on April 27, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If they have been tested by multiple people (neither of those tickets have been) and would be unlikely to cause to any compatibility issues with plugins/themes, they could be reviewed for inclusion. One person saying it’s tested isn’t enough, though (#16999), and Yoav said #16834 is not good to go.

        • Rami 12:22 pm on April 27, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          ok, thanks for the quick response i will send a mail to yoat to test the patch (#16999).

          by the way, the “editable_slug” filter has no compatibility issues, it’s a common sollution to deal with non-english slug charecters (see: #6915, #10966).

  • Ryan Boren 8:47 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2   

    Bug gardeners, there is now a 3.2 milestone in core.trac. Tickets assigned to this milestone should relate to the 3.2 plan. There are currently 312 tickets marked as 3.2 early. Only a fraction of these should end up on the 3.2 milestone.

     
  • Mark Jaquith 5:40 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: 3.2   

    WordPress 3.2, the plan: faster, lighter 

    Timelines and assignments will be decided next week, but in the meantime, here’s what WordPress 3.2 is looking like:

    • Faster release cycle than 3.1 — more focused release. I’ll be taking point on this release, making sure people stay on target and making sure we don’t try to slip “one more thing” in. Don’t make me get mean. :-)
    • The theme is “faster, lighter.” We’re dropping support for outdated technologies. We’re looking at making things faster, and we’re looking at making the writing experience more lightweight and calming.
    • List Tables API improvements (Westi and Koop) — finalize the API for third party use and more flexibility.
    • List Table XHR loading — to be investigated only after List Table API has stabilized. Make sure it’s worth it before we burn time on it.
    • PHP 5.2 (5.2.4, specifically) to be required. Drop compat. But don’t go adding a bunch of PHP5 stuff. This release is about dropping the old, not adding the new. More red than green.
    • MySQL 5 to be required. This quite literally involves no work beyond changing the requirements. Do not change queries.
    • IE6 EOL for the admin. If BrowseHappy is updated in time, we can consider adding a “use a real browser” nag for IE6 users. We probably can’t drop much CSS, as IE7 shares a lot of the issues. This is mostly symbolic, and reduces the platform combos we need to test. This also means any security issues that are shown to only affect IE6 only can be lowered in priority.
    • Distraction Free Writing. This is our headline “ooh, shiny” user feature. Replace our current fullscreen implementation with something more beautiful, more useful (in terms of line-length and font size), and simpler (only limited RTE functionality). Look at WriteRoom, OmmWriter, http://www.quietwrite.com/ for inspiration. Koop is investigating this, and may crank out a quick plugin to jump-start development efforts
    • Upgrade improvements. Changed-files-only upgrades can be done with zero changes to core. For the first effort, let’s just do updates to the latest point-point from within the same major version. So, 3.2 to 3.2.2 and 3.2.1 to 3.2.2. Optionally consider scanning for changed core files and offering them a full upgrade to overwrite those changed files. Skip the wp-contents directory when upgrading (no more upgrading the default theme or bundled plugins).
    • Speed improvements. There are a bunch of little things we can do to make WordPress load or at least “feel” faster. Nacin is looking at PHP lazy loading. He also is working on a patch to make the admin menu load faster by doing the expansion in PHP. We can make the dashboard faster by not doing async requests for panes if the cache is hot. Dion has some FTP improvements that should make upgrades a lot faster for people using a certain FTP server. Everyone can get involved here. Pick sometime small and manageable that will make WordPress a little faster. Together, they’ll add up to a bullet point in the release post.
     
    • Mo Jangda 5:42 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      > Distraction Free Writing

      http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/zen/

      • Mark Jaquith 5:44 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Yep, we were looking at that too, for some inspiration.

      • vachi 4:35 am on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        its pretty cool, but i think they are giving too many options, something like informationarchitects.jp’s writer for the iPad, seems like a more metaphorically appropriate, smashing called it “effective”
        its comes down to being strict and deciding what is truly important for writing

        • Mark Jaquith 4:40 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Agreed. And what limited UI there is should be out of mind (even fade away as you type).

        • Babs 6:54 am on March 26, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Having downloaded and had a play with Zen – yes it is lovely but can be a distraction in itself, I feel. Agree with vachi that there are too many options. #justsaying

      • jkudish 3:55 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I think this is pretty neat, but should remain as a plugin, why bulkify the admin, when the whole premise of WordPress is it’s expandability via plugins?
        There’s also already a full-screen mode which comes pretty close to this.

