WordPress.org

Ready to get started?Download WordPress

Make WordPress Community

Welcome to the official blog of the community/outreach team for the WordPress open source project!

This team oversees official events, mentorship programs, diversity initiatives, contributor outreach, and other ways of growing our community.

If you love WordPress and want to help us do these things, join in!

Getting Involved

We use this blog for status reports, project announcements, and the occasional policy debate. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to comment on posts and join the discussion.

You can learn about our current activities on the Team Projects page. There projects are suitable for everyone from newcomers to WordPress community elders.

You can use our contact form to volunteer for one of our projects.

Communication

In addition to discussions on this blog, we have weekly IRC meetings Thursdays at 19:00 UTC in the #wordpress-getinvolved channel on irc.freenode.net (webchat) for real-time communication.

Each week is devoted to a specific area:
• 1st — Meetups/other local events
• 2nd — Mentorship, diversity
• 3rd — WordCamps/conferences
• 4th — Contributor recognition, .org sites
• (5th — Virtual party)

Recent Updates Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Michael 7:22 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: WPTV mods   

    Categories: WordPress.tv ( 3 )

    It’s been a lively and busy week for the WordPress.tv mod team.

    New Moderators Added

    In addition to the mods added last week, we have added three new mods to the team this week. Welcome!
    Joan (@joanboluda)
    Chantal (@chantalcoolsma)
    Ben (@ubernaut)

    Non-English Videos

    Non-English videos got a nice boost this week. With the revised guidelines for non-English videos, this week we published WordCamp videos in
    Swedish
    Slovak
    Danish
    Romanian
    German
    Japanese
    and Hebrew

    And one of the three most viewed videos this week one was in Slovak.
    Martin Viceník: Video a WordPress (Slovak)

    Facts from the Last 7 Days

    In the last 7 days we published 21 videos from 8 different WordCamps around the world.

    The three most viewed for the that 7 day period were:
    Dan Beil: How NOT to Develop (With WordPress)
    Martin Viceník: Video a WordPress (Slovak)
    Zac Gordon: Why Setting Up Themes Is a Niche in Itself, What to Know

    We are currently busy moderating and scheduling the remaining WordCamp Chicago and the WordCamp Hamburg (German) videos and we are starting to get new videos from WordCamp St Louis.

    Central Post-Production Moves Forward

    And to top it all off the central post-production process to help WordCamp organizers with video processing is moving from a “pre-alpha” stage to an “alpha” stage.

    Exciting times ahead!

     
    • Jen Mylo 7:27 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      The main reason for scheduling videos is to prevent overwhelming the WP Planet feed. I think we’re doing this backwards. Our goal should be to get as many videos posted as soon after events as possible. We could change it so instead of the “posts” going to the feed, we just send a specific tag or category, and in that case we could have written posts (that say which videos are going up or which WCs have new videos posted) that go to the feed so approved videos could be published instantly instead of scheduled in dribs and drabs. If I have Matt make that change, would someone on the mod team be up for posting once a week with a summary of new videos?

    • Michael 7:33 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sure, that sounds great. I can handle that.

    • Joan Boluda 5:26 am on July 18, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Happy to joint the team! Very exciting times ahead, indeed! :)

  • Andrea Middleton 6:55 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: ,   

    Categories: WordCamps ( 30 )

    Team chat 7/17/2014
    Topic: WordCamps

    Agenda:

    • halfway through the year of WordCamps update
    • sponsorship squad update
    • new community sponsor applicants
    • WordCamp mentors update

    Add any other WordCamp-related topics. :)

     
  • Jen Mylo 2:30 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: travel assistance,   

    Categories: Community Management ( 11 )

    A Note About WCSF Travel Assistance 

    I’ve been reviewing all the travel assistance applications with the help of @andreamiddleton, and I’ve seen quite a few from people who shouldn’t really need to apply for need-based financial aid. As the rest of the decisions/offers go out today and tomorrow, you may get asked how the decisions were made, so I thought I’d post about it here. Here’s what we posted on the WCSF site as criteria when we opened applications:

    Contributors to WordPress. For people who work for a WordPress-based company, coming to WCSF is an easy decision, but for contributors who volunteer and don’t have a WordPress-based day job, it can be financially daunting. As a global project, it can also be tough for those contributors who live on the other side of the planet to make the trip as easily as those in the same hemisphere. We hope to bring as many active contributors to the event as possible.
    Diversity. For a global project with users and contributors from many walks of life, our events are often overwhelmingly attended by able-bodied, young, white men. Since a more diverse contributor pool means a stronger project, we hope to bring more of the underrepresented voices to the event.
    Teachers. Open source literacy is important, and the educators who are teaching WordPress to their classes are helping grow the next generation of contributors. Since we’d like to create more school education programs, bringing teachers to the event can help bridge the gap between industry and academia.