      • Aziz Poonawalla 12:53 pm on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Will Quickpress be a focus in 3.2? On the P2 dev forums there was discussion of adopting and extenduing quickpress for use with P2 and any other theme that wanted to use it.

        • Mark Jaquith 3:57 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          We’ve not discussed that. I’d rather be conservative in 3.2 and get us back on track with on-time, focused releases.

    • Vivek Parmar 6:03 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Waiting for it. WordPress changed my life

    • Babs 6:05 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      You are spoiling us! Exciting stuff on its way – thank you all – we are not worthy. Now to go check that everyone has the required levels of PHP and MySQL.

    • Jess Planck 6:18 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Yay! Hopefully this help me put a final nail in the coffin for the one PHP4 server I am co-managing.

      • Joseph Scott 7:24 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        You don’t need to wait for WordPress 3.2 to upgrade to PHP5. Releases of WordPress have worked just fine on PHP5 for quite some time.

        • Jess Planck 7:34 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I’m glad you made that comment, it could help others, but you miss understood. It’s not entirely my server, but an emergency server in a remote datacenter that we should have moved to more economical cloud hosting years ago.

    • demetris 6:28 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is there a reason we don’t go a bit higher than 5.2.4 for PHP? The versions shipping in the most used server distros do allow us to go a bit higher:

      CentOS 5.5: PHP 5.1.6, MySQL 5.0.77
      Debian Etch: PHP 5.2.0, MySQL 5.0.32
      Debian Lenny: PHP 5.2.6, MySQL 5.0.51a
      Debian Squeeze: PHP 5.3.3, MySQL 5.1.49
      Red Hat 4.8: PHP 4.3.9, MySQL 4.1.22
      Red Hat 5.6: PHP 5.1.6, MySQL 5.0.77
      Red Hat 6.0: PHP 5.3.2, MySQL 5.1.47
      Ubuntu 10.04 LTS: PHP 5.3.2, MySQL 5.1.41

      • Mark Jaquith 6:43 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        We settled for 5.2.4 based on usage. That’s where the huge PHP 5.x “break” happens. 5.3 is a no-go. It’s also what Drupal and Joomla require.

        • demetris 8:42 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Based on usage makes sense. Thanks for the answer.

        • GaryJ 11:51 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Is there not a potential security issue, in that php.net do not support the 5.2 series any more?

          Is it forseeable that while WP 3.2 can move to PHP 5.2.4, WP 3.3 / 3.4 can be moved to PHP 5.3+ ?

        • GaryJ 8:40 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Where is that 6% figure from? Some call-home feature from WP installs on update checks?

          If the problem is in fact the hosts themselves using unsupported version of PHP, do Matt’s / Automattic’s recent connections made through JetPack integration not have any influence in persuading the big hosts to bump their distributions up?

        • Rob 9:45 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          “the hosts themselves using unsupported version of PHP”

          That word “unsupported”. It does not mean what you think it means.

          Developers might follow the ivory tower pronouncements from php.net, but ops (for the most part) really only care about what their distribution vendor is doing. And it’s ops who by definition decide what is and isn’t supported.

          For example, Ubuntu 6.06 LTS is still supported by the vendor and contains both PHP 4.4.2 and PHP 5.1.2.

          RHEL 4 is still supported by the vendor (and will be for another year) and contains PHP 4.3.9 (and no PHP 5 at all).

        • Keith Casey 1:42 pm on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          @Rob – What does “supported” mean in this case? Have Canonical or Redhat backported PHP 5.x patches? Have they rolled their own release? Have they picked up core PHP development?

          One of the first rule of Ops is to update your software. PHP 4.x has been formally dead for nearly 3 years. If someone is still running it.. oh well. Odds are they’re still using WordPress 1.x and Windows 95 with IE6.

        • Rob 2:57 pm on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          “Have Canonical or Redhat backported PHP 5.x patches?”

          Where security- or stability-related, yes. This is what distributions do.

          “Have they rolled their own release?”

          Yes. This is what distributions do. Feel free to open up a .src.rpm and have a look. The CentOS mirror at http://mirror.centos.org/centos/4/updates/SRPMS/ would be a good start.

          “Have they picked up core PHP development?”

          No. This is not what distributions do.

          “One of the first rule of Ops is to update your software.”