    Why then did we get so many applications from able-bodied, North American, caucasian men who work for WordPress-based companies (and a couple of women, but really a lot of men)? Someone working for a wp-based company should be working with their employer to cover their travel costs. In cases where I’ve been able, I’ve reached out to company heads/decision makers and asked them to send their employees who ask, especially those who are contributors. In some cases they say yes, because they recognize the value of being part of the event. In others, they say no, either because their business has cash flow issues, their priorities don’t include investing in the community this way, or they don’t want to send that specific employee for reasons that aren’t any of our business.

    Good WordPress developers tend to charge anywhere from $50 – $150 (or more if they’re really good) per hour for freelance work. WordPress developers are always in need. The cost of a trip to the WCSF event could be earned by a person with these skills in a weekend or two. If you could earn that kind of money in a weekend or two, that’s not the same as having true financial need. To clear up the difference, I thought I’d post a couple of descriptions to show what really counts or doesn’t count as financial need.

    Has Financial Need:

    • A single parent who can only work part-time due to their childcare responsibilities
    • Someone physically disabled whose employment options are limited
    • Someone who’s unemployed and is not a developer, so their contribution skills are not as marketable
    • A reliable contributor who works at a non-wp day job and would not only have to pay for the trip, but would lose income due to taking time off
    • Someone who works successfully with WordPress, but in a country where the currency is devalued enough that being successful there would not afford the kind of money needed for the US trip (talking about locals here, not American/European ex-pats drawing US/Euro salaries while living someplace cheap and exotic)

    Needs to Pick Up a Freelance Gig:

    • WordPress developers and themers in general, but especially those in highly developed nations
    • Someone who quit their wp-related job and are thinking about starting a new business
    • Someone who quit their wp-related job and decided to take a few months off before looking for a new one
    • Someone who quit their wp-related job pretty much in general unless it was for a limiting reason like disability or illness that prevents working

    Think of it like applying for financial aid for college. It’s not just about if you have ready cash — let’s face it, most people don’t have one or two thousand dollars just sitting around — it’s about your ability to earn it. If you have the ability, then you should use it. If you don’t have the ability, that’s financial need.

    We can discuss this more in today’s WordCamp-themed team chat if people have objections to this definition of need or want to suggest additional criteria.

     
    • Andy McIlwain 4:48 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think making the intent clearer, or more explicit, would help. Instead of starting off with the focus on travel assistance — which anyone would be interested in — start off with the focus on diversity.

      “We want more involvement from volunteer contributors who don’t make a living with WordPress; more involvement from under-represented groups around the world; and more involvement from educators who are teaching the next generation of potential contributors. We’re offering travel assistance to make this happen.”

      That way the travel assistance is simply a means to an end.

      As it stands, we lead with this:

      “This year we are excited to announce a travel assistance program to make it possible for more WordPress community members to attend the annual conference. This assistance may cover all or part of the conference registration fee, travel, and/or lodging, based on need.”

      Boom! I’m in. That’s a very compelling offer.

      “There are no specific requirements to apply for travel assistance — we won’t ask to see your tax returns — but we do have some goals in mind as we introduce the program. There are three areas where we especially hope to use this money:”

      No specific requirements, some goals in mind, hope to use the money… great. These are soft objectives, so what do I have to lose by applying, even if I’m not a perfect fit?

      “Our travel assistance team will be looking for applicants passionate about WordPress who would not be able to attend the event without financial assistance.”

      Again, still describes me. I consider myself passionate about WordPress, and I know I’d never be able to attend the event without some financial help. I don’t have the money and I do not consider myself to be in a situation where I can just go out and get the money on a whim.

      So, I’m guessing that’s why we’ve received applications from able-bodied, North American white men who work for WordPress-based companies (like me).

      Based on what I read, I felt that I qualified. Now I just feel guilty for applying. :(

      • Jen Mylo 5:50 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        It’s not a matter of feeling guilty, it’s a matter of making the decision process clearer so that if anyone gets upset about not being offered travel assistance once all the decisions are mailed out (by tomorrow).

        It’s not that case that no able-bodied white men will be offered financial aid; however, given the very large number who applied in contrast to our available budget (which was described as being primarily intended for those three situations), I can foresee there being some complaints. And the fact is, some people have the ability to earn the cost of a conference fairly easily, while others do not.

      • Jen Mylo 7:00 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        @andymci, side note: You didn’t apply for travel assistance; you checked the box that said assistance would be helpful on the contributors survey, but never filled out the actual travel assistance application, so if for some reason you thought this post was aimed at you, it wasn’t. :)

        • Andy McIlwain 7:07 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          Well d’oh. :P Didn’t think it was aimed at me specifically (that’d be a bit presumptuous), but I did feel like I fell into the group that it was aiming at. But seeing as I didn’t fill out the paperwork properly…!

    • NathanCorbier 7:41 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I have to agree with Andy. For myself, I am white, physically disabled, am passionate about WordPress. Does this mean, because my job options are limited due to being physically disabled, that I should qualify for travel assistance?

      I own and run a WordPress development company in the midwest. While we’re not planning on sending anyone to WCSF (We usually show up to #wcmpls and will help sponsor next year’s Twin Cities WordCamp), I meet the soft criteria but am not sure I would ethically apply.

      Some hard rules for eligibility are a good idea. My local YMCA has a “hardship assistance” that is income or disability based, and this is only for a $160 dollar a month membership. They want to see payroll for the last 3 months, proof of disability from a county or state social services office, or proof of low income from a food stamp office or evidence of receiving cash assistance. These hard rules ensure that the assistance programs, even though private and charitable, are administered equally.

      • Jen Mylo 7:58 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        “I own and run a WordPress development company” doesn’t sound like your physical challenges have limited your ability to have a successful wp-based job/company. Whereas someone without the use of their eyes or hands (for example) might have a more difficult time trying to accomplish the same thing.

        There’s no single criteria that guarantees travel assistance. There’s an evaluation matrix with numbers assigned for various answers on the application form, and a total high score is more likely to receive assistance than a very low score, with extenuating factors taken into account. It’s also not all or nothing. While some people might get a full ride, others might get a shared hotel room, others might get a flight offset, others might just get access to the block of cheap rooms we have on hold that they can buy themselves.

        The reason I wrote this post is that we got a lot of applications from people very gainfully employed by very successful wp-based companies, folks that travel a lot and have all the latest gadgets and drink a lot of $5 coffees, and I just wanted to put it out there that “I’d like to come/send my employees but I’d rather do it on your dime instead of my own” is not the same as, “I do not have the ability to travel without your financial assistance.”

    • Jasmine Vesque 12:15 am on July 18, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Hi! I just found out about the travel assistance program today. Because of this post, actually. Any chance you will review my application? It would be greatly appreciated.

    • AMEEKER 8:42 pm on July 18, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I think Andy is right on with being more specific about the intent when the scholarship opportunity is announced next time.

      I fall into a lot of the categories you mentioned – I have a disability that prevents me from working many “normal” jobs, I’m a woman, I’m a contributor but not a hard-core developer (so my skills are “less marketable” as you wrote), I earn a living with WP but it’s not extravagant by any means, and I had a couple of folks send me the application asking me to fill it out.

      But I didn’t, because it seemed to me that if I REALLY, REALLY, REALLY wanted or had to go, I’d figure it out. I’d work my ass off so I could earn an extra $2K to attend, and then after earning that $2K make choices to NOT spend that $2K on other thing. I think a lot of folks (woman or not, I can’t say) might feel this same way. They may have applied for the scholarship bc to them, any extra they get isn’t spent on conferences but on already budgeted items and plans.

      • Jen Mylo 2:37 pm on July 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        I shouldn’t have said less marketable — every contribution skill has marketable value elsewhere. I was trying to express the difference between someone who volunteers on documentation or events and someone who can charge $100+ per hour for custom theme development, etc. I apologize if I made it sound as if non-development skills aren’t valuable — we value them! I meant that the applications from people facing unemployment or underemployment were coming from non-developers, and those kind of skills don’t lend themselves as easily to pickup gigs like “spend two days building a custom theme and get paid a chunk of money at a significantly higher rate than an average salary.”