          But not to keep blindly updating to the latest-and-greatest-and-possibly-broken-or-incompatible version. (Particularly for PHP which has a terrible track record of changing a few APIs for no apparent reason with every single patch release.)

          “PHP 4.x has been formally dead for nearly 3 years.”

          Ivory tower pronouncements from php.net are ivory tower pronouncements.

        • Andrew Nacin 5:14 pm on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          If there’s anyone to call out php.net for ivory tower pronouncements, it’d be Keith. Make a point about PHP 5.3, sure — but not PHP 4, that’s pretty ridiculous. You’re barking up the wrong tree, I think. :-)

        • GaryJ 8:41 pm on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          re RHEL4 / Ubuntu 6.06 – just because a product is supported, doesn’t mean they should continue to use it if newer (including LTS in the case of Ubuntu) versions are available, which, I assume, include newer versions of PHP.

          Clearly it’s a business decision for hosts – organising their clients such that those who want / need to stay on older versions can do, while taking on the cost of updating distributions on servers (or even possibly just PHP itself) and supporting their clients through the transition.

          Without incentives to update, it’s a catch-22 – popular projects won’t update without the usage existing, and hosts won’t feel the need to update for a competitive advantage in being able to host the popular projects that require 5.3, despite it being released 21 months ago.

          My query, was that if WP is powering ~10% of the world’s websites, the WP community (perhaps with the communities from Drupal, Joomla, and non-CMS projects like Zend Framework 2 and Doctrine 2 which already require PHP 5.3) to push the big hosts to make the jump to PHP 5.3, then all the communities would be able to make use of the technologies sooner, than if we sat back and were forced to support whatever legacy versions hosts and distrubution makers decided.

          If 6% is accurate, I agree that requiring 5.3 is ridiculous, but I’d like to see the WP community lead the way in pushing for increased uptake for it by hosts.

        • jkudish 8:44 pm on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I would agree with the following:

          “If 6% is accurate, I agree that requiring 5.3 is ridiculous, but I’d like to see the WP community lead the way in pushing for increased uptake for it by hosts.”

        • Rob 11:34 am on March 24, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          “Make a point about PHP 5.3, sure — but not PHP 4, that’s pretty ridiculous.”

          Yeah. My point wasn’t so much that PHP 4 is alive and well (it is alive but certainly not very well), but that it isn’t php.net who get to decide what’s dead. If you feel uncomfortable with using PHP 4 as an example, feel free to pretend that I wrote PHP 5.1 (dropped by php.net, but will continue to be supported by RHEL 5 until 2014.)

          “just because a product is supported, doesn’t mean they should continue to use it if newer (including LTS in the case of Ubuntu) versions are available, which, I assume, include newer versions of PHP.”

          On the contrary, if a product is still supported, that is an extremely good reason to continue to use it, regardless of whether an upgrade is available. In large shops, systems are upgraded because it is necessary, not because it is possible. (Note: just because it is possible does not make it necessary.)

          Specifically with regard to PHP, consider how much custom code broke when magic_quotes started to default to off. (It could argued that code was broken, but that would be wrong. If the code always produced correct output for all possible input, then it worked. And the upgrade just broke it.)

          Also remember the PHP developers’ strange fondness for changing a few APIs for no apparent reason with every single patch patch release.

          Sure, these upgrades probably won’t break production code. But they very easily might. And the more custom code you have, the more likely it is that it will break, and the harder and more expensive it becomes and the longer it takes to fix.

          So if the upgrade isn’t actually required, why do it at all? There’s no upside, and a massive possible downside.

      • Keith Casey 7:26 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        As of last November, the last of the major distros went to PHP 5.3.x as their base install. That should help adoption but it’s still nowhere close to mainstream. I’m guessing the 5.3 numbers will grow nicely this year and become common next year.

        • Rob 1:22 pm on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          “As of last November, the last of the major distros went to PHP 5.3.x as their base install.”

          Except CentOS. And not supporting CentOS would be a bit embarrassing.

      • Ramoonus 11:00 am on March 20, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Not all providers always run the latest OS version

    • Erlend 6:30 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great looking roadmap. I actually wouldn’t mind several more releases like this one to allow the smaller sister projects to catch up.

    • Ferrari 6:33 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It’s very existing to see WP keep working on performance and writing experience.

    • Devin Walker 6:37 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Looking forward to the release!