        The travel assistance application had fields allowing for explanations of why they were applying, so people with extenuating circumstances/budget constraints were able to express those, so just the fact of having job wasn’t an excluding factor.

        When I’m done sending out the decisions, I’ll post some stats on the applications (gender, employment, countries, etc.) to provide more insight. But with a $50,000 budget and over 100 applications, it’s just not going to happen that every person who asks for money will get it.

    • Philip Arthur Moore 1:16 am on July 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I’ve withdrawn my travel assistance application but wanted to give a +1 to the concerns raised by Andy. When I applied my thought process was “Cool, this could really take a massive burden off of me, and I think I’d be able to offer a different perspective and background than the average attendee.” After reading this post my thought process was “How could I be so callous as to have applied for this? I’m clearly a privileged male who should look for extra work on the weekends to attend.”

      If the guidelines were laid out beforehand I don’t think I would have applied. I probably won’t go to WCSF now because of no assistance, but I also won’t ask for it anymore because I’m in the “Needs to Pick Up a Freelance Gig” camp. One other note, from someone who made it through college on financial aid:

      Think of it like applying for financial aid for college. It’s not just about if you have ready cash — let’s face it, most people don’t have one or two thousand dollars just sitting around — it’s about your ability to earn it. If you have the ability, then you should use it. If you don’t have the ability, that’s financial need.

      This isn’t accurate. Financial need boils down to the ability to pay for school during a given time period, not to ability to earn money for school. All students have the ability to earn money; circumstances sometimes outside of their control and sometimes inside of their control might hinder that, though, like taking care of family, helping parents with rent, and using any extra money on other loved ones who are in need.

      Anyway, thanks a lot for posting this as clarification. In general I think it’s a very good thing and love that people will have help going to such an important event. Cheers.

      • Jen Mylo 3:16 pm on July 19, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        The “guidelines” were published up front, the only thing new in this post is more of an faq. Yes, I would consider you someone with very expensive skills, and your daily work is wp-based (the very first published guideline under the Contributors section). That said, bringing a representative from the Vietnam community would be of benefit, and flights are really a lot more expensive than from within the US. So we would offer you travel assistance to offset the difference in that cost to make it a level playing field. Then add in fuzzy and generally private factors such as extenuating circumstances as provided in the application form, and we wind up with a decision one way or another.

        There’s $50,000 to spend across 100+ applications, so for example does the free ride go to an American ex-pat living in a developing country who makes money based on American rates, or to a native from a developing country who is working full-time at local rates? Assume both are volunteering for the project at an equal rate. True story! In this situation, I’d offer the ex-pat a flight offset to get the costs equal to what someone in the US would pay, and I’d offer the native person a free ride (also because I’ll likely need to in order for them to get a visa at all). If the ex-pat says thanks but I just don’t have any cashflow (assuming there were no extenuating circumstances on the application, which would have altered the above decision), I would try to steer some work their way if they were interested.

        It would be great if we could just fly in everyone who wanted to come, but we don’t have that luxury yet.

        • Philip Arthur Moore 9:15 am on July 22, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

          I subscribed to this thread but didn’t see your reply until manually checking just now. Sorry. :(

          Then add in fuzzy and generally private factors such as extenuating circumstances as provided in the application form, and we wind up with a decision one way or another.

          Yes, this makes sense.

          In this situation, I’d offer the ex-pat a flight offset to get the costs equal to what someone in the US would pay, and I’d offer the native person a free ride (also because I’ll likely need to in order for them to get a visa at all).

          This also makes sense.

          If the ex-pat says thanks but I just don’t have any cashflow (assuming there were no extenuating circumstances on the application, which would have altered the above decision), I would try to steer some work their way if they were interested.

          This also makes sense.

          Sorry for the late reply. In general, as I said, I really love what you are doing but felt bad about applying after reading this post, not understanding all of the additional points that you’ve made above, which make total sense. I’m a lot clearer on them now. Thanks.