    • Michael Bastos 6:40 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Any changes planned for multisite? This seems like an off the wall question to ask but will there ever be any plans to add an optional python API stream for those of us running it along side php on our servers and looking to build plugins that take advantage of some of the newer Google API and cloud storage features. This plan looks great…

      • Mark Jaquith 4:37 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Multisite enhancements and bugfixes will probably go in. Nothing planned as big as the Python API you mentioned!

        • Michael Bastos 3:02 pm on April 8, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Thanks Mark, I’ve been wanting to create a Python Strings plugin that lets me call python function calls from the WordPress SQL DB but I wasn’t sure if this was something you guys already had planned, if I make something useful I’ll shoot it your way but I just wanted to make sure I wasn’t working on something you guys already had on the table.

    • Chip Bennett 7:28 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Activation/Deactivation/Install/Uninstall Hooks for Themes, as per their analogous Plugin hooks? (Pretty pretty please?!? :D )

      • scribu 9:17 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’m pretty sure this would get in, if there was a patch for it.

        • Chip Bennett 9:20 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I can try; I’m not sure I have the chops for something like this.

        • scribu 9:22 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          If you do come up with something, attach it to #14955

        • Chip Bennett 9:27 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Okay then; it’s a project for me, unless someone beats me to the punch!

        • vachi 4:37 am on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          i was working on his than dropped, will look for my code and share, thanks for reminding :)

        • Keith Casey 2:21 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          @chip – First, start off by writing a short comment describing each and every step. Then don’t worry about the overall code, but just try to implement the individual lines. Even if you can’t do all of it, someone else will be able to follow your intent and more easily give you a hand.

          Or you may find out the little pieces are feasible. ;)

    • necenzurat 7:31 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      can someone make JQuery default on Google CDN?

      • Mark Jaquith 4:39 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        There’s a plugin for that. Not considering it for WP core right now.

      • Chris Jean 9:20 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’d like to mention that this is not a good idea and people having plugins or themes that do this is also not a good idea. Typically, there are slight issues with specific versions of jQuery. Sometimes these issues need to be worked around with specific changes to the JS code.

        As WordPress does things right now, a plugin or theme dev can look at the WordPress version, know the jQuery version (as long as no one else has changed it), and load the appropriate code to make sure that problems are avoided. If the jQuery version is out of sync with the WordPress version, this can no longer work and increases the likelihood of JS code breaking unexpectedly due to unknown jQuery versions being run.

    • Brian 7:31 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Is an overhaul of media handling in the works for 3.2, or is it going to be pushed a bit?
      http://codex.wordpress.org/GSoC2011.#Media_.280.29

    • Pepe 7:32 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Loving the EOL for IE 6… dieeee!!

    • Francisco 7:33 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      What about new 2011 Theme ? Is that going to happend ?

    • Jeroen van Wissen 7:34 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      And what about a complete new ‘Media Library’ with file browser and folder tree ;-) ?

    • Joe Flood 7:38 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Distraction-free writing. Can’t wait.

    • deanjrobinson 11:01 pm on March 18, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m sure there are probably a dozen others out there too, but I added a “distraction free writing” feature to my Fluency Admin plugin that was updated a couple of weeks ago.
      eg. http://www.flickr.com/photos/deanjrobinson/5481489470/

      • Mark Jaquith 4:35 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Thanks for sharing! We’re looking at a bunch of things for inspiration. Will play around with the latest Fluency.

    • arena 12:36 am on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      • List Tables API improvements : I am sure more improvements can be made if all this classes have the same name. In MailPress, my plugin manages 20 admin screen (lists like posts, taxonomies but also item screen (mail, user)) with 20 different files containing different classes with the same name : MP_AdminPage. This is made possible because there is only one admin screen (so only one MP_AdminPage class) at a time. Think about it !
      • scribu 2:14 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I think having different classes with the same name is a bad idea. Since the classes extend the same base class, you can assign different instances to the same variable and use it without worries.

      • scribu 2:17 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        You would just loose flexibility and clarity, without gaining anything.

    • Chuck 1:17 am on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      ooh the changed-files-only upgrades would be awesome; wanting that for some time now. scanning would be cool too. Speed = yay, php5x = yay,

    • Luis 1:31 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      My only wish is that the default theme is not updated when core is updated, since we have the ability to update themes separately, leave the theme alone and let us update it separately. Other than that, great job. I love WordPress.