  • VarunAgw 3:09 pm on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: , , supportflow   

    SupportFlow v0.2 released 

    We have released version 0.2 of the SupportFlow which can be downloaded from WordPress plugin directory.

    Current release includes:

    • A statistics page
    • Ability to E-Mail whole conversation to anyone
    • Apart from this there are dozens of minor UI, UX changes along with bug fixes

    Request for Feedback :

    Again you can test its online demo (with username/password: admin/admin) . To give feedback either comment on this post or create an issue here

     
    • Andy McIlwain 3:41 pm on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Just updated my local install. Very nice!

      A few points:

      • Thoughts on using “Tickets” vs. “Threads” to keep labelling consistent?
      • It’d be nice to view a statistics summary on the Dashboard.
      • For blank state notification screen: Took me a moment to realize I needed to create a Tag or Email Account. “No items found” wasn’t very helpful. What about something like “No items found. Create a tag or add an email account to enable notifications.” …?

      That said, I like where this is going. I can definitely see this being helpful for small business websites or ecommerce sites.

      • VarunAgw 6:00 pm on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Thanks for feedback. We will definitely consider implementing them in future :)

      • Ian Dunn 7:18 pm on July 16, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

        Thanks for the feedback Andy :)

        Thoughts on using “Tickets” vs. “Threads” to keep labelling consistent?

        We discussed this in the weekly meeting this morning and agreed that Tickets is a bit better.

        It’d be nice to view a statistics summary on the Dashboard.

        That’s a good idea, we’ve added it to the list :)

        For blank state notification screen: Took me a moment to realize I needed to create a Tag or Email Account. “No items found” wasn’t very helpful. What about something like “No items found. Create a tag or add an email account to enable notifications.” …?

        Great point, this is getting fixed in https://github.com/danielbachhuber/supportflow/pull/143

  • Jerry Bates (jerrysarcastic) 12:48 am on July 11, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: mod squad,   

    Categories: WordPress.tv ( 3 )

    WordPress.tv Moderator Squad Update – What we've been up to 

    Long ago, updates for the WordPress.tv Mod Squad used to be a regular thing, and I miss them. Since there is no better time than the present, here is what we have been up to lately, and also what we are working on for the future.

    The last 30 days

    Here is a snapshot of what we have been up to in the past 30 days:

    • Videos published: 89
    • Camps represented: Orange County, Atlanta, Phoenix, Tokyo, Connecticut, Bologna, Paris, Switzerland, Norrköping, Chicago, Romania, Denmark, Kansai, Hamburg
    • Languages represented: English, German, Japanese, French, Romanian, Dutch, Swiss, Italian

    We have also added two new mods to our merry band over this time, in addition to the 6 active moderators we have currently.

    Expanding our role as moderators

    Watching and publishing videos is awesome, but there are still things that the Mod Squad can do to improve where we are at now, to make wordpress.tv an even more valuable resource for WordPress knowledge! Currently there are two issues on our radar that we will be working on in the near future: Technical issues and Internationalization

    Addressing technical issues

    We don’t publish every video that is submitted, and whenever we are forced to make a call as to wether to publish a video or not, issues with quality (sound, picture, etc.) are the culprit in the vast majority of cases.

    Currently, the WordPress Foundation supplies great camera kits to events around the world, so equipment is not the issue, and yet quality suffers. However, this is understandable, as WordCamp organizers are not usually video professionals, producing video of a live event is a stressful even for pros, and it is “one shot at getting it right or else” proposition. Not easy! So how can we make this better as moderators?

    Since we deal in video every day, and see the problems first hand, we are starting projects to:

    • Improve the documentation that is included with the Foundation Camera Kits
    • Create instructions and tutorials for handling video after the event is over
    • Establishing a sub-group within the Mod Squad to handle post production centrally, to take the load off camp organizers.

    We are in the planning stages on these, and you can expect future announcements on both of these fronts as we start to roll them out. :)

    More non-English videos

    WordCamps are held all over the world, and global use of WordPress is on the rise, so this is an area that we are seeing a lot of growth in. Unfortunately, we are a primarily English-speaking team, so without the ability to speak and understand videos in the ever growing number of languages we see, these videos tend to languish. The solution to this problem is much more direct; We need a global team to match this trend

    Help us make wordpress.tv awesome!