    • dartiss 2:30 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m excited by this release… it’s good to have a pause every-so-often from throwing new features at a product and concentrate on speed improvements and having a general “housekeep”.

      I’d love there (soon) to be a “small niggles” release too – no big changes, but lots of bug fixes and general tidying up of minor issues.

    • scribu 3:24 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just in case I don’t make it to the meeting on Wednesday, I would like to continue the work on advanced taxonomy and meta queries, specifically improving the SQL and fixing some API issues.

    • Travis 4:24 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Will dropping re-install of Akismet and Hello Dolly on core upgrade be included in 3.2?

    • Marger 4:47 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      More speed is always a good thing. Will database calls and php performance be looked at? My web host tells me lots of database calls and the php system calls cause most of the system load in a shared hosting environment.

      At the moment front side performance seems ok with an optimized theme, but the admin side always feels kinda sluggish, even with different web hosts.

      • Mark Jaquith 4:32 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        PHP Performance is going to be looked at. We can probably do better at only loading the things that are needed for a specific admin page. And we’ll continue to identify admin screens that could be sped up or need help scaling.

    • Paul Hastings 9:55 pm on March 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sounds like awesome news!

    • Maor Barazany 1:06 am on March 20, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Will the options API improvement will be part of 3.2?
      http://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/14365

      • Mark Jaquith 4:30 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I’d be fine with that. Seems like a small enhancement. There will be enhancements and bug fixes not mentioned in this post. This post is about things that could be called features.

    • mjlodge 1:23 am on March 20, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I like the focus. WordPress has gotten a bit bloaty over the years and I don’t use many of the newer features for a regular blog, so anything that increases speed and reduces size is welcome.

    • Ramoonus 11:00 am on March 20, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      This will also make life for plugin developers easier. since there is less PHP hassle to take care of

    • ashish 12:12 pm on March 20, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just wondering if implementing core plugins (like drupal) will help it become lighter…

    • tuxy1 3:19 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Give us core plug-ins, finally! For more speed AND less server load!

    • SK 7:22 am on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If you folks are working on the post editor, can you please please please fix the post editor warning screen when multiple users accidentally begin working on the same article. It’s been a bug since 3.0. – http://wordpress.org/support/topic/text-editor-warning-issue-with-wp-30?replies=6

    • Rakesh 12:24 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      It was earlier told that removing the /blog slug on the main blog in WPMS would be addressed in a future release. Any plans in 3.2?

      • Andrew Nacin 2:27 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Likely no. Nothing major for multisite is planned for 3.2, and global permalink detection would be a pretty big enhancement. (Needs a patch first before consideration.)

    • Frank 2:32 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Also my improvments or wishes?

      Exclude functions (example: revisons) to Core plugins
      Standardize how plugins deal with settings and navigation
      Better localization support, to many memory and use php-standard functions for localization (this reduce the memory with PHP5)
      Page speed optimizaton (filter rewrite rules)
      n to n relationship for attachments
      Make the admin more easily themable
      Move Akismet and Hello Dolly out of the core package; not only from upgrades
      Kill all inline-css-styles

    • Juan [PotterSys] 4:31 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Regarding IE6 EOL, Microsoft is on IE6 Countdown ( http://www.ie6countdown.com/ ). It _could_ be an option to BrowseHappy (it’s from Microsoft; but it cuts out other browsers)

      • Andrew Nacin 2:25 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        BrowseHappy.com is a WordPress (and Matt) creation, so the goal would be to update that. IE7 isn’t modern either.

      • Aziz Poonawalla 12:56 pm on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        China has 34% IE6 usage?!?! does this mean WP 3.2 will become closed to the Chinese internet userbase?

        • Mark Jaquith 3:55 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Absolutely not. We’re not blocking IE6, we’re just not investing time in supporting it specifically. They already get a sub-par experience, so that won’t really be a change.

      • Mark Jaquith 4:06 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I don’t want to send IE6 users to a site where Microsoft advocates IE8, a old and terrible browser. Yes, I said IE8. Windows XP users can’t run IE9. And even IE9 is about 2 years behind the latest stable versions of Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Opera.

    • Rakesh 6:07 pm on March 21, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      “If your existing WordPress installation has been set up for more than a month, due to issues with existing permalinks. (This problem will be fixed in a future version. See Switching between subdomains and subfolders for more information.) ” http://codex.wordpress.org/Create_A_Network

      Is there a plan to take care of this in 3.2?

      • Andrew Nacin 2:24 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Probably not — no major plans for changes to multisite in 3.2. This limitation is circumventable, but the point of the limitation is to avoid shooting oneself in the foot, as the main site’s links will break in a subfolder setup.

    • Terry Smith 2:41 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Must try to get improved comment loading in as a patch.

    • Steve 7:44 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I know this probably isn’t the right place to ask this but the current way Muttisite works (with a set of tables per blog) is horrible. I know that its down to how multisite was created and to avoid major changes in the WP core files but now they’ve been merged are there any plans to move away from a set of tables per blog and towards a blog_id column on a single set of tables? I appreciate that it would mean a large amount of scary work for people with large sites but from a DB point of view it would make more sense.

      • Mark Jaquith 4:01 am on March 23, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        No plans. Never, would be a safe bet. The sharded nature was by design. WordPress can host anywhere from one site to 18 million sites (WordPress.com). This wouldn’t be possible if not for sharding.

    • hakre 11:05 am on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Oh please fix the memory issue we have, that memory is not configurable because of the 256MB limit in admin: #13847

    • Walter Jeffries 3:05 pm on March 22, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’m less interested in new features (e.g., editor) than in stability, stability, stability and speed of the engine. The improved update is good. Making sure plugins keep functioning is critical. Don’t break things. Every time there is a “drop of support” for PHP older versions, etc I worry because is my web host going to update in time? This slows down the updating cycle.

    • shawn 9:27 pm on March 26, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Seriously depressed that once again the media manager is being pushed to the sidelines. It may just be me, but every time we have brought up this topic over the past 2 years, we are told to wait for the next release. In fact during the 3.1 discussion it was made very clear to everyone that 3.2 would focus on media….

      Sad day…

      • Joseph Scott 5:18 pm on March 28, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        If it something you want to tackle then starting with a plugin that would improve the media experience would be a good way to develop and test new approaches, especially if current core focus is else where.

    • graq 8:13 am on March 28, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      From the perspective of making things ‘faster and lighter’, it would be really good to have a nicer way of mapping multisite blogs into the blogs.dir directory, so that web servers can easily be configured to cache media files (rather than have to hit PHP every time). Or have I missed a trick?

    • Andrés Sanhueza 4:30 pm on March 30, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      If you are thinking in a better UI for writing, you can do something that hides or show the only relevant fields when choosing a given “post format”, with an API that can be used for other stuff.

    • Scott Kingsley Clark 6:20 pm on March 30, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Will the upgrades improvements roll over to the way plugins / themes are upgraded too, or is this ONLY for when upgrading WP Core?

      • Dion Hulse (dd32) 12:13 am on March 31, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        In the case of the partial upgrades (Zip archive containing only changed files between versions) for now that’ll be limited to core, It may be offered in future for plugins but Core benefits from it much more as it’s a 3MB zip containing 99% unchanged files (in the case of .1-.2, .2-.3 etc) whereas most plugins will be sub-100K.

        The FTP optimizations will apply to all Upgrader actions (Core upgrades, Core Reinstalls, Theme/Plugin Upgrades & Installs).

        • Scott Kingsley Clark 12:59 am on March 31, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Thanks for the clarification. Hopefully in the future offering that feature for plugins or making it hookable so it could be enabled by plugins would be beneficial for larger ones.

    • Jim Lynch 9:54 am on April 11, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Distraction free writing? How is WordPress going to keep the kids quiet, the phone from ringing and the dogs from wanting to be walked? Looking forward to the release. Thanks to everyone who works so hard to make things so easy.

    • tux. 3:14 pm on April 16, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Still waiting for core plugins.. nag, nag.

    • Andrés Sanhueza 11:45 pm on April 28, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Make the API for adding fields to the Quick edit more intuitive. Related: http://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/16392

    • Johan 8:12 am on May 19, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      How do you actually measure “faster”? Is there some kind of benchmark suite or tests that verify this? I’m getting a bit tired of reading “it feels faster” and would prefer seing a profile output from xdebug or something. mutter mutter.

    • Tushar Agarwal 9:13 am on July 5, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The new wordpress 3.2 is very improved and feels much faster than earlier. I simply love the new fullscreen mode / zen mode.

    • Thomas 7:55 pm on July 7, 2011 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Great work on WP 3.2 the speed are UI changes are excellent.

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