    It goes without saying that our merry band could use some help as we look to expand our skills and responsibilities. Moderating is also open to anyone with a background familiarity with WordPress (you don’t need to be a developer) is welcome to apply to join us.

    We especially need mods who are bilingual to help with our non-English content, as well as anyone with some prior background in video, but any lover of WordPress is encouraged to apply!

    Being a mod just takes 1-3 hours a week of your time (most of it spent watching videos!) and you can apply right here: http://wordpress.tv/apply-to-be-a-wordpress-tv-moderator/

     
  • Jen Mylo 5:36 pm on July 10, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags:   

    Team chat, July 10, 2014
    Topic: mentorship/diversity

    Agenda:

    • GSoC update
    • WCSF travel assistance so far (diversity)
    • Suggest topics in the comments
     
  • VarunAgw 8:04 pm on July 3, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags: ,   

    GSoC SupportFlow online demo 

    This is a follow to my last blog post. I have launched an online demo of SupportFlow which anyone can access. To work with SupportFlow you need to add atleast one E-Mail account. I have also created a demo E-Mail account for you to test it. You can also send E-Mails to this E-Mail ID and they will be shown in SupportFlow admin panel. Note: E-Mails can take upto 15 minutes to show up here.

     

    Here are WP login details:

    URL: http://54.191.16.116/sf/wp-admin/edit.php?post_type=sf_thread

    Username: admin

    Password: admin

     

    Sample E-Mail account

    IMAP Host: imap.gmail.com

    IMAP Port: 993

    IMAP SSL: True

    SMTP Host: imap.gmail.com

    SMTP Port: 465

    SMTP SSL: True

    Username: wordpress.flow@gmail.com

    Password: cqweovuplkcqnthd

     

    How to give feedback

    • Comment in this post
    • E-Mail it to Varun(dt)VarunAgw(dt)com
    • Create an issue here
     
  • Jen Mylo 5:30 pm on July 3, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags:   

    Team Chat Agenda: July 3, 2014 

    Meetups/local events week.

    • Status update.
    • Time to start figuring out the logistics of moving meetups out of my purview and into a more general ‘local communities’ program overseen by @andreamiddleton and @camikaos. Will want to lean on @chaselivingston a bit since he’s been trained to vet and set up new meetups.
     
    • Leo Baiano 6:53 pm on July 3, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      I do not know if it is out of scope, but would like to comment on the experience I have had with the meetup group here in Salvador / Bahia / Brazil.

      Despite living in a city technologically underdeveloped, compared to other cities in Brazil, here we have a very high demand for project development using WordPress, so I created a group on Meetup (http://www.meetup.com/wpsalvador/ ) to meet the guys who works, or uses like WordPress.

      We begin with a shy group, the first meetup I gave a presentation on WordPress, my experience working with this CMS and what I expected from the group was starting. Gradually we were increasing the amount of people and today we have a weekly meetup where standards come together to exchange ideas, talk about projects we’re working on and other banalities. At least once a month we do a more elaborate event with one or two lectures on topics of interest to the community and we are intending to carry out the WordCamp here in 2015.

      I wonder how it has worked monitoring the foundation at these meetups.

    • Chase Livingston 11:13 pm on July 3, 2014 Permalink | Log in to Reply

      Sorry I missed the meeting this afternoon, am on vacation. Happy to help with whatever is needed next week when I’m back.

  • Andrea Middleton 10:42 pm on July 1, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment  

    Insurance for WordCamps in the US and Canada 

    WordCamp teams rejoice! The WordPress Foundation now has a blanket insurance policy for all WordCamps in the US and Canada. I’m pricing out a policy that will cover WordCamps in other parts of the world, but at least now we’re covered in the places that “enjoy” the largest number of lawsuits.

    Just one more thing for WordCamp organizers not to have to worry about. :)

     
  • Jen Mylo 5:08 pm on June 26, 2014 Permalink | Log in to leave a Comment
    Tags:   

    Team Chat: @andreamiddleton, @siobhan, and I are all at the Open Source Bridge conference today, so we will not be able to attend today’s scheduled meeting. Coincidentally, I’ll be attending a session at that time about how other projects recognize contributors. If you all want to meet without us, have at it. You can set an agenda here in the comments, or you can just chat in the channel, or you can take the week off meeting-wise and we can re-convene next week.

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
shift + esc
cancel